Previous Sittings
Previous Sittings

Order Paper and Notice Paper

 
 

The Senate of Canada

Order Paper and Notice Paper


Issue 101

Tuesday, November 29, 2005
2:00 p.m.

Orders of the Day

Notice Paper

Questions


The Order Paper and Notice Paper is a document that guides the deliberations of the Senate and lists items of business currently before it. These items are listed in several different categories and in a priority according to an arrangement adopted by the Senate as stipulated in the rules. The majority of these items constitute the Orders of the Day which are called following the daily Routine of Business.  These items are themselves divided into two principal categories - government business and other business. Within each of these two categories are items for bills, motions, inquiries and reports of committees.

The Notice Paper contains the text of motions and inquiries not yet called for debate. 

The Order Paper and Notice Paper is prepared every day in advance of the actual sitting.


Daily Routine of Business

1. Senators' Statements.

2. Tabling of Documents.

3. Presentation of Reports from Standing or Special Committees.

4. Government Notices of Motions.

5. Introduction and First Reading of Government Bills.

6. Introduction and First Reading of Senate Public Bills.

7. First Reading of Commons Public Bills.

8. Reading of Petitions for Private Bills.

9. Introduction and First Reading of Private Bills.

10. Tabling of Reports from Inter-Parliamentary Delegations.

11. Notices of Motions.

12. Notices of Inquiries.

13. Presentation of Petitions.

14. Question Period.

15. Delayed Answers.

16. Orders of the Day.

17. Inquiries.

18. Motions.


ORDERS OF THE DAY

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Bills

Nil

Inquiries

Nil

Motions

Nil

Reports of Committees

Nil

OTHER BUSINESS

Rule 27(3) states:

Unless previously ordered, any item under "Other Business'', "Inquiries'' and "Motions'' that has not been proceeded with during fifteen sittings shall be dropped from the Order Paper.

Consequently, the number appearing in parenthesis indicates the number of sittings since the item was last proceeded with.

Senate Public Bills

No. 1. (one)

November 1, 2005-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Kinsella, seconded by the Honourable Senator Meighen, for the second reading of Bill S-45, An Act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act.-(subject matter referred to the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights on November 24, 2005)

No. 2. (two)

October 18, 2005-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Grafstein, seconded by the Honourable Senator Ferretti Barth, for the second reading of Bill S-43, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (suicide bombings).-(Honourable Senator Stratton)

No. 3. (two)

November 22, 2005-Second reading of Bill S-47, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (impaired driving) and other Acts. -(Honourable Senator LeBreton)

No. 4. (three)

November 22, 2005-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Grafstein, seconded by the Honourable Senator Goldstein, for the second reading of Bill S-46, An Act respecting a National Philanthropy Day.-(Honourable Senator Prud'homme, P.C.)

No. 5. (five)

December 1, 2004-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Banks, seconded by the Honourable Senator Corbin, for the second reading of Bill S-6, An Act to amend the Canada Transportation Act (running rights for carriage of grain). -(Honourable Senator Banks)

No. 6. (nine)

October 25, 2005-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Grafstein, seconded by the Honourable Senator Cook, for the second reading of Bill S-42, An Act to amend the Food and Drugs Act (clean drinking water). -(Honourable Senator LeBreton)

No. 7. (eleven)

May 12, 2005-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Biron, seconded by the Honourable Senator Robichaud, P.C., for the second reading of Bill S-30, An Act to amend the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (RRSP and RESP).-(Honourable Senator Plamondon)

No. 8. (twelve)

October 18, 2005-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Ringuette, seconded by the Honourable Senator Eggleton, P.C., for the second reading of Bill S-44, An Act to amend the Public Service Employment Act. -(Honourable Senator LeBreton)

No. 9. (two)

May 16, 2005-Second reading of Bill S-34, An Act to amend the Department of Justice Act and the Supreme Court Act to remove certain doubts with respect to the constitutional role of the Attorney General of Canada and to clarify the constitutional relationship between the Attorney General of Canada and Parliament.-(Honourable Senator Cools)

No. 10. (eleven)

December 9, 2004-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Oliver, seconded by the Honourable Senator Cochrane, for the second reading of Bill S-15, An Act to prevent unsolicited messages on the Internet.-(subject matter referred to the Standing Senate Committee on Transport and Communications on February 10, 2005)

No. 11. (eight)

November 24, 2004-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator St. Germain, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator LeBreton, for the second reading of Bill S-16, An Act providing for the Crown's recognition of self-governing First Nations of Canada.-(subject matter referred to the Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples on February 22, 2005)

No. 12. (fourteen)

December 9, 2004-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Stratton, seconded by the Honourable Senator LeBreton, for the second reading of Bill S-20, An Act to provide for increased transparency and objectivity in the selection of suitable individuals to be named to certain high public positions.-(subject matter referred to the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs on February 2, 2005)

Commons Public Bills

Nil

Private Bills

Nil

Reports of Committees

No. 1. (one)

November 24, 2005-Consideration of the sixteenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology (fourth interim report on mental health and mental illness) entitled: A proposal to Establish a Canadian Mental Health Commission, tabled in the Senate on November 24, 2005. -(Honourable Senator Kirby)

No. 2. (one)

November 24, 2005-Consideration of the thirteenth report of the Standing Committee on Internal Economy, Budgets and Administration (committee budget), presented in the Senate on November 24, 2005.-(Honourable Senator Furey)

No. 3. (one)

November 24, 2005-Consideration of the thirteenth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources entitled: Water in the West: Under Pressure, tabled in the Senate on November 24, 2005. -(Honourable Senator Banks)

No. 4. (twelve)

September 29, 2005-Consideration of the seventh report of the Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs (budget-study on the International Policy Statement-power to hire staff), presented in the Senate on September 29, 2005. -(Honourable Senator Stollery)

No. 5. (thirteen)

June 20, 2005-Resuming debate on the consideration of the twelfth report of the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence, entitled: Borderline Insecure, tabled in the Senate on June 14, 2005.-(Honourable Senator Kenny)

No. 6. (thirteen)

September 28, 2005-Consideration of the fourteenth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence entitled: Wounded: Canada's Military and the Legacy of Neglect, tabled in the Senate on September 28, 2005. -(Honourable Senator Kenny)

Other

No. 23. (two) (inquiry)

May 19, 2005-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Léger calling the attention of the Senate to the importance of artistic creation to a nation's vitality and the priority the federal government should give to culture, as defined by UNESCO, in its departments and other agencies under its authority.-(Honourable Senator Prud'homme, P.C.)

No. 34. (two) (inquiry)

November 23, 2005-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Gill calling the attention of the Senate to the National Year of the Veteran and the contribution of Aboriginal Peoples.-(Honourable Senator Dallaire)

No. 2. (three) (inquiry)

December 7, 2004-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Callbeck calling the attention of the Senate to the present inequities of the Veterans Independence Program. -(Honourable Senator Callbeck)

No. 130. (four) (motion)

October 25, 2005-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Kinsella, seconded by the Honourable Senator Stratton:

That the Senate urge the government to implement assistance through the tax system to ensure that excessive fuel costs are not an impediment for Canadians travelling to and from their place of employment including a personal travel tax exemption of $1,000;

That the Senate urge the government to take measures to ensure that rising residential heating costs do not unduly burden low and modest income earners this winter, and in winters to come;

That the Senate urge the government to encourage the use of public transit through the introduction of a tax deduction for monthly or annual transit passes; and

That a message be sent to the House of Commons requesting that House to unite with the Senate for the above purpose. -(Honourable Senator Rompkey, P.C.)

No. 113. (five) (motion)

June 20, 2005-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Poulin, seconded by the Honourable Senator Poy:

That a Special Committee of the Senate be appointed to examine the growing gap between regional and urban Canada;

That research be gathered to consolidate and update current facts and figures regarding this gap;

That testimony be heard to provide an overview of the challenges facing regional areas in several socio-economic areas as transportation, communications, employment, the environment;

That this special committee be authorized to hear testimony in Ottawa and in regions;

That this Special committee be comprised of five members, and that three members constitute a quorum; and that two members be sufficient for the purposes of hearing witnesses;

That the committee be authorized to send for persons, papers and records, whenever required, and to print from day to day such papers and evidence as may be ordered by it;

That, pursuant to rule 95(3), the committee be authorized to meet even though the Senate may then be adjourned;

That the committee be authorized to permit coverage by electronic media of its public proceedings, with the least possible disruption of the hearings;

That the committee submit its final report no later than June 30, 2006, and that the committee retain all powers necessary to publicize its findings until September 30, 2006;

That the committee be permitted, notwithstanding usual practices, to deposit its reports with the Clerk of the Senate if the Senate is not then sitting, and that any report so deposited be deemed to have been tabled in the Chamber.-(Honourable Senator Callbeck)

No. 32. (seven) (inquiry)

October 25, 2005-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Poulin calling the attention of the Senate to the issue of public broadcasting in Canada, with a view to initiating discussion on its role as a public trust.-(Honourable Senator LeBreton)

No. 119. (eight) (motion)

September 29, 2005-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Grafstein:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology study the following and report to the Senate within three months after the adoption of this motion:

1. The designation by the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada of the Montreal residence of Louis Hippolyte Lafontaine, Prime Minister of United Canada from 1841-42 and 1848-51, located on Overdale Street as a National Historic Monument to be purchased and managed by Parks Canada;

2. The creation of an Interpretation Centre at this Lafontaine residence for the purpose of promoting knowledge about the development of Responsible Government in Canada including the part played by Robert Baldwin, co- Prime Minister and Attorney General of Upper Canada, Joseph Howe from Nova Scotia, Charles Fisher from New Brunswick, and Lord Elgin, then Governor General of United Canada;

3. The role of Parks Canada in establishing a network of historic sites across the country to promote an understanding of our parliamentary democracy and the contributions made to this end by various Prime Ministers throughout our history.-(Honourable Senator Cools)

No. 4. (eleven) (inquiry)

November 4, 2004-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Cools calling the attention of the Senate to:

(a) November 6, 2004, the sixtieth anniversary of the assassination of Walter Edward Guinness, Lord Moyne, British Minister Resident in the Middle East, whose responsibilities included Palestine, and to his accomplished and outstanding life, ended at age 64 by Jewish terrorist action in Cairo, Egypt; and

(b) to Lord Moyne's assassins Eliahu Bet-Tsouri, age 22, and Eliahu Hakim, age 17, of the Jewish extremist Stern Gang LEHI, the Lohamei Herut Israel, translated, the Fighters for the Freedom of Israel, who on November 6, 1944 shot him point blank, inflicting mortal wounds which caused his death hours later as King Farouk's personal physicians tried to save his life; and

(c) to the 1945 trial, conviction and death sentences of Eliahu Bet-Tsouri and Eliahu Hakim, and their execution by hanging at Cairo's Bab-al-Khalk prison on March 23, 1945; and

(d) to the 1975 exchange of prisoners between Israel and Egypt, being the exchange of 20 Egyptians for the remains of the young assassins Bet-Tsouri and Hakim, and to their state funeral with full military honours and their reburial on Jerusalem's Mount Herzl, the Israeli cemetery reserved for heroes and eminent persons, which state funeral featured Israel's Prime Minister Rabin and Knesset Member Yitzhak Shamir, who gave the eulogy; and

(e) to Yitzhak Shamir, born Yitzhak Yezernitsky in Russian Poland in 1915, and in 1935 emigrated to Palestine, later becoming Israel's Foreign Minister, 1980-1986, and Prime Minister 1983-1984 and 1986-1992, who as the operations chief for the Stern Gang LEHI, had ordered and planned Lord Moyne's assassination; and

(f) to Britain's diplomatic objections to the high recognition accorded by Israel to Lord Moyne's assassins, which objection, conveyed by British Ambassador to Israel, Sir Bernard Ledwidge, stated that Britain "very much regretted that an act of terrorism should be honoured in this way,'' and Israel's rejection of Britain's representations, and Israel's characterization of the terrorist assassins as "heroic freedom fighters''; and

(g) to my recollections, as a child in Barbados, of Lord Moyne's great contribution to the British West Indies, particularly as Chair of the West India Royal Commission, 1938-39, known as the Moyne Commission and its celebrated 1945 Moyne Report, which pointed the way towards universal suffrage, representative and responsible government in the British West Indies, and also to the deep esteem accorded to Lord Moyne in the British Caribbean. -(Honourable Senator Prud'homme, P.C.)

No. 27. (eleven) (inquiry)

September 29, 2005-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Oliver calling the attention of the Senate to a new report: Business Critical: Maximizing the Talents of Visible Minorities, An Employers Guide, and how this study by the Conference Board of Canada can lead to fundamental changes in the hiring and promotion of visible minorities in both the public and private sectors including the Senate of Canada.-(Honourable Senator Grafstein)

No. 127. (thirteen) (motion)

July 18, 2005-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Andreychuk, seconded by the Honourable Senator LeBreton:

That the Senate of Canada join with the House of Commons, in recommending that the term of John Reid, the Information Commissioner of Canada, be extended by an additional year effective from July 1, 2005.-(Honourable Senator Rompkey, P.C.)

No. 24. (fourteen) (inquiry)

June 2, 2005-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Carstairs, P.C., calling the attention of the Senate to Still Not There. Quality End-of-Life Care: A Progress Report.-(Honourable Senator Corbin)

No. 120. (fifteen) (motion)

June 30, 2005-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Andreychuk, seconded by the Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C.:

That the Senate refer to the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament the issue of developing a systematic process for the application of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms as it applies to the Senate.-(Honourable Senator Andreychuk)

No. 21. (fifteen) (inquiry)

May 10, 2005-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Mitchell calling the attention of the Senate to the Province of Alberta and the role it plays in Canada. -(Honourable Senator Prud'homme, P.C.)

No. 22. (fourteen) (inquiry)

May 10, 2005-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Fraser calling the attention of the Senate to the work of the IPU.-(Honourable Senator Prud'homme, P.C.)

No. 14. (two) (inquiry)

May 11, 2005-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Andreychuk calling the attention of the Senate to the need for a strong integrated Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and the need to strengthen and support the Foreign Service of Canada, in order to ensure that Canada's international obligations are met and that Canada's opportunities and interests are maximized.-(Honourable Senator Andreychuk)

No. 69. (two) (motion)

February 1, 2005-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Kinsella seconded by the Honourable Senator Stratton:

That the Senate urge the government to reduce personal income taxes for low and modest income earners;

That the Senate urge the government to stop overcharging Canadian employees and reduce Employment Insurance rates so that annual program revenues will no longer substantially exceed annual program expenditures;

That the Senate urge the government in each budget henceforth to target an amount for debt reduction of not less than 2/7 of the net revenue expected to be raised by the federal Goods and Services Tax; and

That a message be sent to the House of Commons requesting that House to unite with the Senate for the above purpose. -(Honourable Senator Day)


NOTICE PAPER

INQUIRIES

No. 29. (eleven)

By the Honourable Senator Grafstein:

July 20, 2005-That he will call the attention of the Senate to the following Resolution on the OSCE Mediterranean Dimension, adopted unanimously at the 14th Annual Session of the OSCE Parliamentary Association which took place in Washington on July 5, 2005.

RESOLUTION ON THE
OSCE MEDITERRANEAN DIMENSION

1. Recognizing that the OSCE maintains special relations with six Mediterranean Partners for Cooperation: Algeria, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Morocco, and Tunisia,

2. Highlighting the increasing attention attributed to the Mediterranean Dimension within the OSCE PA, as reflected in the Parliamentary Conference on the Mediterranean held in Madrid, October 2002, the First Forum on the Mediterranean held in Rome, September 2003, the Second Forum on the Mediterranean held in Rhodes, September 2004, and the Third Forum on the Mediterranean scheduled for Sveti Stefan, October 2005,

3. Recalling that the Helsinki Final Act states that "security in Europe is to be considered in the broader context of world security and is closely linked with security in the Mediterranean as a whole, and that accordingly the process of improving security should not be confined to Europe but should extend to other parts of the world, in particular to the Mediterranean area,''

4. Recalling the importance of tolerance and non discrimination underscored by the participants in the OSCE Seminar on addressing threats to security in the Twenty-first Century, held in November 2004 in Sharm El Sheik,

5. Recognizing the importance of the combat against intolerance and discrimination as an important component in the dialogue between the OSCE and its Mediterranean Partners,

6. Emphasizing the importance of trade and economic relations as a pacifying factor within the Mediterranean region, as reflected in the Edinburgh Resolution on Economic Cooperation in the OSCE Mediterranean Dimension,

7. Emphasizing the importance of mutually shared transparency and trust as principles governing the relations between the OSCE and the Mediterranean Partners,

8. Emphasizing that unresolved conflicts constitute permanent security threats in the region, which hamper prospects for sustained peace and prosperity,

9. Pointing to the need to achieve a just and lasting peace for the conflict between Palestine and Israel,

The OSCE Parliamentary Assembly:

10. Stresses the importance of the cooperation between the OSCE participating states and the Mediterranean Partners for Cooperation to address the current global threats to security;

11. Encourages the OSCE participating states and the Mediterranean Partners for Cooperation to promote the principles of non-violence, tolerance, mutual understanding and respect for cultural diversity;

12. Stresses that the OSCE participating states and the Mediterranean Partners for Cooperation initiate an active dialogue on the growing challenge of migration;

13. Recommends the OSCE contribute to a more positive perception of migration flows by supporting the integration of immigrants in countries of destination;

14. Welcomes the appointment of the three Chairman Personal Representatives on Intolerance and Discrimination against Christians and Members of Other Religions, on Combating anti-Semitism, and on Combating Intolerance and Discrimination against Muslims;

15. Encourages the resolution of conflicts in the Mediterranean using cooperative strategies when practicable;

16. Urges all OSCE participating states to cooperate with the Mediterranean Partners on dealing with both "soft'' threats to security, such as poverty, disease and environmental degradation as well as "hard'' threats such as terrorism and weapons of mass destruction;

17. Calls upon the OSCE participating Sates and the Mediterranean Partners to promote the knowledge of different cultures and religions as a prerequisite for successful cooperation;

18. Calls upon the OSCE participating states and the Mediterranean Partners to use education as a vehicle to create tolerance in the next generation;

19. Welcomes the creation in 2005 of a free trade area between Egypt, Jordan, Tunisia and Morocco, and the extension of free trade between such countries and the European Union by 2010, as established in the 2004 Agadir Accord;

20. Welcomes the creation of qualifying industrial zones between Israel, Jordan and Egypt as a model for promoting peace and development in the greater Middle East;

21. Calls upon the OSCE to grant the Palestinian National Authority Observer status, following its request in November 2004 to be made a Mediterranean Partner for Cooperation, in order to enable it to become familiar with the OSCE and assimilate its commitments;

22. Urges the Mediterranean Partners to work with the Arab League to rescind the trade boycott of the state of Israel, as the Mediterranean Partners begin their accession negotiations with the World Trade Organization (WTO);

23. Recommends further participation by parliamentarians from the Mediterranean Partners for Cooperation in the election observation activities of the OSCE PA;

24. Recommends that the OSCE develops relations with other states in the Mediterranean basin, including Libya and Lebanon;

25. Encourages the active participation by parliamentarians from both the OSCE participating states and the Mediterranean Partners in the Third OSCE Parliamentary Assembly Forum on the Mediterranean scheduled in Sveti Stefan, Serbia and Montenegro, in October 2005.

No. 30. (ten)

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

September 28, 2005-That he will call the attention of the Senate to:

1. the decreasing quantity and quality of air passenger and air cargo service available to the regions of Canada;

2. the difficulty many Canadians who live outside our larger cities have in obtaining affordable and competitive air service; and

3. the current government imposed operating requirements on Air Canada and the responsibility and opportunity for the Government of Canada to impose additional conditions on Air Canada so all Canadians can enjoy reasonably comparable levels of air service at reasonably comparable levels of cost, no matter where they live.

No. 31. (ten)

By the Honourable Senator Grafstein:

September 28, 2005-That he will call the attention of the Senate to the following Resolution on Terrorism by Suicide Bombers, adopted at the 14th Annual Session of the OSCE Parliamentary Association which took place in Washington on July 5, 2005:

RESOLUTION ON TERRORISM BY
SUICIDE BOMBERS

1. Noting the horror of historically unprecedented terrorist violence - with the purpose to kill and massacre, to die in order to kill more people, to practice the cult of death, and to express personal desperation only through death;

2. Recalling that in the opinion of the 1986 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Elie Wiesel, unlike the Japanese soldiers who, towards the end of the Second World War chose to sacrifice their lives by attacking exclusively military targets, today's suicide terrorists prefer to attack defenceless and unarmed civilians, children and women, in order to inculcate in the minds of individuals and the masses, a total, in many respects worse than racist, aversion to the "enemy/infidel'', and to totally dehumanize conflicts;

3. Denouncing the fact that some leaders of terrorist groups (Al Qaeda, Hamas, Hezbollah, the Islamic Army in Iraq, and so on) approve, encourage and extol these mass murders, without hesitating to endow them with a value, based above all on a hate-filled and distorted interpretation of certain sacred texts;

4. Noting that - while the Muslim community, on the whole, has always tended to reject all forms of violence and fanaticism - a growing number of people, often very young, are being induced to rethink the prescriptions of the Koran in the light of the mysticism of suicidal terrorism which, by that token, is alien to the Koran and to Islam;

5. Recalling that the most devastating terrorist attacks perpetrated in the world in the past few years have been committed against this disturbing background: the immense tragedy in New York and Washington DC on 11 September 2001, the Madrid attacks on 11 March 2004, and the heinous attacks in various places in Israel, Russia, the Philippines, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iraq, and the massacres in Bali, Casablanca, Istanbul and Jakarta;

6. Noting that a firm warning against terrorism was significantly issued by the Holy Father, John Paul II, who on numerous occasions stated that "Those who kill by acts of terrorism actually despair of humanity, of life, of the future'' (message of his Holiness John Paul II to celebrate World Peace Day, 1 January 2002);

7. Agreeing in this same perspective, that the Simon Wiesenthal Centre, which for decades has been committed to promoting religious tolerance and to combating anti-Semitism, has explicitly promoted a mobilization campaign to get the international community to recognize that terrorist suicide attacks are real "crimes against humanity'';

8. Considering that dealing in death in this manner is a blatant attack on the most elementary human rights and on the international legal order, because it constitutes an intolerable violation of "the general principles of law recognized by civilized nations'' (article 38(I)(c) of the Statute of the United Nations International Court of Justice), by virtue of which human life enjoys universal protection;

9. Considering also that the Statute of the International Criminal Court (adopted by the United Nations Diplomatic Conference in Rome on 17 July 1998) marked a major milestone in the historical process of establishing the legal notion of crimes against humanity as a category in their own right, developed over 50 years as international customary law, as crimes forming part of the so-called jus cogens; and that these are therefore crimes for which no impunity can be accepted, and to which immunities pertaining to political crimes, or to time-barring and all other exemptions from personal responsibility do not apply, and that they are subject to universal jurisdiction, such that all states are duty-bound to prosecute or extradite the guilty, regardless of the nationality of the guilty parties and the place in which the crime is committed;

10. Noting, however, that the Statute did not expressly include in this category of crimes acts of terrorism;

11. Recalling, lastly, that the OSCE Assembly in its Berlin Declaration adopted in July 2002 specifically addressed this issue in paragraph 93 of the Declaration, urging "all participating states to ratify the statute for the International Criminal Court, and to seek broadening of its scope to include terrorist crimes'';

The Parliamentary Assembly of the OSCE:

12. Considers that in the light of the provisions solemnly sanctioned by the Statute of the International Criminal Court, it must be agreed that suicide attacks of the terrorist nature constitute "crimes against humanity'' in that they are deliberately committed "as part of a widespread or systematic attack directed against any civilian population'' which involves the multiple commission of murders of defenceless civilians "pursuant to or in furtherance of (...) organizational policy to commit such attack'' (Art.7(I) of the Statute of the International Criminal Court);

13. Expresses forcefully this conviction, also because the "closing provision'' of subparagraph (k) of article 7 of the Statute of the International Criminal Court, includes among the crimes against humanity "other inhumane acts of a similar character intentionally causing great suffering, or serious injury to body or to mental or physical health'';

14. Expresses the hope that the OSCE member states will make representations before the United Nations General Assembly, clearly and unequivocally, that terrorist acts committed by suicide bombers are, for all the intents and purposes of current international law, very serious "crimes against humanity'' that cannot be time-barred, for which the leaders of the states and groups which order or facilitate their commission must be called to account before the international courts responsible for prosecuting universal crimes;

15. Supports the recent position adopted by the Council of Europe Parliamentary Assembly in its Resolution 1400 of 6 October 2004, stating that "Every act of terrorism... is a challenge to democracy and must be considered a crime against humanity'', and calls on all the OSCE member states of the Council of Europe to adopt and implement the fundamental 1977 European Convention on the Suppression of Terrorism;

16. Endorses the "Guidelines on Human Rights and the Fight Against Terrorism'' adopted on 11 July 2002 by the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe, considering in particular that every action to combat terrorism must be taken in respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, as stated in the Resolution on Human Rights and the War on Terrorism adopted by the OSCE Assembly at its Berlin session in July 2002;

17. Requests that, according to the binding commitments set out in the fundamental United Nations Security Council Resolution 1373, adopted in the wake of the 11 September 2001 tragedy, any OSCE member states that have not yet done so, namely 30 out of 55, ratify and implement the 12 United Nations Conventions and the relevant Protocols on combating terrorism, as expressly requested in the OSCE Bucharest Plan of Action For Combating Terrorism, adopted by the Ministerial Council in December 2001, which recognize d this set of international agreements as being "the basis for the global legal framework for the fight against terrorism'' and welcomes the adoption of the text of a new Convention against Nuclear Terrorism, to be opened for signature in September 2005;

18. Urges the participating states to redouble efforts to finalize a comprehensive convention against terrorism;

19. Endorses the affirmation in the Statement on Preventing and Combating Terrorism adopted by the Sofia Ministerial Council in December 2004 that "the OSCE efforts to counter terrorist threats should be taken in all OSCE dimensions, the security dimension, including the political-military area, the economic and environmental dimension, and the human dimension'';

20. Requests - in the knowledge that the OSCE's comprehensive approach to security gives the organization a comparative advantage in addressing factors across the OSCE dimensions that may engender terrorism - the implementation of the activities put into place within ATU, the OSCE Action against Terrorism Unit, instituted in 2002 to report to the Secretary General, above all in order to step up the coordination of all the Organization's operational instruments to counter terrorism;

21. Welcomes the proactive approach taken by the Action against Terrorism Unit (ATU) in addressing, in collaboration with the United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI), the threat of suicide terrorism through its "Technical Expert Workshop on Suicide Terrorism'' held in Vienna on 20 May 2005, which provided the participating states and the OSCE Partners for Cooperation with important information for a better understanding of this phenomenon and with a platform for sharing experiences in countering it, and encourages the Unit to continue its work in this area; and

22. Welcomes the commitments recently undertaken by the governments of the OSCE in the matter of combating terrorism, and in particular those set out in the OSCE Charter on Preventing and Combating Terrorism and in the Decision on Implementing the OSCE Commitments and Activities on Combating Terrorism, as adopted by the Porto Ministerial Councils in 2002, in which, among other things, the SALW (Small Arms and Light Weapons) Program is indicated as a priority area of interstate cooperation.

No. 33. (three)

By the Honourable Senator Di Nino:

November 3, 2005-That he will call the attention of the Senate to:

1. the need to restore accountability to government;

2. the requirement for competency in government and the recent failings in this area of the current government;

3. the importance of governing with integrity and with a high standard of ethics;

4. the vital functions of both oversight and transparency in ensuring that the government operates efficiently and effectively in the best interests of the nation; and

5. the issues raised by the first Gomery report entitled "Who is Responsible?'' and the measures that need to be taken and safeguards put in place so that no one will every again have reason to write about events in our country, as Mr. Justice Gomery has just written:

"The public trust in our system of government was subverted and betrayed, and Canadians were outraged, not only because public funds were wasted and misappropriated, but also because no one was held responsible or punished for misconduct.''

No. 35. (two)

By the Honourable Senator Mitchell:

November 22, 2005-That he will call the attention of the Senate to issues of importance to the regions in Alberta, with particular emphasis on Grande Prairie.


MOTIONS

No. 121. (thirteen)

By the Honourable Senator Grafstein:

June 29, 2005-That the following declaration adopted at the 2005 OSCE Conference on Anti-Semitism and on other Forms of Intolerance, in Cordoba, Spain, be referred to the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights for consideration and report no later than 16 February, 2006:

Cordoba Declaration

Based on consultations it is concluded that OSCE participating States,

Inspired by the spirit of Cordoba, the City of Three Cultures;

Recognising that respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, democracy and the rule of law is at the core of the OSCE comprehensive concept of security;

Reaffirming that acts of intolerance and discrimination pose a threat to democracy and, therefore, to overall security in the OSCE region and beyond;

Recalling that participating States have committed themselves to ensure human rights and fundamental freedoms to everyone within their territory and subject to their jurisdiction without distinction of any kind and will therefore provide to all persons equal and effective protection of law;

Recalling the decisions of the OSCE Ministerial Councils at Porto (MC.DD/6/02), Maastricht (MC.DEC/4/03) and Sofia (MC.DEC/12/04), and the need to promote implementation of commitments and operational follow up to the work started in 2003 and continued with the OSCE Conference on Anti-Semitism, (Berlin on 28 and 29 April 2004), the OSCE Meeting on the Relationship Between Racist, Xenophobic and anti-Semitic Propaganda on the Internet and Hate Crimes, held in Paris on 16 and 17 June 2004, and the OSCE Conference on Tolerance and the Fight against Racism, Xenophobia and Discrimination, (Brussels on 13 and 14 September 2004);

Acknowledging that the purpose of this Conference was to analyze the status of implementation of these commitments and operational follow up at the national level throughout the OSCE region, highlighting progress and best practices with respect to said implementation, including, but not limited to, promotion of interfaith and intercultural dialogue, and the areas of monitoring, data collection, legislation, law enforcement, education and the media;

Commemorating the sixtieth anniversary of the end of the battles of World War II and mourning the tens of millions of people who lost their lives as victims of the war, the Holocaust, occupations and acts of repression, and condemning all forms of ethnic cleansing and recalling our commitments to take every possible action to ensure that attempts to commit genocide are prevented today and in future as well as our commitments to combat these threats, including through the OSCE, and our rejection of any attempts to justify them;

1. Recall the importance of promoting and facilitating open and transparent interfaith and intercultural dialogue and partnerships towards tolerance, respect and mutual understanding and ensuring the freedom of the individual to profess and practice a religion or belief, alone or in community with others through transparent and non-discriminatory laws, regulations, practices and policies;

2. Condemn without reserve racism, xenophobia, anti-Semitism, and other forms of intolerance and discrimination, including against Muslims and Christians, as well as harassment and incitement to hate crimes motivated, inter alia, by race, colour, sex, language, religion or belief, political or other opinion, national or social origin, birth or other status; and reaffirm their existing OSCE commitments in this field;

3. Recognise that some forms of intolerance and discrimination may have unique characteristics and origins and require proper definition, but the methods to fight against them are, in many fields, similar and include efforts in monitoring, data collection, legislation, law enforcement, education, the media and promotion of dialogue;

4. Reiterate that international developments or political issues never justify racism, xenophobia, or discrimination, including against Muslims, Christians and members of other religions; and that international developments or political issues, including in Israel or elsewhere in the Middle East, never justify anti-Semitism;

5. Reject the identification of terrorism and extremism with any religion, culture, ethnic group, nationality or race;

6. Underscore that the primary responsibility for addressing acts of intolerance and discrimination rests with participating States, and recognize the importance of implementation, through competent authorities by participating States of the commitments agreed to by the Ministerial Councils in Porto, Maastricht and Sofia, as well as other relevant international instruments in the field of tolerance and non-discrimination, and in this regard:

Recall the commitment to develop effective methods of collecting and maintaining reliable information and statistics about anti-Semitic and all other hate motivated crimes and following closely incidents motivated by intolerance in order to develop appropriate strategies for tackling them;

Recall that legislation and law enforcement are essential tools in tackling intolerance and discrimination and that the authorities of participating States have a key role to play in ensuring the adoption and implementation of such legislation and the establishment of effective monitoring and enforcement measures;

Recall the importance of education, including education on the Holocaust and on anti-Semitism, as a means for preventing and responding to all forms of intolerance and discrimination, as well as for promoting integration and respecting diversity;

Recall the important role of the media including the Internet in combating hate speech and promoting tolerance through awareness-raising and educational programmes as well as highlighting positive contributions of diversity to society;

7. Commend ODIHR for setting-up the new Tolerance and Non-Discrimination Programme, and in this regard:

Encourage ODIHR's activities offering advice to participating States on Holocaust education and remembrance, on establishing programmes offering assistance to participating States, in the fields of legislation, law enforcement, and data collection, and on sharing best practices on the issues of racist, xenophobic and anti-Semitic propaganda on the Internet;

Recognise the importance of enhancing the cooperation of participating States with ODIHR with respect to the effective implementation of these programmes and activities;

Encourage ODIHR to continue co-operation with other OSCE institutions and other organisations, such as the United nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD), the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI), the European Monitoring Centre on Racism and Xenophobia (EUMC), and Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research;

8. Encourage the ongoing activities of the three Personal Representatives on Combating Racism, Xenophobia and Discrimination, also focusing on Intolerance and Discrimination against Christians and Members of Other Religions, on Combating Anti-Semitism, and on Combating Intolerance and Discrimination against Muslims, and welcome their ongoing role in raising awareness of the overall fight of the OSCE to combat discrimination and promote tolerance;

9. Underline the crucial role national parliaments play in the enactment of the necessary legislation as well as serving as a forum for national debate, and commend the work done by the Parliamentary Assembly of the OSCE in raising awareness in the implementation of the OSCE commitments regarding racism, anti-Semitism, xenophobia and other forms of intolerance and discrimination;

10. Recognise that civil society is a key partner in the fight against discrimination and intolerance and that enhanced communication and dialogue between participating States and civil society can advance implementation of commitments and operational follow up at the national level.

No. 129. (eleven)

By the Honourable Senator Grafstein:

July 20, 2005-That the following Resolution on Combating Anti-Semitism which was adopted unanimously at the 14th Annual Session of the OSCE Parliamentary Association, in which Canada participated in Washington, D.C., on July 5, 2005, be referred to the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights for consideration and that the Committee table its final report no later than February 16, 2006:

RESOLUTION ON
COMBATING ANTI-SEMITISM

Recalling the resolutions on anti-Semitism by the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly, which were unanimously passed at the annual meetings in Berlin in 2002, in Rotterdam in 2003 and in Edinburgh in 2004,

1. Referring to the commitments made by the participating states emerging from the OSCE conferences in Vienna (June 2003), Berlin (April 2004) and Brussels (September 2004) regarding legal, political and educational efforts to fight anti-Semitism, ensuring "that Jews in the OSCE region can live their lives free of discrimination, harassment and violence'',

2. Welcoming the convening of the Conference on Anti-Semitism and on Other Forms of Intolerance in Cordoba, Spain in June 2005,

3. Commending the appointment and continuing role of the three Personal Representatives of the Chairman-in- Office of the OSCE on Combating Anti-Semitism, on Combating Intolerance and Discrimination against Muslims, and on Combating Racism, Xenophobia and Discrimination, also focusing on Intolerance and Discrimination against Christians and Members of Other Religions, reflecting the distinct role of each in addressing these separate issues in the OSCE region,

4. Reaffirming the view expressed in earlier resolutions that anti-Semitism constitutes a threat to fundamental human rights and to democratic values and hence to the security in the OSCE region,

5. Emphasizing the importance of permanent monitoring mechanisms of incidents of anti-Semitism at a national level, as well as the need for public condemnations, energetic police work and vigorous prosecutions,

The Parliamentary Assembly of the OSCE:

6. Urges OSCE participating states to adopt national uniform definitions for monitoring and collecting information about anti-Semitism and hate crimes along the lines of the January 2005 EUMC Working Definition of Anti- Semitism and to familiarize officials, civil servants and others working in the public sphere with these definitions so that incidents can be quickly identified and recorded;

7. Recommends that OSCE participating states establish national data collection and monitoring mechanisms and improve information-sharing among national government authorities, local officials, and civil society representatives, as well as exchange data and best practices with other OSCE participating states;

8. Urges OSCE participating states to publicize data on anti-Semitic incidents in a timely manner as well as report the information to the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR);

9. Recommends that ODIHR publicize its data on anti-Semitic crimes and hate crimes on a regular basis, highlight best practices, as well as initiate programs with a particular focus in the areas of police, law enforcement, and education;

10. Calls upon national governments to allot adequate resources to the monitoring of anti-Semitism, including the appointment of national ombudspersons or special representatives;

11. Emphasizes the need to broaden the involvement of civil society representatives in the collection, analysis and publication of data on anti-Semitism and related violence;

12. Calls on the national delegations of the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly to ensure that regular debates on the subject of anti-Semitism are conducted in their parliaments and furthermore to support public awareness campaigns on the threat to democracy posed by acts of anti-Semitic hatred, detailing best practices to combat this threat;

13. Calls on the national delegations of the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly to submit written reports at the 2006 Annual Session on the activities of their parliaments with regard to combating anti-Semitism;

14. Calls on the OSCE participating states to develop educational material and teacher training methods to counter contemporary forms of anti-Semitism, as well as update programs on Holocaust education;

15. Urges both the national parliaments and governments of OSCE participating states to review their national laws;

16. Urges the OSCE participating states to improve security at Jewish sites and other locations that are potential targets of anti-Semitic attacks in coordination with the representatives of these communities.

No. 139. (three)

By the Honourable Senator Carstairs, P.C.:

November 1, 2005-That

Whereas the federal government has a leadership and coordination role, and a direct service delivery role for certain populations, with regards to palliative and end-of-life care in Canada;

And Whereas only 15 per cent of Canadians have access to integrated, palliative and end-of-life care;

The Senate of Canada urge the Government to provide long-term, sustainable funding for the further development of a Canadian Strategy on Palliative and End-of-Life Care which is cross-departmental and cross- jurisdictional, and meets the needs of Canadians; and

A message be sent to the House of Commons requesting that House to unite with the Senate for the above purpose.

No. 140. (three)

By the Honourable Senator Furey:

November 2, 2005-That the Clerk's Accounts, tabled on October 27, 2005, be referred to the Standing Committee on Internal Economy, Budgets and Administration.

No. 142. (three)

By the Honourable Senator Segal:

November 22, 2005-That the Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry be authorized to examine and report on rural poverty in Canada. In particular, the Committee shall be authorized to:

(a) examine the dimension and depth of rural poverty in Canada;

(b) conduct an assessment of Canada's comparative standing in this area, relative to other OECD countries;

(c) examine the key drivers of reduced opportunity for rural Canadians;

(d) provide recommendations for measures mitigating rural poverty and reduced opportunity for rural Canadians; and

That the Committee submit its final report no later than December 31, 2006.

No. 144. (one)

By the Honourable Senator Di Nino:

November 24, 2005-That the Senate support the declaration of the 4th World Parliamentarian's Convention on Tibet adopted by parliamentarians from 30 different countries on November 19, 2005 in Edinburgh, Scotland in support of Tibet's goal of genuine autonomy;

That the Senate support His Holiness the Dalai Lama's Middle Way approach to resolve the conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Tibetan government in exile through negotiations in the spirit of non-violence and reconciliation;

That the Senate commend the Chinese government in inviting the Dalai Lama's special envoys for four rounds of high-level meetings in Beijing and Berne between September 2002 and June 2005;

That the Senate support the creation of a zone of ahimsa (peace and non-violence) throughout the Tibetan plateau; and

That the Senate deplore the refusal of the Chinese government to release political prisoners, in particular the Panchen Lama, Gebhum Choekyi Nyima, who has been held in a secret location since 1995, when he was only 6 years old.

No. 145.

By the Honourable Senator Grafstein:

November 25, 2005-That, notwithstanding the Order of the Senate adopted on Tuesday, November 16, 2004, and the Order of the Senate adopted on Thursday, June 16, 2005, the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce, which was authorized to examine and report on consumer issues arising in the financial services sector, be empowered to extend the date of presenting its final report from November 30, 2005 to June 30, 2006: and

That the Committee retain until September 30, 2006 all powers necessary to publicize its findings.

No. 146.

By the Honourable Senator Grafstein:

November 25, 2005-That, notwithstanding the Order of the Senate adopted on Thursday, November 18, 2004, and the Order of the Senate adopted on Tuesday, March 22, 2005, the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce, which was authorized to examine and report on issues dealing with charitable giving in Canada, be empowered to extend the date of presenting its final report from November 30, 2005 to December 31, 2006: and

That the Committee retain until March 31, 2007 all powers necessary to publicize its findings.


QUESTIONS

No. 15.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

June 21, 2005-Regarding the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS)

1. Could the Government of Canada provide a copy of any briefing information that has been prepared since January 2004 for the Minister of Social Development or the Minister of State (Families and Caregivers) regarding eligible seniors who are not currently receiving the GIS benefit?

2. Could the Government of Canada provide a copy of any briefing information prepared since January 2004 for the Minister of Social Development or the Minister of State (Families and Caregivers) specifically for eligible seniors in Prince Edward Island who are not currently receiving the GIS benefit?

No. 16.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

June 21, 2005-Regarding Governor in Council Appointments

1. Could the Government of Canada provide a list of all of the Governor in Council (GIC) appointments for Prince Edward Island from December 1, 2003 to May 31, 2005?

2. Could the Government of Canada provide the name of the appointee, the board, agency, commission or other appointment he or she received and the length of the term?

No. 17.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

June 21, 2005-Regarding Ministerial Appointments

1. Could the Government of Canada provide a list of all Ministerial appointments for Prince Edward Island from December 1, 2003 to May 31, 2005?

2. Could the Government of Canada provide the name of the appointee, the appointment he or she received and the length of the term?

No. 18.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

June 21, 2005-Regarding the Canadian Consul General in New York:

1. Could the Government of Canada provide an explanation for the decision of the Canadian Consul General in New York to host a dinner on November 11, 2003 for Lord Conrad Black on the occasion of the publication of his book on the former United States President, Franklin D. Roosevelt?

2. Is it the policy for Canadian Foreign Affairs officials to spend Canadian tax dollars honouring someone who has renounced and rescinded their Canadian citizenship?

3. In addition to Canadian Consul General Pamela Wallin, Lord Black, and Lady Black, could the Government of Canada provide the names of any other guests who were invited to the November 11, 2003, dinner in honour of Lord Black?

No. 19.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

June 21, 2005-Regarding Government Decentralization

1. Could the Government of Canada provide a copy of any briefing material that has been prepared since December 2003 for the Prime Minister or any other minister regarding proposals to relocate government departments (or parts thereof), agencies and Crown corporations from the National Capital area to the regions of Canada?

2. Could the Government of Canada provide documents prepared by any government department since December 2003 assessing which government departments (or parts thereof), agencies or Crown corporations could be relocated from the National Capital area to the regions of Canada?

No. 23.

By the Honourable Senator Meighen:

November 3, 2005-With respect to the potential liquefied natural gas terminals on Passamaquoddy Bay and a study being initiated by the Government of Canada:

1. What are the terms of the study? Is the impact on Canadian sovereignty one of the elements being studied?

2. What is the projected completion date of the study?

3. What branch of what department is responsible for managing the research contracts or conducting the research?

4. Was the study put out to tender? If it was put out to tender, how many tender bids or submissions were received? What criteria were used to award the tender?

5. Who is conducting the study?

6. If the study is being conducted by an outside person or agency, who in the Department has met with that outside agency to discuss the terms of reference? When and where were the meetings held?

7. What other parties are being contacted for their views as part of this study?

8. Will public consultations be part of the study?

9. What is the total estimated cost of the study?

No. 24.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

November 22, 2005-Could the Minister of Public Works provide copies of all correspondence (including e-mails and notes to the Minister) pertaining to the decision to name the new federal building in Charlottetown the Jean Canfield Building?

No. 25

By the Honourable Senator Spivak:

November 23, 2005-1. With respect to the demolition of buildings located at 420 Meech Lake Road in 2001 and at the Alexander Property in 2000, were written proposals submitted to the National Capital Commission, in accordance with Section 12 of the National Capital Act?

2. If such proposals were prepared, on what date were they submitted, by whom, and can the National Capital Commission provide copies?

3. On what date were these submissions approved, by whom, and can the NCC provide copies of those approvals?

4. If no such proposals were submitted, why were they not submitted?

5. What are the NCC's contract stipulations concerning the acquisition by contractors of demolition permits for work performed on Gatineau Park properties?

6. Did the contractors who demolished the buildings located at 420 Meech Lake Road in 2001 and at the Alexander Property in 2000 obtain those permits?

7. What measures did the NCC take to verify whether contractors had acquired demolition permits for buildings located at 420 Meech Lake Road in 2001 and at the Alexander Property in 2000?

8. If the contractors who demolished the buildings located at 420 Meech Lake Road in 2001 and at the Alexander Property in 2000 did not obtain demolition permits, why did they not obtain them and what measures of redress has the NCC taken in this regard?

9. Who were the contractors hired by the NCC to demolish buildings located at 420 Meech Lake Road in 2001 and at the Alexander Property in 2000?

10. What is the number of acres and technical metes and bounds description for each property listed under numbers 59362 (Cecily Philips Chrzanowski) and 59264 (Roderick Fraser Sparks) used for the Skyline Parking Lot by virtue of the emphyteutic deed linking 3133591 Manitoba Ltd. and the NCC?

11. What is the number of acres and technical metes and bounds description for each property listed under numbers 6284 and 5033 (Roderick Percy Sparks) located at the base of the Skyline ski area by virtue of the emphyteutic deed linking 3133591 Manitoba Ltd. and the NCC?

12. What other properties located south of Meech Lake Road, mentioned in response no. 7, Sessional Paper No. 1/ 38-807-S and used as part of the Skyline Ski area, were included in the emphyteutic deed linking 3133591 Manitoba Ltd. and the NCC?

13. How many acres does each of those properties include?

14. Under which numbers are those properties listed with the Registry Office for the Registration Division of Gatineau?

15. For each fiscal year since 1988, what has been the total amount of the NCC Acquisition and Disposal Fund?

16. For each fiscal year since 1988, how much money from the NCC Acquisition and Disposal fund has been spent on acquiring properties in Gatineau Park?

17. For each fiscal year since 1988, how much money from the NCC Acquisition and Disposal Fund has been spent on other acquisitions?

18. What is the complete list of properties outside Gatineau Park acquired since 1988 through the NCC Acquisition and Disposal Fund, and how much money was drawn from that Fund to purchase each of those properties?

19. How many submissions did the NCC receive in its 1994 request for proposals to administer the Camp Fortune Ski Centre?

20. From whom did it receive proposals to administer the Camp Fortune Ski Centre?

21. What were the full contents of each of these proposals to administer the Camp Fortune Ski Centre?

22. Did any of these proposals to administer the Camp Fortune Ski Centre include plans to develop the Skyline properties located south of Meech Lake Road?

Please note that I wish to receive a response within 45 days of tabling these questions.



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