Order Papers and Notice Papers
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Issue 103

Wednesday, March 8, 2017
2 p.m.

Orders Of The Day | Notice Paper | Written Questions


The Order Paper and Notice Paper is a document that guides the deliberations of the Senate and lists items of business currently before it. These items are listed in several different categories and in a priority according to an arrangement adopted by the Senate as stipulated in the rules. The majority of these items constitute the Orders of the Day which are called following Routine Proceedings. These items are themselves divided into two principal categories - government business and other business. Within each of these two categories are items for bills, motions, inquiries and reports of committees.

The Notice Paper contains the text of motions and inquiries not yet called for debate.

The Order Paper and Notice Paper is prepared every day in advance of the actual sitting.


Order of Business

(The following is an outline of a typical sitting day in the Senate. Variations are possible subject to the Rules and to the decisions of the Senate.)

Senators' Statements (15 minutes)

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS (30 minutes)

1. Tabling of Documents

2. Presenting or Tabling Reports from Committees

3. Government Notices of Motions

4. Government Notices of Inquiries

5. Introduction and First Reading of Government Bills

6. Introduction and First Reading of Senate Public Bills

7. First Reading of Commons Public Bills

8. Reading of Petitions for Private Bills

9. Introduction and First Reading of Private Bills

10. Tabling of Reports from Interparliamentary Delegations

11. Notices of Motions

12. Notices of Inquiries

13. Tabling of Petitions

Question Period (30 minutes)

Delayed Answers

ORDERS OF THE DAY

Government Business

Bills — Messages from the House of Commons

Bills — Third Reading

Bills — Reports of Committees

Bills — Second Reading

Reports of Committees — Other

Motions

Inquiries

Other

Other Business

Bills — Messages from the House of Commons

Senate Public Bills — Third Reading

Commons Public Bills — Third Reading

Private Bills — Third Reading

Senate Public Bills — Reports of Committees

Commons Public Bills — Reports of Committees

Private Bills — Reports of Committees

Senate Public Bills — Second Reading

Commons Public Bills — Second Reading

Private Bills — Second Reading

Reports of Committees — Other

Motions

Inquiries

Other

NOTICE PAPER

Notices of Motions

Notices of Inquiries


Orders Of The Day

Government Business

Bills – Messages from the House of Commons

Nil


Bills – Third Reading

No. 1.

February 14, 2017—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, seconded by the Honourable Senator Harder, P.C., for the third reading of Bill C-4, An Act to amend the Canada Labour Code, the Parliamentary Employment and Staff Relations Act, the Public Service Labour Relations Act and the Income Tax Act.

No. 2.

March 7, 2017—Third reading of Bill C-6, An Act to amend the Citizenship Act and to make consequential amendments to another Act.


Bills – Reports of Committees

Nil


Bills – Second Reading

No. 1.

December 13, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Petitclerc, seconded by the Honourable Senator Lankin, P.C., for the second reading of Bill S-5, An Act to amend the Tobacco Act and the Non-smokers’ Health Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts.

No. 2.

March 2, 2017—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Eggleton, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Day, for the second reading of Bill C-18, An Act to amend the Rouge National Urban Park Act, the Parks Canada Agency Act and the Canada National Parks Act.

No. 3.

February 28, 2017—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Campbell, seconded by the Honourable Senator Pratte, for the second reading of Bill C-37, An Act to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and to make related amendments to other Acts.


Reports of Committees – Other

Nil


Motions

No. 1.

December 8, 2015—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Jaffer, seconded by the Honourable Senator Cordy:

That the following Address be presented to His Excellency the Governor General of Canada:

To His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Chancellor and Principal Companion of the Order of Canada, Chancellor and Commander of the Order of Military Merit, Chancellor and Commander of the Order of Merit of the Police Forces, Governor General and Commander-in-Chief of Canada.

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY:

We, Her Majesty’s most loyal and dutiful subjects, the Senate of Canada in Parliament assembled, beg leave to offer our humble thanks to Your Excellency for the gracious Speech which Your Excellency has addressed to both Houses of Parliament.


Inquiries

No. 1.

By the Honourable Senator Harder, P.C.:

April 13, 2016—That he will call the attention of the Senate to the budget entitled Growing the Middle Class, tabled in the House of Commons on March 22, 2016, by the Minister of Finance, the Honourable Bill Morneau, P.C., M.P., and in the Senate on March 24, 2016.


Other

Nil


Other Business

Rule 4-15(2) states:

Except as otherwise ordered by the Senate, any item of Other Business on the Order Paper and any motion or inquiry on the Notice Paper that have not been proceeded with during 15 sitting days shall be dropped from the Order Paper and Notice Paper.

Consequently, the number appearing in parentheses indicates the number of sittings since the item was last proceeded with.

Bills – Messages from the House of Commons

Nil


Senate Public Bills – Third Reading

No. 1. (nine)

February 7, 2017—Third reading of Bill S-226, An Act to provide for the taking of restrictive measures in respect of foreign nationals responsible for gross violations of internationally recognized human rights and to make related amendments to the Special Economic Measures Act and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.—(Honourable Senator Downe)


Commons Public Bills – Third Reading

No. 1.

March 7, 2017—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Lankin, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Petitclerc, for the third reading of Bill C-210, An Act to amend the National Anthem Act (gender).—(Honourable Senator Fraser)


Private Bills – Third Reading

Nil


Senate Public Bills – Reports of Committees

Nil


Commons Public Bills – Reports of Committees

No. 1.

March 7, 2017—Consideration of the twelfth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs (Bill C-224, An Act to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (assistance — drug overdose), with amendments and observations), presented in the Senate on March 7, 2017.—(Honourable Senator Baker, P.C.)


Private Bills – Reports of Committees

Nil


Senate Public Bills – Second Reading

No. 1.

February 2, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Hervieux-Payette, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C., for the second reading of Bill S-206, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (protection of children against standard child-rearing violence).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 2. (one)

March 24, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Patterson, seconded by the Honourable Senator Enverga, for the second reading of Bill S-221, An Act to amend the Constitution Act, 1867 (Property qualifications of Senators).—(Honourable Senator Ringuette)

No. 3. (four)

December 8, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Frum, seconded by the Honourable Senator Pratte, for the second reading of Bill S-232, An Act respecting Canadian Jewish Heritage Month.—(Honourable Senator Jaffer)

No. 4. (thirteen)

December 15, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Moore, seconded by the Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C., for the second reading of Bill S-234, An Act to amend the Parliament of Canada Act (Parliamentary Artist Laureate).—(Honourable Senator Bovey)

No. 5. (thirteen)

December 15, 2016—Second reading of Bill S-235, An Act to amend the Prohibiting Cluster Munitions Act (investments).—(Honourable Senator Ataullahjan)


Commons Public Bills – Second Reading

No. 1. (eight)

February 7, 2017—Second reading of Bill C-233, An Act respecting a national strategy for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 2. (five)

February 15, 2017—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Cordy, seconded by the Honourable Senator Dawson, for the second reading of Bill C-238, An Act respecting the development of a national strategy for the safe and environmentally sound disposal of lamps containing mercury.—(Honourable Senator Martin)


Private Bills – Second Reading

Nil


Reports of Committees – Other

No. 1. (ten)

November 15, 2016—Resuming debate on the consideration of the first report (interim) of the Special Senate Committee on Senate Modernization, entitled Senate Modernization: Moving Forward, deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on October 4, 2016.—(Honourable Senator Bellemare)

No. 2. (one)

October 6, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Eggleton, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Day, for the adoption of the third report (interim) of the Special Senate Committee on Senate Modernization, entitled Senate Modernization: Moving Forward (Committees), presented in the Senate on October 4, 2016.

And on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Tannas, seconded by the Honourable Senator Unger:

That the Third Report of the Special Senate Committee on Senate Modernization be not now adopted, but that it be amended by replacing the third paragraph, starting with the words “That the Senate direct”, with the following:

“That:

1. the Clerk of the Senate be instructed to prepare and recommend to the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament draft amendments to the Rules of the Senate to change the process for determining the composition of the Committee of Selection and each standing committee, using the process set out below as the basis for such amendments and taking into consideration the objectives identified by the committee and the principles underlying those objectives; and

2. the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament examine and consider those recommendations and report to the Senate with its recommendations.”.

And on the subamendment of the Honourable Senator Eggleton, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C.:

That the motion in amendment be not now adopted, but that it be amended by replacing the words “report to the Senate” by the words “report to the Senate by May 1, 2017,”.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 3. (five)

October 27, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McCoy, seconded by the Honourable Senator Ringuette, for the adoption of the fifth report (interim) of the Special Senate Committee on Senate Modernization, entitled Senate Modernization: Moving Forward (Caucus), presented in the Senate on October 4, 2016.

And on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Ringuette, seconded by the Honourable Senator McCoy:

That the report be not now adopted, but that it be amended:

1.by replacing the paragraph starting with the words “That the Senate direct the Committee on Rules” by the following:

“That the Senate direct the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament and the Standing Committee on Internal Economy, Budgets and Administration to draft amendments to the Rules of the Senate and the Senate Administrative Rules, and to report thereon to the Senate by May 9, 2017, respecting the following:”; and

2.by replacing the paragraph starting with the words “That the Senate direct the Committee on Internal” by the following:

“That the Senate direct the Standing Committee on Internal Economy, Budgets and Administration to prepare amendments to the Senate Administrative Rules, and to report thereon to the Senate by May 9, 2017, to provide all groups (caucuses) of senators with funding for a secretariat and research projects, regardless of whether the caucuses are organized with or without political affiliations.”.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 4. (thirteen)

November 24, 2016—Resuming debate on the consideration of the eighth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs, entitled Delaying Justice is Denying Justice: An Urgent Need to Address Lengthy Court Delays in Canada, deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on August 12, 2016.—(Honourable Senator Runciman)

No. 5. (twelve)

November 2, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Tannas, seconded by the Honourable Senator Wells, for the adoption of the sixth report (interim) of the Special Senate Committee on Senate Modernization, entitled Senate Modernization: Moving Forward (Speakership), presented in the Senate on October 5, 2016.—(Honourable Senator Day)

No. 6. (one)

November 22, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Massicotte, seconded by the Honourable Senator Moore for the adoption of the seventh report (interim), as amended, of the Special Senate Committee on Senate Modernization, entitled Senate Modernization: Moving Forward (Regional interest), presented in the Senate on October 18, 2016.—(Honourable Senator Ringuette)

No. 7. (three)

February 28, 2017—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Frum, seconded by the Honourable Senator Beyak for the adoption of the ninth report (interim) of the Special Senate Committee on Senate Modernization, entitled Senate Modernization: Moving Forward (Question Period), presented in the Senate on October 25, 2016.—(Honourable Senator Ringuette)

No. 8. (fourteen)

December 12, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Cordy, for the adoption of the tenth report (interim) of the Special Senate Committee on Senate Modernization, entitled Senate Modernization: Moving Forward (Nature), presented in the Senate on October 26, 2016.—(Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C.)

No. 9.

February 8, 2017—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Munson, seconded by the Honourable Senator Cordy:

That the fifth report, Finding Refuge in Canada: A Syrian Resettlement Story, of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights, deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on Tuesday, December 6, 2016, be adopted and that, pursuant to rule 12-24(1), the Senate request a complete and detailed response from the government, with the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship being identified as minister responsible for responding to the report, in consultation with the Minister of National Revenue.—(Honourable Senator Andreychuk)

No. 10.

March 7, 2017—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator MacDonald, seconded by the Honourable Senator Patterson:

That the sixth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Transport and Communications, entitled Pipelines for Oil: Protecting our Economy, Respecting our Environment, deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on December 7, 2016 be adopted and that, pursuant to rule 12-24(1), the Senate request a complete and detailed response from the government, with the Minister of Natural Resources being identified as minister responsible for responding to the report, in consultation with the Ministers of Transport and Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard.—(Honourable Senator Mercer)

No. 11. (eight)

February 7, 2017—Consideration of the seventh report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade, entitled Free Trade Agreements: A Tool for Economic Prosperity, deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on February 7, 2017.—(Honourable Senator Downe)

No. 12.

March 7, 2017—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Smith, seconded by the Honourable Senator Ataullahjan:

That the twelfth report of the Standing Senate Committee on National Finance entitled Smarter Planning, Smarter Spending: Achieving infrastructure success, tabled with the Clerk of the Senate on February 28, 2017 be adopted and that, pursuant to rule 12-24(1), the Senate request a complete and detailed response from the government, with the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities being identified as minister responsible for responding to the report.—(Honourable Senator Bellemare)

No. 13.

March 7, 2017—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Dyck, seconded by the Honourable Senator Watt:

That the fifth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples entitled We can do Better: Housing in Inuit Nunangat, deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on Wednesday, March 1, 2017 be adopted and that, pursuant to rule 12-24(1), the Senate request a complete and detailed response from the government, with the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development (Minister responsible for the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation) being identified as minister responsible for responding to the report, in consultation with the Ministers of Indigenous and Northern Affairs, Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, Innovation, Science and Economic Development, and the President of the Treasury Board.—(Honourable Senator Patterson)

No. 14.

March 7, 2017—Consideration of the fifth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources, entitled Positioning Canada’s Electricity Sector in a Carbon Constrained Future, deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on March 7, 2017.—(Honourable Senator Massicotte)

No. 15.

March 7, 2017—Consideration of the fourth report (interim) of the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament, entitled Sessional Order, presented in the Senate on March 7, 2017.—(Honourable Senator Fraser)


Motions

No. 31. (nine)

February 2, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, seconded by the Honourable Senator Enverga:

That the Senate — in order to ensure transparency in the awarding of public funds and foster efficiency in infrastructure projects in the larger context of economic diversification and movement toward a greener economy, all while avoiding undue intervention in the federal-provincial division of powers — encourage the government to make provision in the budget for the creation of the Canadian Infrastructure Oversight and Best Practices Council, made up of experts in infrastructure projects from the provinces and territories, whose principal roles would be to:

1.collect information on federally funded infrastructure projects;

2. study the costs and benefits of federally funded infrastructure projects;

3. identify procurements best practices and of risk sharing;

4. promote these best practices among governments; and

5. promote project managers skills development; and

That a message be sent to the House of Commons to acquaint that House with the above.—(Honourable Senator Wells)

No. 51.

February 25, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Eggleton, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Dawson:

That the Senate encourage the federal government, after appropriate consultations, to sponsor along with one or more of the provinces/territories a pilot project, and any complementary studies, to evaluate the cost and impact of implementing a national basic income program based on a negative income tax for the purpose of helping Canadians to escape poverty.

And on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, seconded by the Honourable Senator Harder, P.C.:

That the motion be amended to read as follows:

That the Senate encourage the federal government, after appropriate consultations, to provide support to initiatives by provinces/territories, including the Aboriginal Communities, aimed at evaluating the cost and impact of implementing measures, programs and pilot projects for the purpose of helping Canadians to escape poverty, by way of a basic income program (such as a negative income tax) and to report on their relative efficiency.—(Honourable Senator Woo)

No. 73. (eleven)

March 24, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Patterson, seconded by the Honourable Senator Runciman:

Whereas the Senate provides representation for groups that are often underrepresented in Parliament, such as Aboriginal peoples, visible minorities and women;

Whereas paragraph (3) of section 23 of the Constitution Act, 1867 requires that, in order to be qualified for appointment to and to maintain a place in the Senate, a person must own land with a net worth of at least four thousand dollars in the province for which he or she is appointed;

Whereas a person’s personal circumstances or the availability of real property in a particular location may prevent him or her from owning the required property;

Whereas appointment to the Senate should not be restricted to those who own real property of a minimum net worth;

Whereas the existing real property qualification is inconsistent with the democratic values of modern Canadian society and is no longer an appropriate or relevant measure of the fitness of a person to serve in the Senate;

Whereas, in the case of Quebec, each of the twenty-four Senators representing the province must be appointed for and must have either their real property qualification in or be resident of a specified Electoral Division;

Whereas an amendment to the Constitution of Canada in relation to any provision that applies to one or more, but not all, provinces may be made by proclamation issued by the Governor General under the Great Seal of Canada only where so authorized by resolutions of the Senate and House of Commons and of the legislative assembly of each province to which the amendment applies;

Whereas the Supreme Court of Canada has determined that a full repeal of paragraph (3) of section 23 of the Constitution Act, 1867, respecting the real property qualification of Senators, would require a resolution of the Quebec National Assembly pursuant to section 43 of the Constitution Act, 1982;

Now, therefore, the Senate resolves that an amendment to the Constitution of Canada be authorized to be made by proclamation issued by His Excellency the Governor General under the Great Seal of Canada in accordance with the Schedule hereto.

SCHEDULE

AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF CANADA

1.(1) Paragraph (3) of section 23 of the Constitution Act, 1867 is repealed.

(2) Section 23 of the Act is amended by replacing the semi-colon at the end of paragraph (5) with a period and by repealing paragraph (6).

2.The Declaration of Qualification set out in The Fifth Schedule to the Act is replaced by the following:

I, A.B., do declare and testify that I am by law duly qualified to be appointed a member of the Senate of Canada.

3.This Amendment may be cited as the Constitution Amendment, [year of proclamation] (Real property qualification of Senators).—(Honourable Senator Maltais)

No. 89.

May 12, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, seconded by the Honourable Senator Harder, P.C.:

That, in order to ensure that legislative reports of Senate committees follow a transparent, comprehensible and non-partisan methodology, the Rules of the Senate be amended by replacing rule 12-23(1) by the following:

“Obligation to report bill

12-23. (1) The committee to which a bill has been referred shall report the bill to the Senate. The report shall set out any amendments that the committee is recommending.  In addition, the report shall have appended to it the committee’s observations on:

(a) whether the bill generally conforms with the Constitution of Canada, including:

(i) the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and

(ii) the division of legislative powers between Parliament and the provincial and territorial legislatures;

(b) whether the bill conforms with treaties and international agreements that Canada has signed or ratified;

(c) whether the bill unduly impinges on any minority or economically disadvantaged groups;

(d) whether the bill has any impact on one or more provinces or territories;

(e) whether the appropriate consultations have been conducted;

(f) whether the bill contains any obvious drafting errors;

(g) all amendments moved but not adopted in the committee, including the text of these amendments; and

(h) any other matter that, in the committee’s opinion, should be brought to the attention of the Senate.”

And on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Nancy Ruth, seconded by the Honourable Senator Tkachuk:

That the motion be not now adopted, but that it be amended by:

1.adding the following new subsection after proposed subsection (c):

“(d) whether the bill has received substantive gender-based analysis;”; and

2.by changing the designation for current proposed subsections (d) to (h) to (e) to (i).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 92. (six)

May 17, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Ngo, seconded by the Honourable Senator Cowan:

That the Senate note with concern the escalating and hostile behaviour exhibited by the People’s Republic of China in the South China Sea and consequently urge the Government of Canada to encourage all parties involved, and in particular the People’s Republic of China, to:

(a) recognize and uphold the rights of freedom of navigation and overflight as enshrined in customary international law and in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea;

(b) cease all activities that would complicate or escalate the disputes, such as the construction of artificial islands, land reclamation, and further militarization of the region;

(c) abide by all previous multilateral efforts to resolve the disputes and commit to the successful implementation of a binding Code of Conduct in the South China Sea;

(d) commit to finding a peaceful and diplomatic solution to the disputes in line with the provisions of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea and respect the settlements reached through international arbitration; and

(e) strengthen efforts to significantly reduce the environmental impacts of the disputes upon the fragile ecosystem of the South China Sea;

That the Senate also urge the Government of Canada to support its regional partners and allies and to take additional steps necessary to de-escalate tensions and restore the peace and stability of the region; and

That a message be sent to the House of Commons to acquaint it with the foregoing.—(Honourable Senator Ringuette)

No. 139.

February 7, 2017—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Eggleton, P.C.:

That with Canada celebrating 150 years as a nation and acknowledging the lasting contribution of the First Nations, early settlers, and the continuing immigration of peoples from around the world who have made and continue to make Canada the great nation that it is, the Senate urge the Government to commit to establishing a National Portrait Gallery using the former US Embassy across from Parliament Hill as a lasting legacy to mark this important milestone in Canada’s history and in recognition of the people who contributed to its success.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 146. (thirteen)

December 12, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Ringuette, seconded by the Honourable Senator Lankin, P.C.:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade, and Commerce be authorized to:

(a)Review the operations of the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada (FCAC), the Ombudsman for Banking Services and Investments (OBSI), and ADR Chambers Banking Ombuds Office (ADRBO);

(b)Review the agencies’ interaction with and respect for provincial jurisdictions;

(c)Review and determine best practices from similar agencies in other jurisdictions;

(d)Provide recommendations to ensure that the FCAC, OBSI, and ADRBO can better protect consumers and respect provincial jurisdiction; and

That the Committee submit its final report no later than May 31, 2017, and retain all powers necessary to publicize its findings until 180 days after the tabling of the final report.—(Honourable Senator Tkachuk)

No. 158. (four)

February 7, 2017—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Merchant, seconded by the Honourable Senator Housakos:

That the Senate call upon the government of Canada:

(a) to recognize the genocide of the Pontic Greeks of 1916 to 1923 and to condemn any attempt to deny or distort a historical truth as being anything less than genocide, a crime against humanity; and

(b) to designate May 19th of every year hereafter throughout Canada as a day of remembrance of the over 353,000 Pontic Greeks who were killed or expelled from their homes.—(Honourable Senator Cools)


Inquiries

No. 1. (twelve)

December 10, 2015—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Chaput, calling the attention of the Senate to the Program to Support Linguistic Rights, the importance of ensuring public financing of court actions that seek to create a fair and just society and to the urgent need for the federal government to re-establish the Court Challenges Program.—(Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C.)

No. 2. (ten)

March 9, 2016—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Jaffer, calling the attention of the Senate to the human rights implications of climate change, and how it will affect the most vulnerable in Canada and the world by threatening their right to food, water, health, adequate shelter, life, and self-determination.—(Honourable Senator Gold)

No. 8. (three)

May 5, 2016—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, calling the attention of the Senate to the Senate’s legislative work from the 24th to the 41st Parliament and on elements of evaluation.—(Honourable Senator Andreychuk)

No. 11. (eight)

June 20, 2016—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Tardif, calling the attention of the Senate to the Trans Canada Trail — its history, benefits and the challenges it is faced with as it approaches its 25th anniversary.—(Honourable Senator Petitclerc)

No. 12. (three)

May 18, 2016—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Seidman, calling the attention of the Senate to its role in the protection of regional and minority representation.—(Honourable Senator Ataullahjan)

No. 13. (thirteen)

October 25, 2016—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, calling the attention of the Senate to the relevance of full employment in the 21st century in a Globalized economy.—(Honourable Senator Mitchell)

No. 14. (five)

November 29, 2016—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Hubley, calling the attention of the Senate to the current state of literacy and literacy programs on Prince Edward Island, including the need for federal support of the PEI Literacy Alliance.—(Honourable Senator Marshall)

No. 15. (ten)

October 25, 2016—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Maltais, calling the attention of the Senate to the softwood lumber crisis.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 16. (twelve)

December 13, 2016—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Meredith, calling the attention of the Senate to the increasing rates of violence in Canada’s urban centres and to the causes of this increase, and to some possible strategies to deal with this serious problem.—(Honourable Senator Meredith)

No. 17. (twelve)

December 13, 2016—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Meredith, calling the attention of the Senate to the Canadian Temporary Foreign Workers Program, including the living and working conditions of workers and their access to health care.—(Honourable Senator Meredith)

No. 18. (two)

December 1, 2016—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Mockler, calling the attention of the Senate to the issue of pipeline safety in Canada, and the nation-building project that is the Energy East proposal, and its resulting impact on the Canadian economy.—(Honourable Senator Mercer)

No. 19.

December 8, 2016—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Pate, calling the attention of the Senate to the circumstances of some of the most marginalized, victimized, criminalized and institutionalized in Canada, particularly the increasing over-representation of Indigenous women in Canadian prisons.—(Honourable Senator Boniface)

No. 20. (four)

February 14, 2017—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Tardif, calling the attention of the Senate to regional universities and the important role they play in Canada.—(Honourable Senator Gagné)


Other

Nil


Notice Paper

Motions

No. 174. (two)

By the Honourable Senator Enverga:

February 28, 2017—That the Rules of the Senate be amended by replacing rule 4 by the following:

“Prayers and National Anthem

4-1.(1) The Speaker shall proceed to Prayers as soon as a quorum is seen, and, on a Tuesday, shall then call upon a Senator or guests to lead in singing the bilingual version of O Canada.

Guest singers

4-1.(2) The Speaker may invite guests to enter the galleries to lead in singing the National Anthem.”

No. 177. (two)

By the Honourable Senator Dawson:

March 1, 2017—That, notwithstanding the order of the Senate adopted on Wednesday, March 9, 2016, the date for the final report of the Standing Senate Committee on Transport and Communications in relation to its study on the regulatory and technical issues related to the deployment of connected and automated vehicles be extended from March 30, 2017 to December 31, 2017.

No. 179. (one)

By the Honourable Senator Andreychuk:

March 2, 2017—That, notwithstanding the order of the Senate adopted on Tuesday, March 22, 2016, the date for the final report of the Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade in relation to its study on opportunities for strengthening cooperation with Mexico be extended from March 31, 2017 to October 31, 2017.

No. 180. (one)

By the Honourable Senator Andreychuk:

March 2, 2017—That, notwithstanding the order of the Senate adopted on Tuesday, March 22, 2016, the date for the final report of the Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade in relation to its study on recent political and economic developments in Argentina be extended from May 31, 2017 to October 31, 2017.

No. 181.

By the Honourable Senator Tardif:

March 7, 2017—That, notwithstanding the order of the Senate adopted on Thursday, December 1, 2016, the date for the final report of the Standing Senate Committee on Official Languages in relation to its study on the challenges associated with access to French-language schools and French immersion programs in British Columbia be extended from March 30, 2017 to May 31, 2017.

No. 182.

By the Honourable Senator Munson:

March 7, 2017—That the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights be authorized to examine and monitor issues relating to human rights and, inter alia, to review the machinery of government dealing with Canada’s international and national human rights obligations;

That the papers and evidence received and taken and work accomplished by the committee on this subject since the beginning of the First Session of the Thirty-seventh Parliament be referred to the committee; and

That the committee submit its final report to the Senate no later than March 31, 2018.


Inquiries

Nil


Written Questions

No. 19.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

October 25, 2016—With respect to Veterans Affairs Canada:

In his response tabled on September 29th, 2016 to my Written Question, the Minister for Veterans Affairs indicated that 19 of the 61 senior management positions in Veterans Affairs Canada are not located at VAC National Headquarters in Charlottetown Prince Edward Island.

Regarding those 19 senior managers:

1.Who are these senior managers, identified by name, position title and salary range for each position?

2.Please provide a detailed list of the actual days that each of those 19 senior managers identified by the minister worked in Ottawa and how many days they worked at the National Headquarters in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island since their respective appointments.

No. 21.

By the Honourable Senator Cordy:

November 16, 2016—Hundreds of thousands of Canadians receive a Canada Pension Plan Disability Benefit due to a severe and prolonged diagnosis. For many who receive this benefit, it is their sole source of dependable financial support.

The Canada Pension Plan Disability Benefit Program does allow for those recipients who may be able to work part time, the option to earn up to $5400 a year before taxes (roughly 10 per cent of maximum pensionable earnings) before a penalty is incurred to their benefit.

As a result of this, some recipients do not actively seek out part time employment opportunities for fear of losing their CPP disability benefit. This is unfortunate, as many recipients, especially those with dependants, are living at or near the poverty line. Allowing recipients to supplement their disability benefit with additional income, when able, would help these Canadians provide better for their families.

1.What factors or criteria were considered by the government when it determined the annual allowable earnings amount to be 10 per cent of maximum annual pensionable earnings?

2.The Government of Canada website states that the $5400 (before taxes) earnings limit “may increase in future years”. Since 2002, has the government of Canada revisited this limit and considered changing the earnings cap?

a.If so, when was this and why was the 10 per cent of maximum pensionable earnings cap maintained?

b.If not, does the Government of Canada have plans to consider increasing the earnings cap?

3.What factors prevent the Government of Canada from allowing recipients to earn more than 10 per cent of their maximum pensionable earnings without incurring a penalty to their benefit?

No. 25.

By the Honourable Senator Carignan, P.C.:

December 14, 2016—Regarding Ministerial Appointments:

1.Could the Government of Canada provide a list of all Ministerial appointments for each province and territory from October 2015 to November 2016?

2.Could the Government of Canada provide the name of the appointee, the appointment received, and the length of the term?

No. 26.

By the Honourable Senator Carignan, P.C.:

December 14, 2016—Regarding Governor in Council (GIC) Appointments:

1.Could the Government of Canada provide a list of all Governor in Council appointments for each province and territory from October 2015 to November 2016?

2.Could the Government of Canada provide the name of the appointee, the appointment received, and the length of the term?

No. 27.

By the Honourable Senator Carignan, P.C.:

December 14, 2016—Regarding the National Seniors Council:

1.What is the current status of the National Seniors Council?

2.If the Council is active, who are its members?

3.Is the Council currently providing advice to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development or the Minister of Health?

No. 28.

By the Honourable Senator Carignan, P.C.:

December 14, 2016—Concerning the program Growing Forward 2 (GF2):

1.How much did the Government of Canada spend per year and per province under this program?

2.In which program sectors of activities was this money spent?

3.Does the government intend to renew this program when it expires?

No. 31.

By the Honourable Senator Carignan, P.C.:

December 14, 2016—What are the implementation costs estimated by the federal government for a system to legalize marijuana in Canada?

Specifically, what is the breakdown of costs estimated by the government for each of the first three years following legalization in these areas:

1.Health care:

(a)hospitalization associated to marijuana;

(b)treatment programs;

(c)awareness programs; and

(d)injuries caused by marijuana-impaired driving;

2.Justice and safety:

(a)border control;

(b)public transportation safety; and

(c)drug treatment courts.

For each category, what studies did the government use to make its cost projections?

No. 32.

By the Honourable Senator Carignan, P.C.:

December 14, 2016—What are the government’s projections concerning the number of deaths caused by marijuana-impaired driving for each of the first three years following the legalization of marijuana? What studies did the government use to make its projections?

No. 33.

By the Honourable Senator Carignan, P.C.:

December 14, 2016—Concerning the legalization of marijuana, since November 4, 2015:

1.Which groups, public organizations, individuals and governments asked to be consulted for each of the following departments: Health, Justice and Public Safety?

2.For each of the abovementioned departments, which groups, public organizations, individuals and governments were consulted?

3.What studies did the government commission?

No. 35.

By the Honourable Senator Carignan, P.C.:

December 14, 2016—Can the government provide the following documents and information with regards to Syrian refugees, since November 4, 2015 to the present:

(a)how many have arrived in Canada;

(b)in which regions and cities have the refugees re-settled in Canada;

(c)how many are living in temporary housing;

(d)what is the total cost of flights, accommodations, per diems and allowances;

(e)how many refugees were privately sponsored;

(f)how many refugees were government sponsored;

(g)how many are still unemployed;

(h)how many are relying on food banks;

(i)how many are men;

(j)how many are women; and

(k)how many are under the age of 18?

No. 36.

By the Honourable Senator Carignan, P.C.:

December 14, 2016—Regarding the Marine Protected Areas (MPA):

1.What is the percentage of Canada’s marine and coastal areas that are included in the MPA?

2.When will the government reach its target of five per cent?

3.Has the government conducted any study on the impact of the increase in MPA?

No. 37.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

January 31, 2017—In a statement published in the Ottawa Citizen on December 17, 2016 a spokesperson for the Minister of Veterans Affairs stated that “a position to lead the recruitment of veterans within the department has now been created and a veteran appointed to that job”.

Regarding this position:

1.Who has been appointed to fill this position?

2. What is this person’s military experience, including rank upon release from the Canadian Armed Forces?

3. When was this position created?

4. When was this position filled?

5. What is the salary range for this position?

6. Where is this position located?

No. 38.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

January 31, 2017—Since 2005, qualified medically released Canadian Forces (CF) veterans have been eligible for priority employment appointments in the federal public service. The answer to Senate Written Question No.10 (tabled on November 28, 2016) indicated that between January 1, 2005 and May 1, 2016, 1956 medically released CF members activated their priority status. Of that number, 585 lost their priority status before they could find such employment.

For the period from January 1, 2005, to May 1, 2016:

1.How many members of the Canadian Forces have been medically released, by rank upon date of release;

2.How many of these qualified medically released members have applied for a priority employment appointment in the federal public service, by rank upon date of release;

3.How many have received a priority employment appointment, by rank upon date of release;

4.How many were still on the priority employment appointment list when their eligibility period expired, by rank upon date of release, and;

5.How many qualified medically released Canadian Forces veterans were hired by each federal Government department, by rank upon date of release?

No. 39.

By the Honourable Senator Griffin:

January 31, 2017—The Prime Minister has given all Canadians free Parks Canada passes as part of the Canada 150 Confederation celebrations. The free passes will result in a significant increase in attendance at national parks. Parks Canada has developed contingency plans to hire additional summer students to address the projected increase of visitors to National Parks like Banff or Cavendish.

The hiring of additional students involves payroll processing using Phoenix. Last summer, a significant number of students experienced Phoenix related payroll problems where some students are still experiencing payroll irregularities into 2017.

A second summer where students are not paid on time, combined with an increase in the number of summer students that need processing, may frustrate the practical implementation of the Prime Minister’s free Parks Canada passes commitment. Students are particularly vulnerable as they cannot easily access their payroll information post-employment and they must have access to a certain amount of money in the fall for university.

1.What steps is Parks Canada taking to address any Phoenix related payroll issues for summer students?

2.Is Parks Canada assigning dedicated payroll and benefits officers to process students’ payroll information?

No. 40.

By the Honourable Senator Griffin:

January 31, 2017—All Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) provinces have individual Comprehensive Integrated Tax Coordination Agreements with the Government of Canada. A recent news article in the Charlottetown Guardian indicated that the federal government recalculated HST revenues and that the Atlantic provinces have been overpaid. The federal government is requesting that all Atlantic provinces repay hundreds of millions of dollars in HST revenues so that Ottawa can redistribute this money to Ontario which also uses the HST.

To ensure a factual understanding of the issue, I ask the following:

1.A breakdown by each Atlantic province of the amount the Government of Canada deems is an overpayment to that province.

2.Will the federal government redistribute this overpayment to Ontario, the only other HST province?

No. 41.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

February 14, 2017—With regard to goods in transit (goods passing through Canada but not destined for sale or consumption in Canada):

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) acknowledged in an answer to a Written Question tabled February 7, 2017 that for the period of January 1, 2010 to December 8, 2016, there have been instances where goods in transit have been diverted from their original destination and may have ended up being consumed, sold, spilled or otherwise released into Canada.

1.What are the details of these diversions?

2.How many such diversions took place?

3.When did they take place? 

4.Where did they take place? 

5.What were the goods that were diverted?

6.Did they result from theft or were they accidental (a spill, for example)?

7.What was the impact of these diversions (health, environmental, economic)?

CBSA has stated that it “does not maintain statistics for unreported diverted goods because procedures are in place to ensure that unauthorized goods that transit through Canada are not diverted into the Canadian market.” However, in the same statement, it acknowledged that “there have been instances where goods in transit have been diverted.”

1.In the absence of statistics, how does CBSA know goods have been diverted?

2.Does CBSA have any other means of knowing about diversions of goods other than receiving reports from the shipper?