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Issue 308

Friday, June 21, 2019
1:30 p.m.

Orders Of The Day | Notice Paper | Written Questions


The Order Paper and Notice Paper is a document that guides the deliberations of the Senate and lists items of business currently before it. These items are listed in several different categories and in a priority according to an arrangement adopted by the Senate as stipulated in the rules. The majority of these items constitute the Orders of the Day which are called following Routine Proceedings. These items are themselves divided into two principal categories - government business and other business. Within each of these two categories are items for bills, motions, inquiries and reports of committees.

The Notice Paper contains the text of motions and inquiries not yet called for debate.

The Order Paper and Notice Paper is prepared every day in advance of the actual sitting.


Order of Business

(The following is an outline of a typical sitting day in the Senate. Variations are possible subject to the Rules and to the decisions of the Senate.)

Senators' Statements (15 minutes)

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS (30 minutes)

1. Tabling of Documents

2. Presenting or Tabling Reports from Committees

3. Government Notices of Motions

4. Government Notices of Inquiries

5. Introduction and First Reading of Government Bills

6. Introduction and First Reading of Senate Public Bills

7. First Reading of Commons Public Bills

8. Reading of Petitions for Private Bills

9. Introduction and First Reading of Private Bills

10. Tabling of Reports from Interparliamentary Delegations

11. Notices of Motions

12. Notices of Inquiries

13. Tabling of Petitions

Question Period (30 minutes)

Delayed Answers

ORDERS OF THE DAY

Government Business

Bills — Messages from the House of Commons

Bills — Third Reading

Bills — Reports of Committees

Bills — Second Reading

Reports of Committees — Other

Motions

Inquiries

Other

Other Business

Bills — Messages from the House of Commons

Senate Public Bills — Third Reading

Commons Public Bills — Third Reading

Private Bills — Third Reading

Senate Public Bills — Reports of Committees

Commons Public Bills — Reports of Committees

Private Bills — Reports of Committees

Senate Public Bills — Second Reading

Commons Public Bills — Second Reading

Private Bills — Second Reading

Reports of Committees — Other

Motions

Inquiries

Other

NOTICE PAPER

Notices of Motions

Notices of Inquiries


Orders Of The Day

Government Business

Bills – Messages from the House of Commons

Nil


Bills – Third Reading

Nil


Bills – Reports of Committees

Nil


Bills – Second Reading

For Monday, June 24, 2019

No. 1.

June 20, 2019—Second reading of Bill C-98, An Act to amend the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act and the Canada Border Services Agency Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts.


Reports of Committees – Other

No. 22.

November 27, 2018—Consideration of the twenty-eighth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs (Subject matter of Bill C-86, A second Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures), tabled in the Senate on November 27, 2018.

No. 23.

November 27, 2018—Consideration of the twentieth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade (Subject matter of Bill C-86, A second Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures), tabled in the Senate on November 27, 2018.

No. 24.

November 29, 2018—Consideration of the thirtieth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology (Subject matter of Bill C-86, A second Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures), tabled in the Senate on November 29, 2018.

No. 25.

February 20, 2019—Resuming debate on the consideration of the eighteenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources (Subject matter of Bill C-86, A second Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures), tabled in the Senate on November 29, 2018.

No. 26.

December 3, 2018—Consideration of the fourteenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples (Subject matter of Bill C-86, A second Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures), tabled in the Senate on December 3, 2018.

No. 27.

December 4, 2018—Consideration of the twenty-sixth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce (Subject matter of Bill C-86, A second Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures), tabled in the Senate on December 4, 2018.

No. 28.

December 4, 2018—Consideration of the fourteenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Transport and Communications (Subject matter of Bill C-86, A second Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures), tabled in the Senate on December 4, 2018.

No. 33.

May 30, 2019—Resuming debate on the consideration of the sixteenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples (Subject matter of Bill C-91, An Act respecting Indigenous languages), tabled in the Senate on April 30, 2019.

No. 34.

May 30, 2019—Resuming debate on the consideration of the seventeenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples (Subject matter of Bill C-92, An Act respecting First Nations, Inuit and Métis children, youth and families), tabled in the Senate on May 13, 2019.

No. 36.

June 4, 2019—Consideration of the twentieth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources (Subject matter of Bill C-97, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 19, 2019 and other measures), tabled in the Senate on June 4, 2019.

No. 37.

June 4, 2019—Consideration of the thirty-first report of the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs (Subject matter of Bill C-97, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 19, 2019 and other measures), tabled in the Senate on June 4, 2019.

No. 38.

June 6, 2019—Consideration of the thirty-first report of the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce (Subject matter of Bill C-97, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 19, 2019 and other measures), tabled in the Senate on June 6, 2019.

No. 39.

June 6, 2019—Consideration of the nineteenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples (Subject matter of Bill C-97, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 19, 2019 and other measures), tabled in the Senate on June 6, 2019.

No. 40.

June 6, 2019—Consideration of the twenty-fifth report of the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence (Subject matter of Bill C-97, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 19, 2019 and other measures), tabled in the Senate on June 6, 2019.

No. 41.

June 6, 2019—Consideration of the eighteenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Transport and Communications (Subject matter of Bill C-97, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 19, 2019 and other measures), tabled in the Senate on June 6, 2019.

No. 42.

June 6, 2019—Consideration of the seventeenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry (Subject matter of Bill C-97, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 19, 2019 and other measures), tabled in the Senate on June 6, 2019.

No. 43.

June 12, 2019—Resuming debate on the consideration of the thirty-sixth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology (Subject matter of Bill C-97, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 19, 2019 and other measures), tabled in the Senate on June 6, 2019.

No. 45.

June 19, 2019—Consideration of the forty-second report of the Standing Senate Committee on National Finance (Subject matter of Bill C-101, An Act to amend the Customs Tariff and the Canadian International Trade Tribunal Act), tabled in the Senate on June 19, 2019.


Motions

No. 1.

December 8, 2015—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Jaffer, seconded by the Honourable Senator Cordy:

That the following Address be presented to His Excellency the Governor General of Canada:

To His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Chancellor and Principal Companion of the Order of Canada, Chancellor and Commander of the Order of Military Merit, Chancellor and Commander of the Order of Merit of the Police Forces, Governor General and Commander-in-Chief of Canada.

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY:

We, Her Majesty’s most loyal and dutiful subjects, the Senate of Canada in Parliament assembled, beg leave to offer our humble thanks to Your Excellency for the gracious Speech which Your Excellency has addressed to both Houses of Parliament.

No. 246.

By the Honourable Senator Bellemare:

February 20, 2019—That, for the remainder of the current session, without affecting any authority separately granted to a committee to meet while the Senate is sitting, committees scheduled to meet be authorized to do so for the purpose of considering Government Business, even if the Senate is then sitting, with the application of rule 12-18(1) being suspended in relation thereto.


Inquiries

No. 4.

By the Honourable Senator Harder, P.C.:

March 21, 2019—That he will call the attention of the Senate to the budget entitled Investing in the Middle Class, tabled in the House of Commons on March 19, 2019, by the Minister of Finance, the Honourable Bill Morneau, P.C., M.P., and in the Senate on March 20, 2019.


Other

Nil


Other Business

Rule 4-15(2) states:

Except as otherwise ordered by the Senate, any item of Other Business on the Order Paper and any motion or inquiry on the Notice Paper that have not been proceeded with during 15 sitting days shall be dropped from the Order Paper and Notice Paper.

Consequently, the number appearing in parentheses indicates the number of sittings since the item was last proceeded with.

Bills – Messages from the House of Commons

No. 1.

October 18, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Seidman, seconded by the Honourable Senator Boisvenu:

That the Senate agree to the amendments made by the House of Commons to Bill S-228, An Act to amend the Food and Drugs Act (prohibiting food and beverage marketing directed at children); and

That a message be sent to the House of Commons to acquaint that house accordingly.

And on the motion of the Honourable Senator Wallin, seconded by the Honourable Senator Bovey:

That the motion, together with the message from the House of Commons on the same subject dated September 19, 2018, be referred to the Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry for consideration and report.

No. 2. (five)

May 14, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Ataullahjan, seconded by the Honourable Senator Plett:

That the Senate agree to the amendments made by the House of Commons to Bill S-240, An Act to amend the Criminal Code and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (trafficking in human organs); and

That a message be sent to the House of Commons to acquaint that house accordingly.—(Honourable Senator Mégie)


Senate Public Bills – Third Reading

No. 1. (twelve)

March 28, 2017—Third reading of Bill S-213, An Act to amend the Constitution Act, 1867 and the Parliament of Canada Act (Speakership of the Senate).—(Honourable Senator Mercer)


No. 2. (three)

May 8, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Ringuette, seconded by the Honourable Senator Moncion, for the third reading of Bill S-237, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (criminal interest rate), as amended.

And on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Cools, seconded by the Honourable Senator Bovey:

That Bill S-237, as amended, be not now read a third time, but that it be further amended in clause 1, on page 1, by replacing line 15 (as replaced by decision of the Senate on April 19, 2018) with the following:

“plus thirty-five per cent on the credit advanced under an”.—(Honourable Senator Omidvar)


Commons Public Bills – Third Reading

No. 1. (ten)

February 21, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Mégie, seconded by the Honourable Senator Dasko, for the third reading of Bill C-243, An Act respecting the development of a national maternity assistance program strategy.—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 2.

June 11, 2019—Third reading of Bill C-262, An Act to ensure that the laws of Canada are in harmony with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.—(Honourable Senator Sinclair)


Private Bills – Third Reading

No. 1. (one)

December 11, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Mercer, seconded by the Honourable Senator Cordy, for the third reading of Bill S-1002, An Act respecting Girl Guides of Canada.

And on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Dalphond, seconded by the Honourable Senator Dupuis:

That Bill S-1002 be not now read a third time, but that it be amended on page 8 by adding the following after line 17:

16.1 (1) Directors of the Corporation are jointly and severally, or solidarily, liable to employees of the Corporation for all debts not exceeding six months’ wages payable to each employee for services performed for the Corporation while they are directors.

(2) A director is not liable under subsection (1) unless

(a) the Corporation has been sued for the debt within six months after it has become due and execution has been returned unsatisfied in whole or in part;

(b) the Corporation has commenced liquidation and dissolution proceedings or has been dissolved and a claim for the debt has been proved within six months after the earlier of the date of commencement of the liquidation and dissolution proceedings and the date of dissolution; or

(c) the Corporation has made an assignment or a receiving order has been made against it under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act and a claim for the debt has been proved within six months after the date of the assignment or receiving order.

(3) A director, unless sued for a debt referred to in subsection (1) while a director or within two years after ceasing to be a director, is not liable under this section.

(4) If execution referred to in paragraph (2)(a) has issued, the amount recoverable from a director is the amount remaining unsatisfied after execution.

(5) A director who pays a debt referred to in subsection (1) that is proved in liquidation and dissolution or bankruptcy proceedings is subrogated to any priority that the employee would have been entitled to and, if a judgment has been obtained, the director is

(a) in Quebec, subrogated to the employee’s rights as declared in the judgment; and

(b) elsewhere in Canada, entitled to an assignment of the judgment.

(6) A director who has satisfied a claim under this section is entitled to recover from the other directors who were liable for the claim their respective shares.”.—(Honourable Senator Mercer)


Senate Public Bills – Reports of Committees

No. 1. (six)

May 9, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Petitclerc, seconded by the Honourable Senator Day, for the adoption of the thirty-third report of the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology (Bill S-252, Voluntary Blood Donations Act (An Act to amend the Blood Regulations), with a recommendation), presented in the Senate on April 9, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Wallin)


Commons Public Bills – Reports of Committees

No. 1.

May 30, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Griffin, seconded by the Honourable Senator Mégie, for the adoption of the sixteenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry (Bill C-281, An Act to establish a National Local Food Day, with amendments), presented in the Senate on May 29, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Black (Ontario))

No. 2.

June 5, 2019—Consideration of the thirty-third report of the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs (Bill C-337, An Act to amend the Judges Act and the Criminal Code (sexual assault), with amendments and observations), presented in the Senate on June 5, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C.)


Private Bills – Reports of Committees

Nil


Senate Public Bills – Second Reading

No. 1. (fourteen)

March 24, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Patterson, seconded by the Honourable Senator Enverga, for the second reading of Bill S-221, An Act to amend the Constitution Act, 1867 (Property qualifications of Senators).—(Honourable Senator Plett)

No. 2. (five)

May 29, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Wetston, seconded by the Honourable Senator Marwah, for the second reading of Bill S-250, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (interception of private communications).—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 3. (eight)

September 25, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Eggleton, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Richards, for the second reading of Bill S-253, An Act to amend the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act and other Acts and Regulations (pension plans).—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 4. (fourteen)

October 23, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, seconded by the Honourable Senator Petitclerc, for the second reading of Bill S-254, An Act to establish Promotion of Essential Skills Learning Week.—(Honourable Senator Mégie)

No. 5. (one)

October 23, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Bernard, seconded by the Honourable Senator Forest, for the second reading of Bill S-255, An Act proclaiming Emancipation Day.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 6. (fourteen)

November 27, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, seconded by the Honourable Senator Harder, P.C., for the second reading of Bill S-256, An Act respecting the development of a national framework for essential workforce skills.—(Honourable Senator Mégie)

No. 7. (ten)

April 10, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Ngo, seconded by the Honourable Senator Stewart Olsen, for the second reading of Bill S-257, An Act to amend the Investment Canada Act (mandatory national security review of investments by foreign state-owned enterprises).—(Honourable Senator Omidvar)

No. 8. (fourteen)

March 19, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Pate, seconded by the Honourable Senator Mégie, for the second reading of Bill S-258, An Act to amend the Criminal Records Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts.—(Honourable Senator Cormier)

No. 9.

April 9, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Omidvar, seconded by the Honourable Senator Gold, for the second reading of Bill S-259, An Act respecting the repurposing of certain seized, frozen or sequestrated assets.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 10. (seven)

May 7, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Day, for the second reading of Bill S-260, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (Conversion Therapy).—(Honourable Senator Cormier)

No. 11. (six)

May 9, 2019—Second reading of Bill S-261, An Act to provide a framework for the lifting of sanctions against Iran through the establishment of benchmarks relating to Iranian behaviour in respect of terrorism, human rights violations and incitement to hatred and to establish measures to hold Iran to account for the continuation of any misconduct.—(Honourable Senator Tkachuk)


Commons Public Bills – Second Reading

No. 1. (eight)

April 30, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Mercer, seconded by the Honourable Senator Day, for the second reading of Bill C-316, An Act to amend the Canada Revenue Agency Act (organ donors).—(Honourable Senator Ringuette)

No. 2. (eleven)

February 19, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Galvez, seconded by the Honourable Senator Klyne, for the second reading of Bill C-326, An Act to amend the Department of Health Act (drinking water guidelines).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 3. (seven)

November 1, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Omidvar, seconded by the Honourable Senator Gold, for the second reading of Bill C-344, An Act to amend the Department of Public Works and Government Services Act (community benefit).—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 4. (seven)

October 18, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Griffin, seconded by the Honourable Senator Mégie, for the second reading of Bill C-354, An Act to amend the Department of Public Works and Government Services Act (use of wood).—(Honourable Senator Mercer)

No. 5. (twelve)

April 2, 2019—Second reading of Bill C-369, An Act to amend the Bills of Exchange Act, the Interpretation Act and the Canada Labour Code (National Day for Truth and Reconciliation).—(Honourable Senator Harder, P.C.)

No. 6. (twelve)

September 20, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Sinclair, seconded by the Honourable Senator Pratte, for the second reading of Bill C-374, An Act to amend the Historic Sites and Monuments Act (composition of the Board).—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 7. (nine)

April 30, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Lankin, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Bellemare, for the second reading of Bill C-375, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (presentence report).—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 8.

May 30, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Christmas, seconded by the Honourable Senator Deacon (Ontario), for the second reading of Bill C-391, An Act respecting a national strategy for the repatriation of Indigenous human remains and cultural property.—(Honourable Senator Christmas)

No. 9. (twelve)

November 22, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Harder, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Verner, P.C., for the second reading of Bill C-402, An Act to change the name of certain electoral districts.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 10. (nine)

April 30, 2019—Second reading of Bill C-417, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (disclosure of information by jurors).—(Honourable Senator Harder, P.C.)


Private Bills – Second Reading

Nil


Reports of Committees – Other

No. 1. (three)

November 15, 2016—Resuming debate on the consideration of the first report (interim) of the Special Senate Committee on Senate Modernization, entitled Senate Modernization: Moving Forward, deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on October 4, 2016.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 5. (twelve)

November 2, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Tannas, seconded by the Honourable Senator Wells, for the adoption of the sixth report (interim) of the Special Senate Committee on Senate Modernization, entitled Senate Modernization: Moving Forward (Speakership), presented in the Senate on October 5, 2016.—(Honourable Senator Greene)

No. 6. (three)

November 22, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Massicotte, seconded by the Honourable Senator Moore for the adoption of the seventh report (interim), as amended, of the Special Senate Committee on Senate Modernization, entitled Senate Modernization: Moving Forward (Regional interest), presented in the Senate on October 18, 2016.—(Honourable Senator Smith)

No. 7. (eight)

February 28, 2017—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Frum, seconded by the Honourable Senator Beyak for the adoption of the ninth report (interim) of the Special Senate Committee on Senate Modernization, entitled Senate Modernization: Moving Forward (Question Period), presented in the Senate on October 25, 2016.—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 50. (eight)

November 1, 2017—Resuming debate on the consideration of the tenth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources, entitled Decarbonizing Transportation in Canada, tabled in the Senate on June 22, 2017.—(Honourable Senator Neufeld)

No. 100. (one)

October 25, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Black (Alberta), seconded by the Honourable Senator Bovey:

That the twenty-fourth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce, tabled on Tuesday, October 16, 2018, be adopted and that, pursuant to rule 12-24(1), the Senate request a complete and detailed response from the government, with the Minister of Finance being identified as minister responsible for responding to the report.—(Honourable Senator Ringuette)

No. 101.

February 19, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Black (Alberta), seconded by the Honourable Senator Pratte, for the adoption of the twenty-fifth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce, entitled Cyber assault: It should keep you up at night, deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on October 29, 2018.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 102. (two)

December 5, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin for the adoption of the tenth report of the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament, entitled Develop and propose amendments to the Rules of the Senate to establish the Standing Committee on Audit and Oversight, presented in the Senate on November 29, 2018.—(Honourable Senator Gold)

No. 104.

February 19, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Black (Alberta), seconded by the Honourable Senator Bovey, for the adoption of the twenty-ninth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce, entitled The collection of financial information by Statistics Canada, tabled in the Senate on December 11, 2018.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 105. (nine)

April 10, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Greene, seconded by the Honourable Senator Campbell:

That the thirteenth report of the Special Senate Committee on Senate Modernization entitled Reflecting the New Reality of the Senate, presented in the Senate on December 11, 2018, be adopted and that, pursuant to rule 12-24(1), the Senate request a complete and detailed response from the government, with the Minister of Democratic Institutions being identified as the minister responsible for responding to the report.

No. 107. (fourteen)

February 20, 2019—Consideration of the sixteenth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights, entitled Study on the Human Rights of Federally-Sentenced Persons: The Most Basic Human Right is to be Treated as a Human Being, tabled in the Senate on February 20, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Bernard)

No. 110. (thirteen)

February 28, 2019—Consideration of the thirtieth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce, entitled Ten Years After the Financial Crisis: An Update on Systemic Risks, tabled in the Senate on February 28, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Black (Alberta))

No. 114. (six)

April 30, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Marwah, seconded by the Honourable Senator Day for the adoption of the thirty-eighth report of the Standing Committee on Internal Economy, Budgets and Administration, entitled Process for recommendation – Clerk of the Senate and Clerk of the Parliaments, presented in the Senate on March 21, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Saint-Germain)

No. 117. (six)

May 7, 2019—Consideration of the twenty-fourth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade, entitled Venezuela: An Uncertain Transition, tabled in the Senate on May 7, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Andreychuk)

No. 119. (two)

May 16, 2019—Consideration of the twenty-third report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence, entitled Sexual Harassment and Violence in the Canadian Armed Forces, tabled in the Senate on May 16, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Boniface)

No. 122.

June 11, 2019—Consideration of the fourth report of the Special Committee on the Arctic, entitled Northern Lights: A Wake-Up Call for the Future of Canada, tabled in the Senate on June 11, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Patterson)

No. 123.

June 11, 2019—Consideration of the twenty-sixth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade, entitled Cultural Diplomacy at the Front Stage of Canada's Foreign Policy, deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on June 11, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Andreychuk)

No. 124.

June 12, 2019—Consideration of the twenty-sixth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence, entitled Canadian Veterans' Use of Cannabis for Medical Purposes, tabled in the Senate on June 12, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Boniface)

No. 125.

June 13, 2019—Consideration of the thirteenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Official Languages, entitled Modernizing the Official Languages Act: Views of the Federal Institutions and Recommendations, deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on June 13, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Cormier)

No. 126.

June 19, 2019—Consideration of the thirty-second report of the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce, entitled Open Banking: What it Means for You, tabled in the Senate on June 19, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Black (Alberta))

No. 127.

June 20, 2019—Consideration of the forty-third report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on National Finance, entitled First Interim Report on Defence Procurement - Summary of Evidence, presented in the Senate on June 20, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Mockler)

No. 128.

June 20, 2019—Consideration of the eleventh report (interim) of the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament, entitled Parliamentary Privilege: Then and Now, tabled in the Senate on June 20, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 130.

June 20, 2019—Consideration of the twenty-seventh report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade, entitled Safety and Security for Global Affairs Canada Employees and Canadians Abroad, tabled in the Senate on June 20, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Andreychuk)

For Monday, June 24, 2019

No. 129.

June 20, 2019—Consideration of the first report of the Special Senate Committee on the Charitable Sector, entitled Catalyst for Change: A Roadmap to a Stronger Charitable Sector, tabled in the Senate on June 20, 2019.—(Honourable Senator Mercer)


Motions

No. 73. (nine)

March 24, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Patterson, seconded by the Honourable Senator Runciman:

Whereas the Senate provides representation for groups that are often underrepresented in Parliament, such as Aboriginal peoples, visible minorities and women;

Whereas paragraph (3) of section 23 of the Constitution Act, 1867 requires that, in order to be qualified for appointment to and to maintain a place in the Senate, a person must own land with a net worth of at least four thousand dollars in the province for which he or she is appointed;

Whereas a person’s personal circumstances or the availability of real property in a particular location may prevent him or her from owning the required property;

Whereas appointment to the Senate should not be restricted to those who own real property of a minimum net worth;

Whereas the existing real property qualification is inconsistent with the democratic values of modern Canadian society and is no longer an appropriate or relevant measure of the fitness of a person to serve in the Senate;

Whereas, in the case of Quebec, each of the twenty-four Senators representing the province must be appointed for and must have either their real property qualification in or be resident of a specified Electoral Division;

Whereas an amendment to the Constitution of Canada in relation to any provision that applies to one or more, but not all, provinces may be made by proclamation issued by the Governor General under the Great Seal of Canada only where so authorized by resolutions of the Senate and House of Commons and of the legislative assembly of each province to which the amendment applies;

Whereas the Supreme Court of Canada has determined that a full repeal of paragraph (3) of section 23 of the Constitution Act, 1867, respecting the real property qualification of Senators, would require a resolution of the Quebec National Assembly pursuant to section 43 of the Constitution Act, 1982;

Now, therefore, the Senate resolves that an amendment to the Constitution of Canada be authorized to be made by proclamation issued by His Excellency the Governor General under the Great Seal of Canada in accordance with the Schedule hereto.

SCHEDULE

AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF CANADA

1.(1) Paragraph (3) of section 23 of the Constitution Act, 1867 is repealed.

(2) Section 23 of the Act is amended by replacing the semi-colon at the end of paragraph (5) with a period and by repealing paragraph (6).

2.The Declaration of Qualification set out in The Fifth Schedule to the Act is replaced by the following:

I, A.B., do declare and testify that I am by law duly qualified to be appointed a member of the Senate of Canada.

3. This Amendment may be cited as the Constitution Amendment, [year of proclamation] (Real property qualification of Senators).—(Honourable Senator Gold)

No. 89. (eleven)

May 12, 2016—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, seconded by the Honourable Senator Harder, P.C.:

That, in order to ensure that legislative reports of Senate committees follow a transparent, comprehensible and non-partisan methodology, the Rules of the Senate be amended by replacing rule 12-23(1) by the following:

“Obligation to report bill

12-23. (1) The committee to which a bill has been referred shall report the bill to the Senate. The report shall set out any amendments that the committee is recommending.  In addition, the report shall have appended to it the committee’s observations on:

(a) whether the bill generally conforms with the Constitution of Canada, including:

(i) the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and

(ii) the division of legislative powers between Parliament and the provincial and territorial legislatures;

(b) whether the bill conforms with treaties and international agreements that Canada has signed or ratified;

(c) whether the bill unduly impinges on any minority or economically disadvantaged groups;

(d) whether the bill has any impact on one or more provinces or territories;

(e) whether the appropriate consultations have been conducted;

(f) whether the bill contains any obvious drafting errors;

(g) all amendments moved but not adopted in the committee, including the text of these amendments; and

(h) any other matter that, in the committee’s opinion, should be brought to the attention of the Senate.”

And on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Nancy Ruth, seconded by the Honourable Senator Tkachuk:

That the motion be not now adopted, but that it be amended by:

1.adding the following new subsection after proposed subsection (c):

“(d) whether the bill has received substantive gender-based analysis;”; and

2.by changing the designation for current proposed subsections (d) to (h) to (e) to (i).

And on the motion of the Honourable Senator Omidvar, seconded by the Honourable Senator Mercer:

That the motion and the amendment now under debate be referred to the Special Senate Committee on Senate Modernization for consideration and report.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 215. (eleven)

June 20, 2017—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Dawson, seconded by the Honourable Senator Munson:

That the Senate take note of Agenda 2030 and the related sustainable development goals adopted by the United Nations on September 25, 2015, and encourage the Government of Canada to take account of them as it drafts legislation and develops policy relating to sustainable development.

And on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, seconded by the Honourable Senator Petitclerc:

That the motion be not now adopted, but that it be amended by:

1.adding the words “Parliament and” after the word “encourage”; and

2.replacing, in the English version, the words “it drafts legislation and develops” by the words “they draft legislation and develop”.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 302. (thirteen)

February 15, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Pate, seconded by the Honourable Senator Marwah:

That the Senate administration be instructed to remove the website of the Honourable Senator Beyak from any Senate server and cease to support any website for the senator until the process undertaken by the Senate Ethics Officer following a request to conduct an inquiry under the Ethics and Conflict of Interest Code for Senators in relation to the content of Senator Beyak’s website and her obligations under the Code is finally disposed of, either by the tabling of the Senate Ethics Officer’s preliminary determination letter or inquiry report, by a report of the Standing Committee on Ethics and Conflict of Interest for Senators, or by a decision of the Senate respecting the matter.

And on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Pratte, seconded by the Honourable Senator Coyle:

That the motion be not now adopted, but that it be amended:

1.by deleting the words “the Senate administration be instructed to remove the website of the Honourable Senator Beyak from any Senate server and cease to support any website for the senator”; and

2.by adding the following after the word “matter”:

“, the Senate administration be instructed:

(a)to remove the 103 letters of support dated March 8, 2017, to October 4, 2017, from the website of Senator Beyak (lynnbeyak.sencanada.ca) and any other website housed by a Senate server; and

(b)not to provide support, including technical support and the reimbursement of expenses, for any website of the senator that contains or links to any of the said letters of support”.—(Honourable Senator McPhedran)

No. 310. (eight)

April 25, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Doyle, seconded by the Honourable Senator Tannas:

That the Senate encourage the Government of Canada to work with the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, the only province whose major population centres are not physically linked to the mainland of Canada, to evaluate the possibility of building a tunnel connecting the Island of Newfoundland to Labrador and the Quebec North Shore, in an effort to facilitate greater economic development in Canada’s Northeast, and to further strengthen national unity, including the possibility of using funding from the infrastructure program for this work; and

That a message be sent to the House of Commons to acquaint that house with the above.—(Honourable Senator Omidvar)

No. 325. (eleven)

April 26, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McCallum, seconded by the Honourable Senator Coyle:

That the Senate call on the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops to:

(a)invite Pope Francis to Canada to apologize on behalf of the Catholic Church to Indigenous people for the church’s role in the residential school system, as outlined in Call to Action 58 of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report;

(b)to respect its moral obligation and the spirit of the 2006 Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement and resume the best efforts to raise the full amount of the agreed upon funds; and

(c)to make a consistent and sustained effort to turn over the relevant documents when called upon by survivors of residential schools, their families, and scholars working to understand the full scope of the horrors of the residential school system in the interest of truth and reconciliation.—(Honourable Senator Pate)

No. 357. (five)

June 14, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Smith:

That, in light of the Government of Canada’s recent significant shift in its foreign policy relating to Iran, which does not reflect the Senate’s recent decision to reject the principles of Bill S-219, An Act to deter Iran-sponsored terrorism, incitement to hatred, and human rights violations, including an annual report of Iranian human rights violations, the Senate now:

(a)strongly condemn the current regime in Iran for its ongoing sponsorship of terrorism around the world, including instigating violent attacks on the Gaza border;

(b)condemn the recent statements made by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei calling for genocide against the Jewish people;

(c)call on the government to:

(i)abandon its current plan and immediately cease any and all negotiations or discussions with the Islamic Republic of Iran to restore diplomatic relations;

(ii)demand that the Iranian Regime immediately release all Canadians and Canadian permanent residents who are currently detained in Iran, including Maryam Mombeini, the widow of Professor Kavous Sayed-Emami, and Saeed Malekpour, who has been imprisoned since 2008; and

(iii)immediately designate the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps as a listed terrorist entity under the Criminal Code of Canada; and

(d)stand with the people of Iran and recognize that they, like all people, have a fundamental right to freedom of conscience and religion, freedom of thought, belief, opinion, and expression, including freedom of the press and other forms of communication, freedom of peaceful assembly, and freedom of association.—(Honourable Senator Tkachuk)

No. 358. (six)

June 14, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Eggleton, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Mercer:

That the Senate urge the government to initiate consultations with the provinces, territories, Indigenous people, and other interested groups to develop an adequately funded national cost-shared universal nutrition program with the goal of ensuring healthy children and youth who, to that end, are educated in issues relating to nutrition and provided with a nutritious meal daily in a program with appropriate safeguards to ensure the independent oversight of food procurement, nutrition standards, and governance.—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 371. (six)

September 20, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Brazeau, seconded by the Honourable Senator Deacon (Ontario):

That the Senate urge the Government of Canada and the RCMP to address the issue of fraudulent “native” individuals and organizations selling fraudulent membership or status cards, a practice that is detrimental to the Indigenous peoples of Canada.—(Honourable Senator McCallum)

No. 410.

November 22, 2018—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Miville-Dechêne, seconded by the Honourable Senator Klyne:

That the Senate, in light of the decisions made by the Government of Ontario with respect to the Office of the French Language Services Commissioner and the Université de l’Ontario français:

1.reaffirm the importance of both official languages as the foundation of our federation;

2.remind the Government of Canada of its responsibility to defend and promote language rights, as expressed in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Official Languages Act; and

3.urge the Government of Canada to take all necessary measures, within its jurisdiction, to ensure the vitality and development of official language minority communities.—(Honourable Senator Omidvar)

No. 439. (eleven)

March 18, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Christmas, seconded by the Honourable Senator Griffin:

That the Senate call on the government to raise awareness of the magnitude of modern day slavery in Canada and abroad and to take steps to combat human trafficking, and

That the Senate also urge the government to designate the 22nd day of February each year as National Human Trafficking Awareness Day, to coincide with the anniversary of the unanimous declaration of the House of Commons on February 22, 2007, to condemn all forms of human trafficking and slavery.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 468. (four)

May 14, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Ngo, seconded by the Honourable Senator Ataullahjan:

That the Senate urge the Government of Canada to actively support the genuine autonomy of Tibet and, consequently, to also call for the People’s Republic of China to:

(a)renew the Sino-Tibetan dialogue in good faith and based on the Middle Way Approach;

(b)respect the linguistics rights, freedom of movement, thought, conscience and religion of the people in Tibet;

(c)free all Tibetan political prisoners, and cease all arbitrary detention of dissidents; and

(d)grant Canada reciprocal diplomatic access to Tibet without limitations;

That the Senate also urge the Government of Canada to acknowledge the Dalai Lama’s appointment of Gedhun Choekyi Nyima as the official eleventh Panchen Lama; and

That a message be sent to the House of Commons to acquaint it with the foregoing.—(Honourable Senator Day)

No. 470. (five)

April 2, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Plett, seconded by the Honourable Senator Wells:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs be authorized to examine and report on the serious and disturbing allegations that persons in the Office of the Prime Minister attempted to exert pressure on the former Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, the Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, P.C., M.P., and to interfere with her independence, thereby potentially undermining the integrity of the administration of justice;

That, as part of this study, and without limiting the committee’s right to invite other witnesses as it may decide, the committee invite the Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, P.C., M.P.;

That the committee submit its final report no later than June 15, 2019; and

That the committee retain all powers necessary to publicize its findings until 180 days after tabling the final report.

And on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Ringuette, seconded by the Honourable Senator Woo:

That the motion be not now adopted, but that it be amended:

1.by replacing the words “report on the serious” by the words “report on the role of political staff in the Office of the Prime Minister in their interactions with parliamentarians, ministers and Attorneys general, including the serious”; and

2.by adding the following new paragraph after the words “Jody Wilson-Raybould, P.C., M.P.;”:

“That, as part of this study, and without limiting the committee’s right to invite other witnesses as it may decide, the committee invite the following witnesses with potential experience in past matters of alleged political interference, direction and pressure on parliamentarians and their work in the Office of the Prime Minister:

Nigel Wright, former Chief of Staff to the Prime Minister;

Benjamin Perrin, former Special Adviser and Legal Counsel to the Prime Minister;

Ray Novak, former Chief of Staff to the Prime Minister;

The Honorable Senator David Tkachuk;

The Honourable Marjory LeBreton, P.C., former senator;

The Honourable Irving Russell Gerstein, former senator; and

The Right Honourable Stephen Harper, P.C., former Prime Minister of Canada;”.—(Honourable Senator Wells)

No. 474.

April 4, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Pratte, seconded by the Honourable Senator Marwah:

That a Special Committee on Prosecutorial Independence be appointed to examine and report on the independence of the Public Prosecution Service of Canada and of the Attorney General of Canada;

That the committee be composed of six senators from the Independent Senators Group, three Conservative senators and one Independent Liberal senator, to be nominated by the Committee of Selection, and that four members constitute a quorum;

That the committee examine and report on the separation of the functions of the Minister of Justice and those of the Attorney General of Canada, and on other initiatives that promote the integrity of the administration of justice;

That the committee also examine and report on remediation agreements as provided by PART XXII.1 of the Criminal Code, in particular, the appropriate interpretation of the national economic interest mentioned in subsection 715.32(3) of the Criminal Code;

That the committee have the power to send for persons, papers and records; to examine witnesses; and to publish such papers and evidence from day to day as may be ordered by the committee;

That, notwithstanding rule 12-18(1), the committee be authorized to meet even though the Senate may then be sitting;

That, notwithstanding rule 12-18(2)(b)(i), the committee have the power to meet from Monday to Friday, even though the Senate may then be adjourned for a period exceeding one week; and

That the committee be empowered to report from time to time and submit its final report no later than June 1, 2019, and retain all powers necessary to publicize its findings until 30 days after the tabling of the final report.

And on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Plett, seconded by the Honourable Senator Wells:

That the motion be not now adopted, but that it be amended by:

1.Replacing the words “a Special Committee on Prosecutorial Independence be appointed” with the words “the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs be authorized”;

2.Deleting the paragraph beginning with the words “That the committee be composed of six senators”;

3.Deleting the paragraph beginning with the words “That the committee have the power to send for persons”; and

4.Deleting the words “be empowered to report from time to time and”.—(Honourable Senator Ringuette)

No. 476. (four)

April 11, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion, as amended, of the Honourable Senator McPhedran, seconded by the Honourable Senator Bellemare:

That the Senate urge the Government of Canada without further delay to invoke the Genocide Convention and specifically to engage with like-minded States to pursue the matter before the International Court of Justice in order to hold Myanmar to its obligations and to seek provisional measures and ultimately reparations for the Rohingya people;

That the Senate urge Canada to exert pressure on Myanmar to allow for unobstructed access to Rakhine State by independent monitors in order to investigate the international crimes committed and to afford protection to remaining Rohingya;

That the Senate urge the Government of Canada to continue to assist the Government of Bangladesh through multilateral aid in addressing the humanitarian needs of the Rohingya refugees, with particular focus on the needs of women and children, including education; and

That a message be sent to the House of Commons requesting that house to unite with the Senate for the above purpose.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 478. (four)

May 14, 2019—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Frum, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin:

That, in light of Global Affairs Canada’s provision of international aid to groups that do not align with Canadian values and stated Canadian policy, the Senate now:

(a)recall Prime Minister Trudeau’s numerous condemnations of boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) campaigns against Israel, including his reference to them as a “new form of anti-Semitism”;

(b)recall the 2016 motion in the House of Commons, supported by the Liberal and Conservative parties alike, to “condemn any and all attempts by Canadian organizations, groups or individuals to promote the BDS movement, both here at home and abroad”;

(c)recall that Global Affairs Canada has recognized the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance’s (IHRA) definition of antisemitism, which identifies “double standards”, denials of the Jewish right to self-determination, and therefore BDS campaigns as anti-Semitic;

(d)recall that Canada’s Official Development Assistance Accountability Act is meant to ensure that “all Canadian official development assistance is focused on poverty reduction and is consistent with aid effectiveness principles and Canadian values”;

(e)recall that Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy assures that “our assistance is more responsive, more transparent and more predictable”;

(f)recall that Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy prioritizes “peace and security, by promoting inclusive peace processes and combatting gender-based violence”;

(g)recall that Global Affairs Canada assures that “For all humanitarian and development assistance funding for Palestinians, Canada exercises enhanced due diligence”; and

(h)call on the government to:

(i)scrutinize all grants provided by Global Affairs Canada to non-governmental organizations, ensuring Canadian aid is not provided to groups that promote hatred, racism, anti-Semitism, and/or BDS campaigns;

(ii)freeze $1 million in funding to the Palestinian organization “Wi’am: Peace and Conflict Transformation Center” — a group that promotes BDS campaigns and anti-Semitic documents;

(iii)review the entirety of the $4.8 million “Women of Courage — Women, Peace and Security” grant to the United Church of Canada (and its KAIROS Canada program), as such groups are partners of Wi’am and also promote BDS and anti-Semitic documents; and

(iv)ensure that support for women’s involvement in peace processes is inclusive, and not discriminatory, as support for civil society actors that promote BDS campaigns is antithetical to these objectives.—(Honourable Senator Omidvar)


Inquiries

No. 12. (eight)

May 18, 2016—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Seidman, calling the attention of the Senate to its role in the protection of regional and minority representation.—(Honourable Senator Mercer)

No. 26. (four)

May 30, 2017—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator McPhedran, calling the attention of the Senate to the important opportunity we have to review our principles and procedures with a view to ensuring that the Senate has the strongest most effective policies and mechanisms possible to respond to complaints against senators of sexual or other kinds of harassment.—(Honourable Senator Moodie)

No. 36. (thirteen)

February 27, 2018—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, calling the attention of the Senate to the challenges of literacy and essential skills for the 21st century in Canada, the provinces and the territories.—(Honourable Senator McCallum)

No. 39. (six)

May 1, 2018—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Bernard, calling the attention of the Senate to anti-black racism.—(Honourable Senator Mercer)

No. 40. (ten)

March 29, 2018—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Poirier, calling the attention of the Senate to the ongoing challenges faced by seasonal workers in New Brunswick.—(Honourable Senator Hartling)

No. 47. (eleven)

October 2, 2018—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Wetston, calling the attention of the Senate to beneficial ownership transparency.—(Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C.)

No. 52. (fourteen)

October 2, 2018—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator McCallum, calling the attention of the Senate to the importance of preserving the Independent Assessment Process (IAP) records of those Indian Residential School survivors who claimed compensation for historic physical and sexual abuse, pursuant to the 2006 Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA).—(Honourable Senator Sinclair)

No. 55. (thirteen)

December 5, 2018—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Manning, calling the attention of the Senate to Newfoundland and Labrador’s contribution to the Armed Forces with reference to the war in Afghanistan.—(Honourable Senator Manning)

No. 56.

October 4, 2018—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Richards, calling the attention of the Senate to the decimation of Atlantic salmon spawning grounds on the Miramichi, Restigouche and their tributaries.—(Honourable Senator Griffin)

No. 57. (five)

April 30, 2019—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, calling the attention of the Senate to the need to review the Bank of Canada Act and to extend its mandate.—(Honourable Senator Ringuette)

No. 58. (six)

April 11, 2019—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Downe, calling the attention of the Senate to:

(a)The regrettable failure of the Senate, on occasion, to perform its important duty of providing careful review of legislation. Many times over the years, senators have been urged and pressured by members of the government of the day to pass legislation as quickly as possible. However well intentioned, rushing legislation can have a long term negative impact;

(b)The example of the report last week by the Parliamentary Budget Officer “The cost differential between three regimes of Veterans Benefits”, which once again serves as a reminder of the rapid passage in 2005 of Bill C-45, the legislation enacting the New Veterans Charter which replaced the Pension Act;

(c)Bill C-45, which passed though both Houses of Parliament with a haste that did not reflect the serious impact of such legislation;

(d)The fact that having passed the House of Commons in two minutes, so quickly that second reading, committee study and third reading were deemed to have taken place over the space of those two minutes, Bill C-45 came here, where the four hours plus of chamber and committee debate was vastly more study than happened in the other place, but still in no way constituted the sober reflection and analysis that is our duty;

(e)The fact that the report of the Parliamentary Budget Officer last week demonstrated that the New Veterans Charter did not work as its proponents had promised, and as a result of senators’ failure to properly examine Bill C-45, disabled veterans and their families paid, and continue to pay the price. As the Parliamentary Budget Officer says in his report “From the perspective of the veteran, virtually all clients would be better off if they were to receive the benefits of the Pension Act.”, which the New Veterans Charter replaced;

(f)The fact that the Senate was in such a rush to pass the Bill that we referred it for a single meeting to the next committee that was scheduled to sit, not Defence or Veterans’ Affairs, but National Finance. And at that meeting, we were warned, but failed to heed the caution voiced by Sean Bruyea, retired Canadian Forces captain and longtime veterans’ advocate who testified “We all know that the government wants to be seen as honouring veterans, but that does not necessarily mean that their veteran’s charter is free of error… We believe disabled veterans and the CF would rather have it right than have a flawed and unjust charter right now”;

(g)The struggle we constantly face in this chamber, as every minister wants their bill passed, often with a real or imagined deadline looming, whether it be international obligations, public messaging, the summer break, or an election. Regarding the latter, it is worth recalling that the request to pass Bill C-45 quickly was so it would not die on the Order Paper prior to the 2006 Election;

(h)The lessons of the New Veterans Charter experience - that the Senate’s failure to do its job resulted in untold millions of dollars not being paid out to disabled veterans and their families. These were Canadian Forces members injured in the service of Canada;

(i)The opportunity we had to correct the legislation in 2005, and failed to do our job. Senators must reflect upon their obligation to provide sober second thought and to pass, amend, or reject legislation based solely on its merits; and

(j)Rather than simply standing and repeating platitudes in the days before Remembrance Day every year, let us work to remember them in our actions rather than empty words.—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 59.

May 14, 2019—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Downe, calling the attention of the Senate to:

(a)The importance of the federally-owned Confederation Bridge to the economy and way of life of Prince Edward Island, providing a vital link for commerce, tourism and the necessities of daily life for the people of that province;

(b)The heavy financial burden imposed by the toll on that Bridge, which amounted to $35.00 when it was first opened in May of 1997, but now stands at $47.75, an increase of 36 per cent, surely making the $3.70 per kilometer drive one of the most costly in Canada;

(c)The fact that while Prince Edward Islanders are grateful to have Confederation Bridge for the tremendous convenience and reduced transportation time for goods travelling to and from the Island, the reason Islanders initially agreed to a toll was the understanding that large scale federal transportation infrastructure programs required a “user pay” system in the form of tolls, and that was the only way they were going to get a bridge to replace the previous year-round ferry service;

(d)The change to that longstanding user pay policy when Justin Trudeau promised in the middle of the 2015 election campaign to cancel the toll on the replacement Champlain Bridge — like Confederation Bridge, also federally owned — being built in Montreal if he won;

(e)The Liberal victory in October of 2015 that resulted in the promised cancellation of the toll. However, keeping that impulsive election promise has pitted region against region and Canadians against Canadians. The feeling among many Prince Edward Islanders is that the federal government has favoured one part of the country by eliminating the toll on one bridge it owns and not on the other, and they wonder why Canadians are being treated differently depending on where they live;

(f)The repeated government justification for this unequal treatment — that the Champlain Bridge’s status as a “replacement” bridge warrants such inequality — rings hollow among those on the losing end of this disparity, both because the original Champlain Bridge charged a toll for 28 years, until it was paid for, and because the idea that the new Champlain Bridge is a “replacement bridge” is a distinction without a difference. Every bridge is a replacement for what came before, be that an older bridge, a ferry, or an alternate route. The decision to treat “new” and “replacement” bridges differently is every bit as much a political decision as the decision to cancel the toll on the Champlain Bridge;

(g)The Prime Minister’s statement, when asked in January 2017 about the unfairness of the toll on Confederation Bridge, that he would commit to, in his words “look at what can be done to make sure that people are able to travel freely and openly across this country at modest costs”, is a two year old commitment to Prince Edward Islanders that remains unfulfilled and is a promise unkept;

(h)Therefore, the Senate Chamber should examine and discuss the strain on the unity of Canada caused by this inconsistency in how our fellow citizens are treated, depending on where they reside in Canada and recommend to the government possible solutions to this problem.—(Honourable Senator Stewart Olsen)

No. 61.

May 14, 2019—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Moodie, calling the attention of the Senate to the issue of vaccine hesitancy and corresponding threats to public health in Canada.—(Honourable Senator Duncan)


Other

Nil


Notice Paper

Motions

No. 423. (fourteen)

By the Honourable Senator Frum:

December 5, 2018—That the Senate:

(a)strongly condemn the current regime in Iran for its ongoing human rights abuses and sponsorship of terrorism around the world, including its vocal and material support aimed at the destruction of the State of Israel;

(b)condemn the recent statements made by Iran’s President, Hassan Rouhani, calling Israel a “cancerous tumor” in the region;

(c)call on the government to:

(i)demand that the Iranian Regime immediately release all Canadians and Canadian permanent residents who are currently detained in Iran, including Maryam Mombeini, the widow of Professor Kavous Sayed-Emami, and Saeed Malekpour, who has been imprisoned since 2008;

(ii)immediately designate the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps in its entirety as a listed terrorist entity under the Criminal Code of Canada; and

(iii)to utilize the Justice for Victims of Corrupt Foreign Officials Act (Sergei Magnitsky Law) to sanction Iranian government regime entities and individuals involved in egregious human rights abuses; and

(d)stand with the people of Iran and recognize that they, like all people, have a fundamental right to freedom of conscience and religion, freedom of thought, belief, opinion, and expression, including freedom of the press and other forms of communication, freedom of peaceful assembly, and freedom of association.

No. 429. (thirteen)

By the Honourable Senator Wells:

December 11, 2018—That the Senate call upon Statistics Canada to refrain from accessing, under section 13 of the Statistics Act, documents or records of a financial nature maintained in any financial institution or credit reporting agency when such documents or records contain information that makes it possible to identify an individual without that individual’s consent.

No. 520.

By the Honourable Senator Bernard:

June 12, 2019—That, pursuant to rule 12-18(2)(b)(i), the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights be authorized to meet between July 29 and August 9, 2019, inclusive, even though the Senate may then be adjourned for a period exceeding one week; and

That the committee also be permitted, notwithstanding usual practices, to deposit with the Clerk of the Senate before September 3, 2019, the following reports if the Senate is not then sitting, with the reports being deemed to have been tabled in the Senate:

(a) final report relating to the human rights of federally-sentenced persons;

(b) interim report on issues relating to human rights and the machinery of government dealing with Canada’s international and national human rights obligations (forced and coerced sterilization of persons in Canada); and

(c) interim report on issues relating to human rights and the machinery of government dealing with Canada’s international and national human rights obligations (Passenger Protect Program).

No. 521.

By the Honourable Senator Dyck:

June 13, 2019—That the Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples have the power to meet on Wednesday, June 19, 2019, at 6:45 p.m., for the purpose of its study on the federal government’s constitutional, treaty, political and legal responsibilities to First Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples and on other matters generally relating to the Aboriginal peoples of Canada, even though the Senate may then be sitting, and that rule 12-18(1) be suspended in relation thereto.

No. 523.

By the Honourable Senator Sinclair:

June 14, 2019—That, notwithstanding any provision of the Rules, usual practice, or previous order:

1.if the Senate has not completed proceedings on Bill C-262 by 3 p.m. on June 19, 2019, the Speaker interrupt any proceedings then before the Senate to dispose of the bill without further debate, amendment or adjournment, provided that if the bill is on the Orders of the Day for third reading, but third reading has not yet been moved, a motion for third reading be deemed to have been moved and seconded;

2.if a vote is underway at the time provided for in point 1, the terms of that point take effect immediately after the vote and any consequential business;

3.if a standing vote on Bill C-262 had been deferred so that it would normally occur after the time provided in point 1, the vote be instead dealt with at the time provided for in point 1, as if it were deferred to that time, and then be governed by the other terms of this order;

4.if a standing vote on Bill C-262 is requested after the Speaker is required to interrupt proceedings under the terms of this order, the vote not be deferred and the bells to call in the senators ring only once and for 15 minutes, without the further ringing of the bells in relation to any subsequent standing votes requested during that sitting in relation to the bill;

5.if the Senate does not sit on June 19, 2019, the provisions of point 1 and other provisions of this order govern proceedings on Bill C-262 at the next sitting of the Senate as if that day were the day specified in this order;

6.on the day the Senate must dispose of Bill C-262 under this order, no motion to adjourn the Senate be received, and the provisions of the Rules and any previous order relating to the time of automatic adjournment and the suspension of the sitting at 6 p.m. be suspended until all questions necessary to dispose of the bill have been dealt with; and

7.for greater certainty, nothing in this order prevent proceedings on Bill C-262 from concluding before the date provided for in this order.

No. 524.

By the Honourable Senator Dalphond:

June 17, 2019—That, notwithstanding any provision of the Rules, usual practice, or previous order:

1.if the consideration of the report on Bill C-337, An Act to amend the Judges Act and the Criminal Code (sexual assault), or third reading of the bill is still on the Orders of the Day when the Senate adjourns on June 19, 2019, the Senate meet at 9 a.m. on June 20, 2019;

2.at the start of the sitting, immediately after prayers, the first item of business to be called be Bill C-337, with the following provisions then having effect, if required:

(a)if the report on the bill is on the Orders of the Day, but has not yet been moved for adoption, a motion for the adoption of the report be deemed to have been moved and seconded, with the provisions of sub-point (b) applying thereafter;

(b)if the report of the committee on the bill is still before the Senate, a motion for third reading be deemed to have been moved and seconded, once the report has been decided on; and

(c)if the bill is on the Orders of the Day for third reading, but third reading has not yet been moved, a motion for third reading be deemed to have been moved and seconded;

3.if a standing vote on Bill C-337 had been deferred so that it would normally occur after the time provided in point 1, the vote be instead dealt with at the time provided for in point 1, as if it were deferred to that time, and then be governed by the other terms of this order;

4.if a standing vote on any business relating to Bill C-337 is requested under the terms of this order, the vote not be deferred;

5.on the day the Senate must dispose of Bill C-337 under this order, no motion to adjourn debate or the Senate be received until all questions necessary to dispose of the bill have been dealt with;

6.if the proceedings on Bill C-337 are concluded before 1:30 p.m., the sitting be suspended to resume at 1:30 p.m.; and

7.for greater certainty, nothing in this order prevent proceedings at any stage of Bill C-337 from concluding before the date provided for in this order.

No. 526.

By the Honourable Senator Boniface:

June 19, 2019—That the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence be permitted, notwithstanding usual practices, to deposit with the Clerk of the Senate, between June 21 and August 1, 2019, a report relating to its study on Canada’s national security and defence policies, practices, circumstances and capabilities, if the Senate is not then sitting, and that the report be deemed to have been tabled in the Senate.


Inquiries

No. 60. (five)

By the Honourable Senator Martin:

April 10, 2019—That she will call the attention of the Senate to the career of the Honourable Senator Ghislain Maltais.

No. 62.

By the Honourable Senator Manning:

June 10, 2019—That he will call the attention of the Senate to the life of Gerald Campbell.

No. 63.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

June 18, 2019—That he will call the attention of the Senate to:

(a)The importance of the federal government as Canada’s largest single employer, with over 200,000 civilian employees;

(b)The fact that, although everyone understands that a significant portion of federal employees would be based in the nation’s capital, in recent years a trend has developed whereby the distribution of jobs between Ottawa and the regions has become more and more disproportionate in favour of the National Capital Region;

(c)Historically, approximately one-third of federal government jobs were based in the National Capital Region. However, in recent years — under successive governments — that number has grown to almost 46% in the Ottawa region last year;

(d)This is illustrated by the fact that in the period 2008-2018, the federal public service experienced a net gain of 11,470 jobs. Of that number, the vast majority were in the National Capital Region, at the expense of the regions of Canada;

(e)The impact of this concentration is twofold. Firstly, in many ways federal public servants are the “face” of government to Canadians. A more equal dispersal of these employees across Canada would serve to make the federal government more visible. Decentralization brings government closer to the people it serves;

(f)But the more tangible and obvious benefit to regions by employment decentralization is economic. Just as the public has a right to expect ready access to those who provide public services, the various provinces and regions of Canada value the well-paid stable workforce that the federal public service represents. Such a workforce, largely immune to the boom and bust cycle of other industries, can provide a foundation upon which a healthy regional economy can build, as indeed, has been the case with the National Capital Region;

(g)The example of Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) is proof of the beneficial impact of decentralization of government. VAC is the only department whose national headquarters is located outside the Ottawa region. The decision to move VAC to Charlottetown had a profound and lasting effect on PEI both economically and socially;

(h)The 1,230 VAC employees who currently work in Prince Edward Island, represents a steady payroll of some $90 million dollars, spent on cars, homes and the various goods and services associated with everyday life, a significant contribution to the Island economy;

(i)There is obviously more to a healthy economy than federal government jobs. Meaningful economic development can only come from a balanced economy that respects and welcomes the role of a robust private sector which invests the time and money necessary to create the jobs that will keep Canadians at home building their future. That having been said, a balanced economy also means there is an important role for Canada’s largest single employer, the federal government, to play;

(j)There is also the positive social benefit to having government jobs distributed across Canada. In the case of Prince Edward Island, this can be seen in the remarkable growth in the use of the French language. According to Statistics Canada, after Quebec and New Brunswick, Prince Edward Islanders are third, among the provinces in their knowledge of both languages. There is no doubt that the historical presence and strength of the Island Acadian community assisted in that regard, but, the greatest single contribution to the growth of the French language in Prince Edward Island over the last forty years is the presence of Veterans Affairs;

(k)Resistance to moving jobs across Canada is best illustrated by the absence of the deputy minister of Veterans Affairs Canada from working full time in the National Headquarters in Charlottetown. The fact that the current holder of that office is the only deputy minister who, unlike many former VAC deputy ministers, does not live and work in the same province as that department’s national headquarters causes a daily leadership vacuum in a department that has seen 23 ministers in 30 years; and

(l)Therefore, the Senate Chamber should examine and discuss the opportunities for decentralizing federal government jobs and services, and to urge the Government of Canada to restore the historical distribution of employment to one-third of jobs in the National Capital Region and two-thirds in the rest of the country, thereby contributing to the economic growth and stability of the regions of Canada.


Written Questions

No. 122.

By the Honourable Senator Boisvenu:

March 18, 2019—What will be the impact on National Defence of the carbon tax on fuel costs?

No. 124.

By the Honourable Senator Boisvenu:

March 18, 2019—For each province and territory, how many households saw the reinstatement of at-home mail delivery in each of the following years: 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018?

No. 126.

By the Honourable Senator Griffin:

April 3, 2019—Please provide information on the recycling of plastic agricultural waste in Canada. The following information is requested:

Any federal government initiatives to aid in the disposal of ag-bags, bale wrap, feed bags, totes and other plastic materials that can no longer be taken to the dump or sold for export to foreign countries like China;

Any federal government initiatives to aid in the creation of plastic recycling plants to convert plastic agricultural waste.

No. 129.

By the Honourable Senator Smith:

April 9, 2019—With respect to Invest in Canada:

1.Please outline the screening and disclosure process which took place prior to Mr. Ian McKay’s appointment in early 2018.

2.When did the Minister of International Trade become aware that the CEO of Invest in Canada, Mr. Ian McKay, was also serving as a director of Nesta Holdings Co. Ltd, a private equity firm investing within the marijuana industry?

3.Has the Minister sought an explanation from Mr. McKay as to why he resigned from the board of Auxly Cannabis Group Inc. in July 2018, but not from Nesta Holdings Co. Ltd? If so, what explanation was provided?

4.What action(s) will the Minister take with respect to the compliance order issued against Mr. McKay by the Conflict of lnterest and Ethics Commissioner on January 15, 2019? If no action(s) will be taken by the Minister, please provide the rationale.

No. 130.

By the Honourable Senator Smith:

April 9, 2019—With regards to an answer from Health Canada on the marijuana public education advertising campaign, tabled in the Senate on December 13, 2018:

1.How many ads were disapproved by Facebook (which includes Instagram) and Google (which includes YouTube)?

2.The answer states that there is “... ongoing collaboration as campaign components are deployed on these platforms”. What type of collaboration takes place? At what point have platforms become involved in the development of the content of the ads?

3.What changes were made to ads by the Government of Canada and/or Cossette Media in order to receive the approval of social media platforms?

4.The answer states: “...we have experienced temporary disapproval of advertisements…”. How long were these temporary disapprovals? What did the government do in the meantime to educate Canadians about the legalization of marijuana?

5.Did any social media platforms refuse Government of Canada advertising? If so, could they be identified, and could their rationale for refusing the ads be provided?

No. 131.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

April 10, 2019—With regard to the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement:

Under the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), Canadian and European exporters have quotas set for them, allowing a certain amount of a given product to be traded between one jurisdiction and the other.

For the period September 21, 2017 to March 31, 2019:

1.What percentage of each export quota did Canadian exporters fill in trade with the European Union?

2.What percentage of each export quota did European Union exporters fill in trade with Canada?

No. 132.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

April 10, 2019—With regard to Federal Public Service Employment:

For the period April 1, 2018 to March 31, 2019:

How many people worked for the Public Service of Canada (as defined by the Public Service Employment Act), by department, per geographical area for each of the months in the period specified?

No. 133.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

May 2, 2019—Regarding possible overseas tax evasion and the LGT Bank in Liechtenstein where information was disclosed in 2008, indicating 106 Canadian accounts, as of May 1, 2019:

1.How many Canadians (individuals, trusts, foundations and companies) have been determined to have had accounts in LGT Bank?

2.How much money has been identified as owing to the Government of Canada?

3.How many Canadians (individuals, trusts, foundations and companies) have been charged with overseas tax evasion?

4.What are the names of the individuals, companies, trusts and foundations charged?

5.In which court, and in which cities were these charges laid?

6.How many were convicted?

7.Of those convictions:

(a)What was the largest fine, and what was the smallest?

(b)What was the longest term of imprisonment, and what was the shortest?

8.How much money identified as owing has been collected?

No. 134.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

May 2, 2019—With respect to possible tax evasion in Switzerland, and, in particular, information obtained from HSBC Private Bank and disclosed in 2010, indicating 1,785 Canadian accounts, as of May 1, 2019:

1.How many Canadians (individuals, trusts, foundations and companies) have been determined to have had accounts in HSBC Private Bank?

2.How much money has been identified as owing to the Government of Canada?

3.How many Canadians (individuals, trusts, foundations and companies) have been charged with overseas tax evasion

4.What are the names of the individuals, companies, trusts and foundations charged?

5.In which court, and in which cities were these charges laid?

6.How many were convicted?

7.Of those convictions:

(a)What was the largest fine, and what was the smallest?

(b)What was the longest term of imprisonment, and what was the shortest?

8.How much money identified as owing has been collected?

No. 135.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

May 2, 2019—Regarding possible overseas tax evasion and the “Paradise Papers”, a 2017 leak of information from the law firm Appleby and the corporate registries of 19 tax jurisdictions, as of May 1, 2019:

1.How many Canadians (individuals, trusts, foundations and companies) have been identified by the Canada Revenue Agency as a result of this leak?

2.How much money has been identified as owing to the Government of Canada?

3.How many charges have been laid?

4.What are the names of the individuals, companies, trusts and foundations charged?

5.In which court, and in which cities were these charges laid?

6.What is the address and contact name for each individual, company, trust and foundation charged?

7.How many have been convicted?

8.Of those convictions:

(a)What was the largest fine, and what was the smallest?

(b)What was the longest term of imprisonment, and what was the shortest?

9.How much money identified as owing has been collected by the Canada Revenue Agency?

No. 136.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

May 9, 2019—With regard to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, and the granting of a visa waiver for citizens of a foreign country:

1.What is the temporary resident visa refusal rate, for the past five years, and for which data is available, for citizens of: (i) Romania, (ii) Bulgaria?

2.What is the rate of immigration rules violations, for the past five years, and for which data is available, for citizens of: (i) Romania, (ii) Bulgaria?

No. 137.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

May 9, 2019—With regard to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, and the granting of a visa waiver for citizens of a foreign country:

1.What is the temporary resident visa refusal rate, for the past five years, and for which data is available, for citizens of Mexico?

2.What is the rate of immigration rules violations, for the past five years, and for which data is available, for citizens of Mexico?

No. 138.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

June 4, 2019—With respect to a report in the Toronto Star on May 30th, about tax evasion in the real estate markets of Ontario and British Columbia, and claims that “Canada Revenue Agency audits have added more than $1 billion to government coffers”, would the Government of Canada provide the following information:

1.How many Canadians (individuals or companies/corporations) have been identified as having evaded taxes through real estate transactions?

2.How many non-Canadians (individuals or companies/corporations) have been identified as having evaded taxes through real estate transactions?

3.Of those Canadians (individuals or companies/corporations) identified, how many of them are being, or have been reviewed by the Canada Revenue Agency?

4.Of those non-Canadians (individuals or companies/corporations) identified, how many of them are being, or have been reviewed by the Canada Revenue Agency?

5.How many audits have been undertaken against these Canadians by the Canada Revenue Agency?

(a)How many reassessments or related compliance actions have been undertaken?

6.How many audits have been closed?

7.How many audits are still ongoing?

8.How many audits have been undertaken against these non-Canadians by the Canada Revenue Agency?

(a)How many reassessments or related compliance actions have been undertaken?

9.How many audits have been closed?

10.How many audits are still ongoing?

11.How many identified Canadians have availed themselves of the Voluntary Disclosure Program with the Canada Revenue Agency?

12.How many identified non-Canadians have availed themselves of the Voluntary Disclosure Program with the Canada Revenue Agency?

13.How many identified Canadians have settled with the Canada Revenue Agency?

14.How many identified non-Canadians have settled with the Canada Revenue Agency?

15.How much money, including unpaid taxes, fines, etc., has the Canada Revenue Agency assessed as a result of investigating these cases?

16.Regarding Question 15, what is the breakdown of the money assessed from these cases, specifically:

(a)in unpaid taxes;

(b)in interest;

(c)in fines; and

(d)in penalties?

17.How much of the money has been collected?

18.How many of these cases are under appeal?

19.How many cases remain open?

20.How many of the cases have been closed, i.e. the full amount of taxes, interest, fines and penalties have been collected?

21.How many tax evasion charges have been laid?

22.How many convictions have been recorded?