Order Papers and Notice Papers
Download as PDF
Text size:

Issue 182

Tuesday, September 17, 2013
2:00 p.m.

Orders of the Day | Notice Paper | Written Questions

The Order Paper and Notice Paper is a document that guides the deliberations of the Senate and lists items of business currently before it. These items are listed in several different categories and in a priority according to an arrangement adopted by the Senate as stipulated in the rules. The majority of these items constitute the Orders of the Day which are called following Routine Proceedings.  These items are themselves divided into two principal categories - government business and other business. Within each of these two categories are items for bills, motions, inquiries and reports of committees.

The Notice Paper contains the text of motions and inquiries not yet called for debate. 

The Order Paper and Notice Paper is prepared every day in advance of the actual sitting.


Order of Business

(The following is an outline of a typical sitting day in the Senate. Variations are possible subject to the Rules and to the decisions of the Senate.)

Senators’ Statements  (15 minutes)

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS  (30 minutes)

  1. Tabling of Documents
  2. Presenting or Tabling Reports from Committees
  3. Government Notices of Motions
  4. Government Notices of Inquiries
  5. Introduction and First Reading of Government Bills
  6. Introduction and First Reading of Senate Public Bills
  7. First Reading of Commons Public Bills
  8. Reading of Petitions for Private Bills
  9. Introduction and First Reading of Private Bills
  10. Tabling of Reports from Interparliamentary Delegations
  11. Notices of Motions
  12. Notices of Inquiries
  13. Tabling of Petitions

Question Period  (30 minutes)

Delayed Answers

ORDERS OF THE DAY

Government Business

  • Bills – Messages from the House of Commons
  • Bills – Third Reading
  • Bills – Reports of Committees
  • Bills – Second Reading
  • Reports of Committees – Other
  • Motions
  • Inquiries
  • Other

Other Business

  • Bills – Messages from the House of Commons
  • Senate Public Bills – Third Reading
  • Commons Public Bills – Third Reading
  • Private Bills – Third Reading
  • Senate Public Bills – Reports of Committees
  • Commons Public Bills – Reports of Committees
  • Private Bills – Reports of Committees
  • Senate Public Bills – Second Reading
  • Commons Public Bills – Second Reading
  • Private Bills – Second Reading
  • Reports of Committees – Other
  • Motions
  • Inquiries
  • Other

NOTICE PAPER

  • Notices of Motions
  • Notices of Inquiries

ORDERS OF THE DAY

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Bills — Messages from the House of Commons

Nil


Bills — Third Reading

Nil


Bills — Reports of Committees

Nil


Bills — Second Reading

No. 1.

June 18, 2013—Second reading of Bill C-54, An Act to amend the Criminal Code and the National Defence Act (mental disorder).


Reports of Committees — Other

No. 1.

April 25, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Plett, seconded by the Honourable Senator Fortin-Duplessis, for the adoption of the tenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry (Canadian Food Inspection Agency's User Fee Proposal for Importer Licensing for Non-federally Registered Sector Products, without amendment), tabled in the Senate on March 21, 2013.


Motions

No. 67.

May 29, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Carignan, seconded by the Honourable Senator Marshall:

That the Special Senate Committee on Anti-Terrorism be dissolved from the time of the adoption of this motion.


Inquiries

Nil


Other

Nil


OTHER BUSINESS

Rule 4-15(2) states:

Except as otherwise ordered by the Senate, any item of Other Business on the Order Paper and any motion or inquiry on the Notice Paper that have not been proceeded with during 15 sitting days shall be dropped from the Order Paper and Notice Paper.

Consequently, the number appearing in parenthesis indicates the number of sittings since the item was last proceeded with.

Bills — Messages from the House of Commons

Nil


Senate Public Bills — Third Reading

Nil


Commons Public Bills — Third Reading

No. 1. (five)

June 13, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Mitchell, seconded by the Honourable Senator Moore, for the third reading of Bill C-279, An Act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Criminal Code (gender identity);

And on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Nancy Ruth, seconded by the Honourable Senator Mitchell, that Bill C-279 be not now read a third time but that it be amended, in clause 3, on page 2, by replacing lines 26 and 27 with the following:

"ethnic origin, sex, gender identity or sexual orientation.''. —(Honourable Senator Plett)

No. 2. (seven)

November 29, 2012—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Runciman, seconded by the Honourable Senator White, for the third reading of Bill C-290, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (sports betting).—(Honourable Senator Baker, P.C.)


Private Bills — Third Reading

Nil


Senate Public Bills — Reports of Committees

No. 1.

June 21, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Day, seconded by the Honourable Senator Mercer, for the adoption of the twenty-fourth report of the Standing Senate Committee on National Finance (Bill S-217, An Act to amend the Financial Administration Act (borrowing of money), with a recommendation), presented in the Senate on June 20, 2013.—(Honourable Senator Mercer)

No. 2. (two)

November 28, 2012—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Ogilvie, seconded by the Honourable Senator Wallace, for the adoption of the fifteenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology (Bill S-204, An Act to establish a national strategy for chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI), with a recommendation), presented in the Senate on November 22, 2012. —(Honourable Senator Merchant)

No. 3. (four)

May 1, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Ogilvie, seconded by the Honourable Senator Patterson, for the adoption of the twenty-third report of the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology (Bill S-202, An Act to establish and maintain a national registry of medical devices, with a recommendation), presented in the Senate on April 30, 2013.—(Honourable Senator Harb)


Commons Public Bills — Reports of Committees

Nil


Private Bills — Reports of Committees

Nil


Senate Public Bills — Second Reading

No. 1.

June 18, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Day, seconded by the Honourable Senator Moore, for the second reading of Bill S-222, An Act to amend the Conflict of Interest Act (gifts).—(Honourable Senator Mercer)

No. 2. (four)

June 18, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator De Bané, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Jaffer, for the second reading of Bill S-220, An Act to amend the Broadcasting Act (directives to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation).—(Honourable Senator Carignan)

No. 3. (six)

April 25, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Jaffer, seconded by the Honourable Senator Hubley, for the second reading of Bill S-216, An Act to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and the Criminal Code (mental health treatment).—(Honourable Senator Carignan)

No. 4. (six)

June 12, 2013—Second reading of Bill S-219, An Act to establish the Canadian Commission on Mental Health and Justice.—(Honourable Senator Cowan)

No. 5. (seven)

April 23, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Cowan, seconded by the Honourable Senator Tardif, for the second reading of Bill S-218, An Act to prohibit and prevent genetic discrimination.—(Honourable Senator Carignan)

No. 6. (six)

June 13, 2013—Second reading of Bill S-221, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (exception to mandatory minimum sentences for manslaughter and criminal negligence causing death). —(Honourable Senator Jaffer)


Commons Public Bills — Second Reading

No. 1. (four)

June 17, 2013—Second reading of Bill C-444, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (personating peace officer or public officer). —(Honourable Senator Carignan)

No. 2. (seven)

June 6, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Plett, seconded by the Honourable Senator Marshall, for the second reading of Bill C-394, An Act to amend the Criminal Code and the National Defence Act (criminal organization recruitment).—(Honourable Senator Dallaire)

No. 3. (six)

June 12, 2013—Second reading of Bill C-266, An Act to establish Pope John Paul II Day.—(Honourable Senator Carignan)

No. 4. (seven)

June 11, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Seth, seconded by the Honourable Senator Doyle, for the second reading of Bill C-314, An Act respecting the awareness of screening among women with dense breast tissue.


Private Bills — Second Reading

Nil


Reports of Committees — Other

No. 1. (one)

June 25, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Andreychuk, seconded by the Honourable Senator Day, for the adoption of the thirteenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade, entitled: Building Bridges: Canada-Turkey Relations and Beyond, tabled in the Senate on June 20, 2013.—(Honourable Senator Fortin-Duplessis)

No. 2. (eight)

April 17, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Smith, P.C. (Cobourg), seconded by the Honourable Senator Comeau, for the adoption of the seventh report of the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament (Amendments to the Rules of the Senate), presented in the Senate on March 19, 2013. —(Honourable Senator Carignan)

No. 3. (eight)

April 17, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Smith, P.C. (Cobourg), seconded by the Honourable Senator Comeau, for the adoption of the sixth report of the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament (Amendments to the Rules of the Senate), presented in the Senate on March 6, 2013.—(Honourable Senator Carignan)

No. 4. (eleven)

December 13, 2012—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Smith, P.C. (Cobourg), seconded by the Honourable Senator Fraser, for the adoption of the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament (Amendments to the Rules of the Senate), presented in the Senate on December 12, 2012.—(Honourable Senator Cools)

No. 5. (fifteen)

March 6, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Smith, P.C. (Cobourg), seconded by the Honourable Senator Fraser, for the adoption of the fifth report of the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament (Amendment to the Rules of the Senate), presented in the Senate on March 5, 2013.—(Honourable Senator Carignan)

No. 6.

August 13, 2013—Consideration of the twenty-seventh report of the Standing Committee on Internal Economy, Budgets and Administration (Review of Senator Wallin’s Travel Expense and Living Allowance Claims), deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on August 13, 2013, pursuant to the Order adopted by the Senate on June 20, 2013.


Motions

No. 183.

June 26, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Martin, seconded by the Honourable Senator Raine:

That the Senate take notice of the month of June as the birth month of Helen Keller, who is renowned around the world for her perseverance and achievements and who, as a person who was deaf-blind, is an inspiration to us all and, in particular, to members of the deaf-blind community; and

That the Senate recognize the month of June as "Deaf-Blind Awareness Month'', to promote public awareness of deaf-blind issues and to recognize the contributions of Canadians who are deaf-blind.—(Honourable Senator Hubley)

No. 144. (three)

February 28, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion, as amended, of the Honourable Senator Cools, seconded by the Honourable Senator Comeau:

That this case of privilege, relating to the actions of the Parliamentary Budget Officer, be referred to the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament for consideration, in particular with respect to the consequences for the Senate, for the Senate Speaker, for the Parliament of Canada and for the country's international relations;

And on the motion of the Honourable Senator Tardif, seconded by the Honourable Senator Cowan, that the question be referred to a Committee of the Whole for consideration. —(Honourable Senator Comeau)

No. 162. (four)

May 8, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Dallaire, seconded by the Honourable Senator Robichaud, P.C.:

That the Special Senate Committee on Anti-Terrorism be authorized to examine and report on the creation, role and mandate of a potential National Security Committee of Parliamentarians;

That the Special Senate Committee on Anti-Terrorism be authorized to examine and report on the role of women in the process of deradicalization in Canada and abroad; and

That the Committee submit its final report to the Senate no later than December 31, 2013, and that the Committee retain all powers necessary to publicize its findings until March 31, 2014. —(Honourable Senator Segal)

No. 179. (six)

June 11, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Cowan, seconded by the Honourable Senator Hubley:

That the Senate take note of the following facts:

1. Prime Minister Stephen Harper stated on May 22nd, while in Lima, Peru, that when his former Chief of Staff, Nigel Wright, gave Senator Michael Duffy more than $90,000 "he did this in [his] capacity as Chief of Staff'';

2. It is not known what consideration the Prime Minister or his office received in return from Senator Duffy for this money;

3. It is not known whether similar payments were made to any other individuals by Mr. Wright or by others in the Prime Minister's Office; and

4. It is not known whether the Prime Minister's former Chief of Staff has or will himself be reimbursed by any third party for his payment to Senator Duffy;

and therefore the Senate urge the Auditor General of Canada to conduct a comprehensive audit of the expenses of the Prime Minister's Office, including any payments made by individuals in the Prime Minister's Office to Parliamentarians; and

That a message be sent to the House of Commons requesting that House to unite with the Senate for the above purpose. —(Honourable Senator Mitchell)

No. 158. (seven)

April 18, 2013—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Ringuette, seconded by the Honourable Senator Lovelace Nicholas:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology be authorized to:

Review the temporary foreign workers program and the possible abuse of the system through the hiring of foreign workers to replace qualified and available Canadian workers;

Review the criteria and procedure to application assessment and approval;

Review the criteria and procedure for compiling a labour market opinion;

Review the criteria and procedure for assessing qualifications of foreign workers;

Review interdepartmental procedures and responsibilities regarding foreign workers in Canada;

Provide recommendations to ensure that the program cannot be abused in any way that negatively affects Canadian workers; and

That the Committee submit its final report no later than April 30, 2014, and retain all powers necessary to publicize its findings until 180 days after the tabling of the final report. —(Honourable Senator Carignan)

No. 75. (fifteen)

May 1, 2012—Resuming debate on the motion, as amended, of the Honourable Senator Comeau, seconded by the Honourable Senator Di Nino:

That the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament be authorized to examine and report on the powers and responsibilities of the officers of parliament, and their reporting relationships to the two houses; and

That the committee present its final report no later than March 31, 2014.—(Honourable Senator Carignan)


Inquiries

No. 72.

May 28, 2013—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Callbeck, calling the attention of the Senate to the need for improved mental health care treatment for inmates in federal correctional institutions, and the benefits of providing such treatment through alternative service delivery options.—(Honourable Senator Tardif)

No. 40.

April 24, 2012—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Cowan, calling the attention of the Senate to the 30th Anniversary of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which has done so much to build pride in our country and our national identity.—(Honourable Senator Andreychuk)

No. 77. (one)

June 18, 2013—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Kinsella calling the attention of the Senate to the cornerstone place of the Senate of Canada in the building and maintenance of the strong edifice of freedom and equality that is Canada.—(Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C.)

No. 57. (one)

December 11, 2012—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Cowan, calling the attention of the Senate to the many contributions of Canadian universities and other post-secondary institutions, as well as research institutes, to Canadian innovation and research, and in particular, to those activities they undertake in partnership with the private and not-for-profit sectors, with financial support from domestic and international sources, for the benefit of Canadians and others the world over. —(Honourable Senator Fraser)

No. 65. (one)

May 7, 2013—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Mitchell, calling the attention of the Senate to the work of Child, Family and Adolescent Mental Health and its need for ongoing support and infrastructure. —(Honourable Senator Cordy)

No. 9. (one)

December 16, 2011—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Mercer, calling the attention of the Senate to Canada's current level of volunteerism, the impact it has on society, and the future of volunteerism in Canada.—(Honourable Senator Robichaud, P.C.)

No. 22. (two)

February 7, 2012—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Callbeck, calling the attention of the Senate to the importance of literacy, given that more than ever Canada requires increased knowledge and skills in order to maintain its global competitiveness and to increase its ability to respond to changing labour markets.—(Honourable Senator Bellemare)

No. 67. (three)

April 30, 2013—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Callbeck, calling the attention of the Senate to the need to address the high rate of youth unemployment in Canada which has remained consistently high for more than two years.—(Honourable Senator Fraser)

No. 75. (four)

June 13, 2013—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Seth, calling the attention of the Senate to the increasing rates of blindness and vision loss in Canada and the strategies to prevent further vision loss.—(Honourable Senator Smith, P.C. (Cobourg))

No. 62. (four)

December 4, 2012—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Lovelace Nicholas, calling the attention of the Senate to the continuing tragedy of missing and murdered Aboriginal Women.—(Honourable Senator Campbell)

No. 70. (four)

May 9, 2013—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Oliver, calling the attention of the Senate to the need to engage in a national conversation to call for the elimination of violence against women, of all ages, in all its forms including physical, sexual, or psychological abuse, and, in particular, on how we, as a national legislative body, can take the lead in educating, preventing, increasing national and global awareness on gender equality and reaffirming that violence against women constitutes a violation of the rights and fundamental freedoms of each individual.—(Honourable Senator Boisvenu)

No. 45. (four)

May 15, 2012—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Tardif, calling the attention of the Senate to access to Justice in French in Francophone Minority Communities.—(Honourable Senator Robichaud, P.C.)

No. 69. (four)

June 18, 2013—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Hubley, calling the attention of the Senate to Canadian children in care, foster families and the child welfare system.—(Honourable Senator Hubley)

No. 35. (five)

April 26, 2012—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Robichaud, P.C., calling the attention of the Senate to the importance of food banks to families and the working poor.—(Honourable Senator Tardif)

No. 71. (seven)

June 6, 2013—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Jaffer, calling the attention of the Senate to radicalization in Canada, and the need for a national strategy that more proactively addresses terrorism by emphasizing a community-based approach to preventing radicalization and to facilitating deradicalization.—(Honourable Senator Segal)

No. 18. (eight)

November 17, 2011—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Robichaud, P.C., calling the attention of the Senate to the issue of poverty in Canada—an issue that is always current and continues to have devastating effects.—(Honourable Senator Cowan)

No. 64. (fifteen)

May 7, 2013—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Mitchell, calling the attention of the Senate to the need for an assessment of the impacts of cutting federal funding to the Experimental Lakes Area.—(Honourable Senator Mitchell)

No. 60. (eleven)

December 10, 2012—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Oliver, calling the attention of the Senate to the state of diversity in the Senate of Canada and its administration and, in particular, to how we can address the barriers facing the advancement of visible minorities in the Senate workforce and increase their representation by focusing on hiring, retention and promotion.—(Honourable Senator Meredith)

No. 68. (thirteen)

May 21, 2013—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Callbeck, calling the attention of the Senate to the growing need for the federal government to collaborate with provincial and territorial governments and other stakeholders in order to ensure the sustainability of the Canadian health care system, and to lead in the negotiation of a new Health Accord to take effect at the expiration of the 2004 10-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care.—(Honourable Senator Callbeck)


Other

Nil


NOTICE PAPER

MOTIONS

No. 181. (six)

By the Honourable Senator Cowan:

June 11, 2013—That a Special Committee on the Residency Requirements for Senators be appointed to consider the constitutional requirement of Senators to reside in their province or territory of appointment, and in particular the meaning of the term "Residence'' for the purposes of section 31(5) and the term "resident in the Province'' for the purposes of section 23(5) of the Constitution Act, 1867;

That the committee be composed of nine members, to be nominated by the Committee of Selection and that four members constitute a quorum;

That, the committee have power to send for persons, papers and records; to examine witnesses; and to print such papers and evidence from day to day as may be ordered by the committee;

That, notwithstanding rule 12-18(2)(b)(i), the committee have power to sit from Monday to Friday, even though the Senate may then be adjourned for a period exceeding one week;

That the committee have power to retain the services of professional, clerical, stenographic and such other staff as deemed advisable by the committee; and

That the committee be empowered to report from time to time and to submit its final report no later than October 31, 2013.


INQUIRIES

No. 73. (ten)

By the Honourable Senator Mitchell:

May 23, 2013—That he will call the attention of the Senate to members of the RCMP who have been victims of harassment and sexual harassment in the RCMP.

No. 74. (nine)

By the Honourable Senator Buth:

May 28, 2013—That she will call the attention of the Senate to the importance of agriculture and agricultural trade to the Canadian economy and rural prosperity.

No. 76. (eight)

By the Honourable Senator Comeau:

May 30, 2013—That he will call the attention of the Senate to how the NDP government is wiping out Acadian and Black representation in the Nova Scotia legislature and to the silence of their NDP friends in the Parliament of Canada on this travesty.


WRITTEN QUESTIONS

No. 14.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

June 23, 2011—With respect to the government decentralization:

A. Could the Government of Canada provide information on proposals prepared from January 1, 2006, to May 31, 2011, regarding the relocation of federal government departments (or parts thereof), agencies and Crown corporations from the National Capital area to the regions of Canada?

B. Could the Government of Canada provide information on assessments completed from January 1, 2006, to May 31, 2011, regarding which federal government departments (or parts thereof), agencies or Crown corporations could be relocated from the National Capital area to the regions of Canada?

No. 59.

By the Honourable Senator Callbeck:

December 10, 2012—In Bill C-38, the Budget Implementation Act, the Conservative government set the stage for drastic changes to the Employment Insurance Act, including a new Appeals Tribunal for all federal social programs and a new definition for the term "Suitable Employment''.

Farming and fishing communities, and employers that are seasonally-dependent need a functional Employment Insurance system to make sure that skilled workers can transition smoothly between those seasonal jobs.

In addition, the changes will require Employment Insurance claimants to keep daily detailed records of their job search. Given that more than 42% of Canadians have literacy levels that are considered not functional, many claimants may have difficulty keeping written records of their job search despite actively looking for work.

1. Has Human Resources and Social Development Canada, Service Canada, or Finance Canada conducted any job market study to determine the impact on the availability of skilled workers for seasonally-dependent industries as a result of the changes to the Employment Insurance Act? If so, what were the results?

2. Has Human Resources and Social Development Canada, Service Canada, or Finance Canada considered any job market initiatives in the event that seasonally-dependent employers are unable to find adequate skilled workers?

3. Has Human Resources and Social Development Canada, Service Canada, or Finance Canada estimated the number of anticipated Employment Insurance appeals that the Tribunal be required to hear per year?

4. Has Human Resources and Social Development Canada, Service Canada, or Finance Canada conducted any feasibility study on the workload that will be required by each member of the new Tribunal?

5. Has Human Resources and Social Development Canada or Service Canada developed a training system for Tribunal members? If so, what does this training entail?

6. Given that Tribunal members will be Ottawa-based, how will local economic realities be taken into account when hearing Employment Insurance appeals?

7. Has Human Resources and Social Development Canada or Service Canada developed policy or guidelines to address the challenges of possible low functional literacy levels among Employment Insurance claimants?

8. How has Human Resources and Social Development Canada or Service Canada trained its employees to recognize the needs of Employment Insurance claimants with low functional literacy levels?

No. 60.

By the Honourable Senator Callbeck:

December 10, 2012—1. In August 2012, the Minister of Human Resources announced changes to the Working While on Claim Pilot Project. This pilot project allowed Employment Insurance (EI) recipients to collect benefits even if they are able to find part-time work.

The previous system clawed back benefits once the part-time wages exceeded 40% of benefits, or $75 a week, whichever is greater. The change means that the federal government will now clawback all new earnings, from the first dollar earned, at a rate of 50%.

In October, the Minister of Human Resources announced a transition measure that those EI recipients who were working while on claim between August 7, 2011 and August 4, 2012 will be given the option of reverting to the rules that existed under the previous pilot project.

(a) How many individuals have utilized this pilot project in each fiscal year, by province, from the year of the project's inception?

(b) Has the Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Service Canada, or Finance Canada estimated how many EI recipients who were working while on claim between August 7, 2011 and August 4, 2012 will opt to revert to the rules that existed under the previous pilot project? If so, what are the results?

(c) Has Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Service Canada, or Finance Canada undertaken any analysis or case studies to compare the impact on income, based on factors such as occupation, wage levels, etc., for individuals in each province between the previous and the new pilot project? If so, what are the results?

(d) Has Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Service Canada, or Finance Canada undertaken any study to estimate the negative impact to the overall economies of each province as a result of this change? If so, what are the results?

(e) Has Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Service Canada, or Finance Canada undertaken any study to estimate the cost to social services in each province as a result of this change? If so, what are the results?

2. On September 15, 2012, the Minister of Human Resources allowed the Extended Employment Insurance Benefits Pilot Project to expire. This pilot project provided an extra five weeks of Employment Insurance benefits to people living in 21 designated regions with high unemployment.

As a province with a chronically high unemployment rate, Prince Edward Island is one of those regions. In addition, the three primary industries of the province are seasonal in nature: agriculture, fisheries, and tourism.

(a) How many individuals have utilized this pilot project in each fiscal year, by province, from the year of the project's inception?

(b) Has Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Service Canada, or Finance Canada undertaken any study to estimate the negative impact to the overall economies of each province as a result of the cancellation of this pilot project? If so, what are the results?

(c) Has Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Service Canada, or Finance Canada undertaken any study to estimate the cost to social services in each province as a result of the cancellation of this pilot project? If so, what are the results?

(d) What initiatives will Human Resources and Skills Development Canada or Service Canada implement to ensure that EI recipients who work in seasonal industries can weather five extra weeks without income?

No. 62.

By the Honourable Senator Callbeck:

December 13, 2012—1. During the September 26, 2012 meeting of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance, Mr. Jeremy Rudin, Assistant Deputy Minister, Financial Sector Policy Branch, Department of Finance, said that the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC) has received funding transferred from the Consolidated Revenue Fund for the purpose of financial literacy.

(a) How much has been transferred from the Consolidated Revenue Fund to the FCAC for the purpose of financial literacy in each of the last five fiscal years?

(b) How much of the transferred funds has been spent for the purpose of financial literacy in each of the last 5 fiscal years? Would you please provide a detailed list of all financial literacy related expenditures for each of the last five fiscal years?

2. Section 18 of the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada Act provides the Commissioner of the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada authority to levy assessments on financial institutions.

(a) How much has been assessed against each financial institution in each of the last five fiscal years? How much in total has been assessed against financial institutions altogether in each of the last five fiscal years?

(b) How much has been paid by each financial institution in each of the last five fiscal years? How much has been collected from financial institutions altogether in each of the last five fiscal years?

No. 67.

By the Honourable Senator Mitchell:

March 5, 2013—With regard to the Prime Minister's statement in the House of Commons on Wednesday, January 30, 2013, that "job creation and economic prosperity are our top priorities. In fact, the Canadian economy has created more than 9000,000 net new jobs since the end of the recession. That is the best record of all G7 countries:''

(a) For the period from July 1, 2009 to March 1, 2013, out of the new 900,000 net new jobs the government claims to have created;

(i) How many of the jobs were filled by temporary foreign workers?

(ii) How many were part-time jobs (fewer than 30 hours per week)?

(iii) How many were indeterminate jobs (permanent, full-time)?

(iv) How many were specified term contract jobs (contracts of 6 months or less)?

(v) What percentage paid above minimum wage?

(b) How many jobs were lost between the period of July 1, 2009 and March 1, 2013?

(c) For the period from January 1, 2006 and March 31, 2013;

(i) How many net new jobs were created?

(ii) How many of the jobs were filled by temporary foreign workers?

(iii) How many were part-time jobs (fewer than 30 hours per week)?

(iv) How many were indeterminate jobs (permanent, full-time)?

(v) How many were specified term contract jobs (contracts of 6 months or less)?

(vi) What percentage paid above minimum wage?

(d) How many jobs were lost between the period of January 1, 2006 and March 31, 2013?

No. 72.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

April 25, 2013—With respect to the Disability Tax Credit, would the Government please provide the following information:

For the period 2005 to present, broken down by fiscal year:

(a) How many people have applied for the credit?

(b) How many applications have been rejected?

(c) On what grounds were those claims rejected?

(d) How many applications were rejected upon further request for further information from the family practitioner?

(e) How many applications were rejected due to a lack of further information from the family practitioner?

(f) How many rejections were overturned upon receipt of further information from the family practitioner?

(g) How many rejections were formally appealed?

(h) How many formal appeals were successful?

No. 75.

By the Honourable Senator Mitchell:

May 2, 2013—1. With respect to the educational requirements for Non-Commissioned (NCO) members of the RCMP, including Corps Sergeant Major; Sergeant Major; Staff Sergeant Major; Staff Sergeant; Sergeant; and Corporal;

(a) What percentage has obtained a College diploma?

(b) What percentage has obtained an Undergraduate University Degree?

(c) What percentage has obtained a Master's University Degree?

(d) What percentage has obtained a Phd. University Degree?

2. With respect to the educational requirements for Commissioned members of the RCMP, including Commissioner; Deputy Commissioner; Assistant Commissioner; Chief Superintendent; Superintendent; and Inspector;

(a) What percentage has obtained a College diploma?

(b) What percentage has obtained an Undergraduate University Degree?

(c) What percentage has obtained a Master's University Degree?

(d) What Percentage has obtained a Phd. University Degree?

3. With respect to the educational requirements for Non-Commissioned (NCO) members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), including the Army, Navy, and Air Force;

(a) What percentage has obtained a College diploma?

(b) What percentage has obtained an Undergraduate University Degree?

(c) What percentage has obtained a Master's University Degree?

(d) What Percentage has obtained a Phd. University Degree?

4. With respect to the educational requirements for Commissioned members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), including the Army, Navy, and Air Force;

(a) What percentage has obtained a College diploma?

(b) What percentage has obtained an Undergraduate University Degree?

(c) What percentage has obtained a Master's University Degree?

(d) What Percentage has obtained a Phd. University Degree?

No. 76

By the Honourable Senator Mitchell:

May 28, 2013—1. As of December 31, 2008, how many individuals were employed under the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) in Canada?

2. As of April 19, 2013, how many individuals are employed under the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP) in Canada?

No. 77.

By the Honourable Senator Mitchell:

May 28, 2013—With respect to the government's economic action plan:

1. Can the government please provide a rationale for why it includes unpaid internships in its employment figures? Being unpaid, these positions do not seem to qualify as bona fide employment.

2. Out of the 900,000 net new jobs that the government claims to have created since 2008, how many are unpaid internships?

No. 78.

By the Honourable Senator Chaput:

June 5, 2013—1. Regarding the previous Official Languages Regulations Re-Application Exercise (begun after Statistics Canada published the data on first official language from the 2001 Census):

(a) which federal institutions took part in this exercise;

(b) what were the expenses (in dollars) incurred by the Treasury Board Secretariat for the coordination of the Regulations Re-Application Exercise;

(c) what were the expenses (in dollars) incurred by each of these federal institutions for this exercise;

(d) which offices of federal institutions were subject to this exercise;

(e) which offices of federal institutions, following this exercise, kept or acquired a bilingual designation, and for which specific circumstances of the Regulations; and

(f) which offices of federal institutions, following this exercise, lost their bilingual designation, and for which specific circumstances of the Regulations?

2. Regarding the current Official Languages Regulations Re-Application Exercise (begun on October 24, 2012, after Statistics Canada published the data on first official language from the 2011 Census):

(a) which federal institutions took part in this exercise;

(b) what were the expenses (in dollars) incurred by the Treasury Board Secretariat for the coordination of the Regulations Re-Application Exercise, as of the date of this question;

(c) what were the expenses (in dollars) incurred by each of these federal institutions for this exercise, as of the date of this question;

(d) what are the forecast expenses for each of these federal institutions for the entire exercise, which will be completed in 2015;

(e) what are the forecast expenses for the Treasury Board for the coordination of the entire exercise, which will be completed in 2015;

(f) which offices of federal institutions were subject to this exercise;

(g) which offices of federal institutions, when this exercise began, had a bilingual designation, as well as the specific circumstances of the Regulations that led to this designation for each office; and

(h) what directives and instructions has the Treasury Board emitted concerning the implementation of this exercise?


© Senate of Canada