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Issue 40

Tuesday, May 25, 2021
2 p.m.

Orders Of The Day | Notice Paper | Written Questions


The Order Paper and Notice Paper is a document that guides the deliberations of the Senate and lists items of business currently before it. These items are listed in several different categories and in a priority according to an arrangement adopted by the Senate as stipulated in the rules. The majority of these items constitute the Orders of the Day which are called following Routine Proceedings. These items are themselves divided into two principal categories - government business and other business. Within each of these two categories are items for bills, motions, inquiries and reports of committees.

The Notice Paper contains the text of motions and inquiries not yet called for debate.

The Order Paper and Notice Paper is prepared every day in advance of the actual sitting.


Order of Business

(The following is an outline of a typical sitting day in the Senate. Variations are possible subject to the Rules and to the decisions of the Senate.)

Senators' Statements (18 minutes)

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS (30 minutes)

1. Tabling of Documents

2. Presenting or Tabling Reports from Committees

3. Government Notices of Motions

4. Government Notices of Inquiries

5. Introduction and First Reading of Government Bills

6. Introduction and First Reading of Senate Public Bills

7. First Reading of Commons Public Bills

8. Reading of Petitions for Private Bills

9. Introduction and First Reading of Private Bills

10. Tabling of Reports from Interparliamentary Delegations

11. Notices of Motions

12. Notices of Inquiries

13. Tabling of Petitions

Question Period (30 minutes)

Delayed Answers

ORDERS OF THE DAY

Government Business

Bills — Messages from the House of Commons

Bills — Third Reading

Bills — Reports of Committees

Bills — Second Reading

Reports of Committees — Other

Motions

Inquiries

Other

Other Business

Bills — Messages from the House of Commons

Senate Public Bills — Third Reading

Commons Public Bills — Third Reading

Private Bills — Third Reading

Senate Public Bills — Reports of Committees

Commons Public Bills — Reports of Committees

Private Bills — Reports of Committees

Senate Public Bills — Second Reading

Commons Public Bills — Second Reading

Private Bills — Second Reading

Reports of Committees — Other

Motions

Inquiries

Other

NOTICE PAPER

Notices of Motions

Notices of Inquiries


Orders Of The Day

Government Business

Bills – Messages from the House of Commons

Nil


Bills – Third Reading

Nil


Bills – Reports of Committees

Nil


Bills – Second Reading

No. 1.

May 6, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Harder, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Gold, P.C., for the second reading of Bill S-4, An Act to amend the Parliament of Canada Act and to make consequential and related amendments to other Acts.


Reports of Committees – Other

No. 3.

December 10, 2020—Consideration of the second report of the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs (Subject matter of Bill C-7, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (medical assistance in dying)), tabled in the Senate on December 10, 2020.


Motions

No. 1.

November 3, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Gagné, seconded by the Honourable Senator Petitclerc:

That the following Address be presented to Her Excellency the Governor General of Canada:

To Her Excellency the Right Honourable Julie Payette, Chancellor and Principal Companion of the Order of Canada, Chancellor and Commander of the Order of Military Merit, Chancellor and Commander of the Order of Merit of the Police Forces, Governor General and Commander-in-Chief of Canada.

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY:

We, Her Majesty’s most loyal and dutiful subjects, the Senate of Canada in Parliament assembled, beg leave to offer our humble thanks to Your Excellency for the gracious Speech which Your Excellency has addressed to both Houses of Parliament.


Inquiries

No. 1.

May 5, 2021—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Gagné, calling the attention of the Senate to the life of His late Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

No. 2.

May 6, 2021—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Gold, P.C., calling the attention of the Senate to the budget entitled Budget 2021: A Recovery Plan for Jobs, Growth, and Resilience, tabled in the House of Commons on April 19, 2021, by the Minister of Finance, the Honourable Chrystia Freeland, P.C., M.P., and in the Senate on April 20, 2021.


Other

Nil


Other Business

Rule 4-15(2) states:

Except as otherwise ordered by the Senate, any item of Other Business on the Order Paper and any motion or inquiry on the Notice Paper that have not been proceeded with during 15 sitting days shall be dropped from the Order Paper and Notice Paper.

Consequently, the number appearing in parentheses indicates the number of sittings since the item was last proceeded with.

Bills – Messages from the House of Commons

Nil


Senate Public Bills – Third Reading

Nil


Commons Public Bills – Third Reading

Nil


Private Bills – Third Reading

Nil


Senate Public Bills – Reports of Committees

Nil


Commons Public Bills – Reports of Committees

Nil


Private Bills – Reports of Committees

Nil


Senate Public Bills – Second Reading

No. 1.

September 30, 2020—Second reading of Bill S-201, An Act to amend the Constitution Act, 1867 and the Parliament of Canada Act (Speaker of the Senate).—(Honourable Senator Mercer)

No. 2.

May 6, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Moncion, seconded by the Honourable Senator Woo, for the second reading of Bill S-202, An Act to amend the Assisted Human Reproduction Act.—(Honourable Senator Moncion)

No. 3.

May 6, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Dalphond, seconded by the Honourable Senator Boehm, for the second reading of Bill S-206, An Act to change the name of the electoral district of Châteauguay—Lacolle.—(Honourable Senator Dalphond)

No. 4. (five)

October 27, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Pate, seconded by the Honourable Senator Boehm, for the second reading of Bill S-207, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (independence of the judiciary).—(Honourable Senator Duncan)

No. 5. (one)

November 3, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Pate, seconded by the Honourable Senator Galvez, for the second reading of Bill S-208, An Act to amend the Criminal Records Act, to make consequential amendments to other Acts and to repeal a regulation.—(Honourable Senator Duncan)

No. 6. (four)

November 5, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McPhedran, seconded by the Honourable Senator Loffreda, for the second reading of Bill S-209, An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act and the Regulation Adapting the Canada Elections Act for the Purposes of a Referendum (voting age).—(Honourable Senator Duncan)

No. 7. (five)

October 27, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Moodie, seconded by the Honourable Senator Mégie, for the second reading of Bill S-210, An Act to establish the Office of the Commissioner for Children and Youth in Canada.—(Honourable Senator Duncan)

No. 8. (six)

October 29, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Boisvenu, seconded by the Honourable Senator Dagenais, for the second reading of Bill S-212, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (disclosure of information by jurors).—(Honourable Senator Duncan)

No. 9. (four)

November 3, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McCallum, seconded by the Honourable Senator McPhedran, for the second reading of Bill S-213, An Act to amend the Department for Women and Gender Equality Act.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 10. (twelve)

October 29, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Patterson, seconded by the Honourable Senator Batters, for the second reading of Bill S-214, An Act to amend the Constitution Act, 1867 (property qualifications of Senators).—(Honourable Senator Duncan)

No. 11. (twelve)

October 28, 2020—Second reading of Bill S-215, An Act to amend the Citizenship Act and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.—(Honourable Senator Jaffer)

No. 12. (one)

May 4, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Dalphond, seconded by the Honourable Senator Munson, for the second reading of Bill S-217, An Act to amend the Canada Labour Code (successive contracts for services).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 13. (eight)

November 19, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Sinclair, seconded by the Honourable Senator Pate, for the second reading of Bill S-218, An Act to amend the Criminal Code and the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act (great apes, elephants and certain other animals).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 14. (six)

December 3, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Boisvenu, seconded by the Honourable Senator Seidman, for the second reading of Bill S-219, An Act to amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act (disclosure of information to victims).—(Honourable Senator Pate)

No. 15. (three)

March 17, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Griffin, seconded by the Honourable Senator Galvez, for the second reading of Bill S-220, An Act to amend the Department of Public Works and Government Services Act (use of wood).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 16. (five)

December 8, 2020—Second reading of Bill S-221, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (mischief related to memorials to first responders).—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 17.

March 16, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Omidvar, seconded by the Honourable Senator Woo, for the second reading of Bill S-222, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (use of resources).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 18. (four)

March 16, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Boisvenu, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin, for the second reading of Bill S-224, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (increasing parole ineligibility).—(Honourable Senator Pate)

No. 19.

May 6, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Carignan, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Seidman, for the second reading of Bill S-225, An Act to amend the Copyright Act (remuneration for journalistic works).

No. 20. (three)

March 15, 2021—Second reading of Bill S-226, An Act respecting the repurposing of certain seized, frozen or sequestrated assets.—(Honourable Senator Omidvar)

No. 21. (one)

March 30, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McCallum, seconded by the Honourable Senator Galvez, for the second reading of Bill S-227, An Act respecting a National Ribbon Skirt Day.—(Honourable Senator Forest-Niesing)

No. 22. (two)

March 16, 2021—Second reading of Bill S-228, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (trafficking in persons).—(Honourable Senator Ataullahjan)

No. 23. (two)

March 16, 2021—Second reading of Bill S-229, An Act respecting the development of a national strategy for the decriminalization of illegal substances, to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts.—(Honourable Senator Boniface)

No. 24. (one)

March 30, 2021—Second reading of Bill S-230, An Act to amend the Citizenship Act (granting citizenship to certain Canadians).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 25.

May 4, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Boisvenu, seconded by the Honourable Senator Seidman, for the second reading of Bill S-231, An Act to amend the Criminal Code and to make consequential amendments to another Act (interim release and domestic violence recognizance orders).—(Honourable Senator Duncan)

No. 26. (one)

March 30, 2021—Second reading of Bill S-232, An Act to amend the Governor General’s Act (retiring annuity and other benefits).—(Honourable Senator Carignan, P.C.)

No. 27.

May 4, 2021—Second reading of Bill S-233, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (criminal interest rate).—(Honourable Senator Ringuette)


Commons Public Bills – Second Reading

No. 1.

May 4, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Wells, seconded by the Honourable Senator Seidman, for the second reading of Bill C-218, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (sports betting).—(Honourable Senator White)

No. 2.

May 6, 2021—Second reading of Bill C-228, An Act to establish a federal framework to reduce recidivism.—(Honourable Senator Plett)


Private Bills – Second Reading

Nil


Reports of Committees – Other

Nil


Motions

No. 1. (eight)

November 5, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Transport and Communications be authorized to examine and report on the causes for the declining number of viewers for the English television service of the CBC, despite increased funding with taxpayer dollars, including but not limited to a review of the level of adherence to the requirement to provide uniquely Canadian content, and the use by CBC of public funds to unfairly compete with other media outlets with its digital service, when and if the committee is formed; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than February 28, 2021.—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 2. (eight)

November 5, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade be authorized to examine and report on the situation in Hong Kong, when and if the committee is formed; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than February 28, 2021.—(Honourable Senator Dasko)

No. 3. (six)

November 5, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin:

That the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence be authorized to examine and report on the prospect of allowing Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. to be part of Canada’s 5G network, when and if the committee is formed; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than February 28, 2021.—(Honourable Senator Dasko)

No. 4. (ten)

October 29, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Smith:

That the Senate of Canada call upon the Government of Canada to impose sanctions, pursuant to the Justice for Victims of Corrupt Foreign Officials Act (Sergei Magnitsky Law), against Chinese officials in relation to the human rights abuses and systematic persecution of Uighur Muslims in China.—(Honourable Senator Omidvar)

No. 5. (nine)

October 29, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Oh:

That the Senate of Canada call upon the Government of Canada to impose sanctions, pursuant to the Justice for Victims of Corrupt Foreign Officials Act (Sergei Magnitsky Law), against Chinese and Hong Kong officials for the violation of human rights, civil liberties and the principles of fundamental justice and rule of law in relation to the ongoing pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong.—(Honourable Senator Jaffer)

No. 6. (five)

November 5, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin:

That the Senate of Canada call upon the Government of Canada to conduct and publish an analysis, no later than March 30, 2021, on Iran-sponsored terrorism, incitement to hatred, and human rights violations, emanating from Iran and to identify and impose sanctions, pursuant to the Justice for Victims of Corrupt Foreign Officials Act (Sergei Magnitsky Law), against Iranian officials responsible for those activities.—(Honourable Senator Dasko)

No. 8. (eight)

November 5, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin:

That the Senate call upon the Government of Canada, in accordance with the Federal Framework on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Act, which requires that a federal framework on post-traumatic stress disorder be laid before Parliament by December 21, 2019, to provide to the Senate a report on the implementation of such a framework.—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 10. (eight)

November 5, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin:

That, notwithstanding any provision of the Rules or usual practice:

1.for the duration of the current session, at the start of Orders of the Day on every third Tuesday that the Senate sits after the adoption of this order, the Senate resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole in order to receive a minister of the Crown to respond to questions relating to his or her ministerial responsibilities, with the minister to be designated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate following consultation with the leaders and facilitators of the other recognized parties and parliamentary groups;

2.the committee report to the Senate no later than 125 minutes after it starts sitting;

3. the minister be given five minutes at the start of the Committee of the Whole for any declaration; and

4. if the designated minister is unable to attend on a particular Tuesday:

(a)the Leader or Deputy Leader of the Government in the Senate advise the Senate of this fact as soon as possible by making a brief statement to that effect at any time during the sitting; and

(b)the designated minister’s appearance be then postponed to the next Tuesday that the Senate sits, subject to the same conditions.—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 11. (four)

November 5, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade be authorized to examine and report on Turkey’s increased aggression and acts against international law, including but not limited to the Exclusive Economic Zone of Greece and other nations in the Mediterranean, under the provisions of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, when and if the committee is formed; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than March 28, 2021.—(Honourable Senator Dasko)

No. 12. (six)

November 5, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin:

That the Senate call upon the Government of Canada to condemn President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s unilateral actions relating to the status of the Hagia Sophia and to call on Turkey to adhere to its legal commitments and obligations in accordance with Hagia Sophia’s inclusion on UNESCO’s World Heritage List. —(Honourable Senator Dasko)

No. 13. (nine)

November 3, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights be authorized to examine and report on the ongoing persecution and unlawful detention of Uighur Muslims in mainland China, when and if the committee is formed; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than February 28, 2021.—(Honourable Senator Omidvar)

No. 14. (three)

November 5, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Official Languages be authorized to examine and report on the Government of Canada’s decision to award a contract for a student grant program to WE Charity, a third party without the capacity to do so in both official languages, in apparent contravention of Canada’s Official Languages Act, when and if the committee is formed; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than February 28, 2021.—(Honourable Senator Dupuis)

No. 17. (four)

October 27, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McCallum, seconded by the Honourable Senator Loffreda:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources be authorized to examine and report on the cumulative impacts of resource extraction and development, and their effects on environmental, economic and social considerations, when and if the committee is formed; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than December 31, 2021.—(Honourable Senator Tannas)

No. 18. (five)

November 19, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, seconded by the Honourable Senator Harder, P.C.:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce, when and if it is formed, be authorized to examine and report on the need to review the Bank of Canada Act in order to:

(a)specify that the Bank of Canada’s mandate covers not only price stability, but also the pursuit of maximum employment or full and productive employment, as is the case in the United States, Australia and, recently, New Zealand;

(b)provide for transparency measures regarding the procedure and choice of indicators for the setting of the key policy interest rate, as well as analyses of how the conduct of monetary policy affects the inflation rate, employment and income distribution, and report to Parliament; and

(c)propose to the Minister of Finance items to be included in the five-year agreement between the Bank of Canada and the Government that is to be signed in 2021; and

That the committee submit its final report to the Senate no later than March 31, 2021.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 27.

October 27, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Deacon (Ontario), for the Honourable Senator Lankin, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Pate:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology, when and if it is formed, be authorized to examine and report on the future of workers in order to evaluate:

(a)how data and information on the gig economy in Canada is being collected and potential gaps in knowledge;

(b)the effectiveness of current labour protections for people who work through digital platforms and temporary foreign workers programs;

(c)the negative impacts of precarious work and the gig economy on benefits, pensions and other government services relating to employment; and

(d)the accessibility of retraining and skills development programs for workers;

That, in conducting this evaluation, the committee pay particular attention to the negative effects of precarious employment being disproportionately felt by workers of colour, new immigrant and Indigenous workers; and

That the committee submit its final report on this study to the Senate no later than September 30, 2022.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 29. (two)

November 19, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Boyer, seconded by the Honourable Senator Woo:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights be authorized to examine and report on the forced and coerced sterilization of persons in Canada, particularly related to Indigenous women, when and if the committee is formed; and

That the committee submit its final report on this study to the Senate no later than December 30, 2021.—(Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson)

No. 31. (four)

October 28, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Pate, seconded by the Honourable Senator Boehm:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights be authorized to examine and report on issues relating to the human rights of federally sentenced persons in the correctional system, with reference to both national and international law and standards, as well as to examine the situation of marginalized or disadvantaged groups in federal prisons, including Black and Indigenous Peoples, racialized persons, women and those with mental health concerns, when and if the committee is formed;

That the papers and evidence received and taken and work accomplished by the committee on this subject during the First Session of the Forty-second Parliament be referred to the committee; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than June 30, 2021.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 33. (eight)

October 29, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Moncion, seconded by the Honourable Senator Cormier:

That the Senate of Canada call upon the Government of Canada to introduce legislation that would freeze the sessional allowances of parliamentarians for a period that the government considers appropriate in light of the economic situation and the ongoing pandemic or for a maximum period of three years.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 39. (three)

December 1, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Brazeau, seconded by the Honourable Senator Harder, P.C.:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology be authorized to examine and report on suicide prevention and mental health needs among Canadian boys and men, and the overrepresentation of Indigenous peoples in suicide statistics, when and if the committee is formed; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than December 31, 2021.

No. 40. (two)

November 5, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Francis, seconded by the Honourable Senator Pate:

That the Senate affirm and honour the 1999 Supreme Court of Canada Marshall decision, and call upon the Government of Canada to do likewise, upholding Mi’kmaw treaty rights to a moderate livelihood fishery, as established by Peace and Friendship Treaties signed in 1760 and 1761, and as enshrined in section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982; and

That the Senate condemn the violent and criminal acts interfering with the exercise of these treaty rights and requests immediate respect for and enforcement of the criminal laws of Canada, including protection for Mi’kmaw fishers and communities.—(Honourable Senator Wells)

No. 41. (one)

November 5, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McCallum, seconded by the Honourable Senator McPhedran:

That the Senate of Canada call on the federal government to adopt anti-racism as the sixth pillar of the Canada Health Act, prohibiting discrimination based on race and affording everyone the equal right to the protection and benefit of the law.—(Honourable Senator Pate)

No. 43. (five)

November 5, 2020—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Marwah, seconded by the Honourable Senator Woo:

That, notwithstanding any provision of the Rules or usual practices, and taking into account the exceptional circumstances of the current pandemic of COVID-19, the Standing Senate Committee on Internal Economy, Budgets and Administration have the power to meet by videoconference or teleconference;

That senators be allowed to participate in meetings of the committee by videoconference or teleconference from a designated office or designated residence within Canada, that they be considered, for all purposes, to be meetings of the committee in question, and senators taking part in such meetings be considered, for all purposes, to be present at the meeting;

That, for greater certainty, and without limiting the general authority granted by this order, when the committee meet by videoconference or teleconference:

1. members of the committee participating count towards quorum;

2. such meetings be considered to be occurring in the parliamentary precinct, irrespective of where participants may be; and

3.the committee be directed to approach in camera meetings with all necessary precaution, taking account of the risks to confidentiality inherent in such technologies;

That, subject to variations that may be required by the circumstances, to participate by videoconference senators must:

1.use a desktop or laptop computer and headphones with integrated microphone provided by the Senate for videoconferences; and

2. not use other devices such as personal tablets or smartphones;

That, when the committee meet by videoconference or teleconference, the provisions of rule 14-7(2) be applied so as to allow recording or broadcasting through any facilities arranged by the Clerk of the Senate, and, if a meeting being broadcast or recorded cannot be broadcast live, the committee be considered to have fulfilled the requirement that a meeting be public by making any available recording publicly available as soon as possible thereafter; and

That, pursuant to rule 12-18(2), the committee have the power to meet on any day the Senate does not sit, whether the Senate is then adjourned for a period of more or less than a week.

No. 49. (one)

March 30, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Cormier, seconded by the Honourable Senator Woo:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Official Languages be authorized to study and to report on the application of the Official Languages Act and of the regulations and directives made under it, within those institutions subject to the Act;

That the committee also be authorized to study the reports and documents published by the Minister of Canadian Heritage, the Minister of Economic Development and Official Languages, the President of the Treasury Board and the Commissioner of Official Languages, and any other subject concerning official languages;

That the documents received, evidence heard and business accomplished on this subject by the committee since the beginning of the First Session of the Forty-second Parliament be referred to the committee; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than December 17, 2021, and that the committee retain all powers necessary to publicize its findings for 180 days after the tabling of the final report.


Inquiries

No. 1. (nine)

October 27, 2020—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Plett, calling the attention of the Senate to the presence of racism and discrimination within Canadian institutions.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 2. (two)

December 1, 2020—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Plett, calling the attention of the Senate to the Province of Manitoba’s one hundred and fiftieth anniversary.—(Honourable Senator McCallum)

No. 5.

October 27, 2020—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Seidman, calling the attention of the Senate to weaknesses within Canada’s long-term care system, which have been exposed by the COVID-19 pandemic.—(Honourable Senator Duncan)

No. 7. (five)

November 3, 2020—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Wallin, calling the attention of the Senate to:

(a)a September 2019 Quebec Superior Court ruling, which declared parts of federal and provincial law relating to medical assistance in dying (MAiD) to be too restrictive;

(b)the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on MAiD recipients and practitioners, including restrictions to access, shortages of personal protective equipment and a surge in demand;

(c)the ongoing and tireless work of Dying with Dignity Canada, a non-for-profit organization that advocates for vulnerable Canadians regarding their right to die;

(d)the findings of the federally mandated, December 2018 Canadian Association of Academies report relating to advance requests in medical assistance in dying; and

(e)the urgent need for the Senate to study and propose new rules pertaining to advance requests for medical assistance in dying.—(Honourable Senator Black (Ontario))

No. 9. (two)

December 1, 2020—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Moodie, calling the attention of the Senate to the career of former senator the Honourable Landon Pearson.—(Honourable Senator Munson)

No. 10.

December 1, 2020—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Omidvar, calling the attention of the Senate to the link between Canada’s past, present and future prosperity and its deep connection to immigration.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 12. (one)

December 10, 2020—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Cordy, calling the attention of the Senate to the career of former senator the Honourable Lillian Eva Dyck.—(Honourable Senator Duncan)


Other

Nil


Notice Paper

Motions

No. 20. (nine)

By the Honourable Senator Dalphond:

September 30, 2020—That, notwithstanding any provision of the Rules, previous order or usual practice, upon the adoption of this order, and for the remainder of the current session, no Senate committee be considered a standing or special committee for the purposes of paragraphs 62.1(1)(g) and (h) of the Parliament of Canada Act.

No. 21. (nine)

By the Honourable Senator Martin, for the Honourable Senator Frum:

September 30, 2020—That the Senate recognize and support the Abraham Accords, an historic peace agreement between Israel, the United Arab Emirates, and Bahrain that formally establishes diplomatic relations between those three countries; and

That the Senate further encourages other Arab countries in the Middle East to build on this agreement and restore diplomatic relations with Israel.

No. 22. (nine)

By the Honourable Senator Martin, for the Honourable Senator Frum:

September 30, 2020—That the Senate, which would not exist without him, recognize the signal and historic contribution that Canada’s first Prime Minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, made to the founding of this country, which remains one of the world’s greatest democracies; and

That the Senate recognize that, while Sir John A. Macdonald’s legacy is not without flaw, judging him by the standards that apply today is a disservice to not only the ongoing march of history but to the parliamentary system of government he helped create that allowed progress to take place.

No. 23. (nine)

By the Honourable Senator Martin, for the Honourable Senator Frum:

September 30, 2020—That the Senate unreservedly condemn the state-sanctioned torture and murder by the Iranian regime of Iranian national champion wrestler Navid Afkari, and the continuing torture and imprisonment of his brothers and others, all for their role in peaceful protests against the corruption of the same regime; and

That the Senate recognize that these flagrant human rights transgressions are consistent with a long history of human rights abuses by an outlaw regime that is the world’s leading sponsor of terrorism and the biggest obstacle to peace in the Middle East.

No. 24. (nine)

By the Honourable Senator Martin, for the Honourable Senator Frum:

September 30, 2020—That, in light of the public mistrust of charities generated by the scandal that enveloped the WE Charity, the Senate affirm its faith in the charitable sector in Canada and laud the efforts of the many volunteers and staff that devote their time and energy to worthy causes at home and abroad to make this world a better place while seeking little or no attention or reward for themselves or their efforts.

No. 25. (nine)

By the Honourable Senator Martin:

September 30, 2020—That the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence, which in previous Parliaments conducted comprehensive studies on Canada’s emergency preparedness, including pandemic preparedness, be authorized to examine and report on the management and mismanagement by the current government of Canada’s National Emergency Strategic Stockpile system in the years and months leading up to the outbreak of COVID-19, when and if the committee is formed; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than March 31, 2021.

No. 26. (nine)

By the Honourable Senator Ngo:

September 30, 2020—That the Senate urge the Government of Canada to actively support the genuine autonomy of Tibet and, consequently, to also call for the People’s Republic of China to:

(a)renew the Sino-Tibetan dialogue in good faith and based on the Middle Way Approach;

(b)respect the religious rights of the Tibetan people and stop interference in the process of recognizing a successor or reincarnation of the 14th Dalai Lama;

(c)respect the linguistic rights, freedom of movement, thought and conscience of the people in Tibet;

(d)free all Tibetan political prisoners, including the youngest political prisoner Gendhun Choekyi Nyima (Panchen Lama), and cease all arbitrary detention of dissidents;

(e)grant Canada reciprocal diplomatic access to Tibet without limitations; and

(f)protect the Tibetan Plateau that serves as Asia’s water tower, feeding over a billion lives in Asia; and

That the Senate urge the Government of Canada to raise Tibetan issues at every opportunity with China with a view to taking the additional steps necessary to deescalate tensions and restore peace and stability in Tibet.

No. 28. (nine)

By the Honourable Senator Tannas:

October 1, 2020—That, notwithstanding any provision of the Rules, previous order or usual practice:

1.except as provided in this order, the question not be put on the motion for third reading of a government bill unless the orders for resuming debate at second and third reading have, together, been called at least three times, in addition to the sittings at which the motions for second and third readings were moved;

2.when a government bill has been read a first time, and before a motion is moved to set the date for second reading, the Leader of the Government in the Senate or the Deputy Leader of the Government in the Senate may, without notice, move that the bill be deemed an urgent matter, and that the provisions of paragraph 1 of this order not apply to proceedings on the bill;

3.when a motion has been moved pursuant to paragraph 2 of this order, the following provisions apply:

(a)the debate shall only deal with whether the bill should be deemed an urgent matter or not;

(b)the debate shall not be adjourned;

(c)the debate shall last a maximum of 20 minutes;

(d)no senator shall speak for more than 5 minutes;

(e)no senators shall speak more than once;

(f)the debate shall not be interrupted for any purpose, except for the reading of a message from the Crown or an event announced in such a message;

(g)the debate may continue beyond the ordinary time of adjournment, if necessary, until the conclusion of the debate and consequential business;

(h)the time taken in debate and for any vote shall not count as part of Routine Proceedings;

(i)no amendment or other motion shall be received, except a motion that a certain senator be now heard or do now speak;

(j)when debate concludes or the time for debate expires, the Speaker shall put the question; and

(k)any standing vote requested shall not be deferred, and the bells shall ring for only 15 minutes.

No. 34. (seven)

By the Honourable Senator Dalphond:

October 27, 2020—That the Senate recognizes that it would be unbecoming of a public institution, particularly at this time of the COVID-19 pandemic and economic hardship for Canadians, to use taxpayer funds to increase the salaries of senators by creating additional paid positions on Senate committees, beyond the positions provided for in the Rules of the Senate.

No. 45. (three)

By the Honourable Senator Bovey:

November 5, 2020—That the Rules of the Senate be amended by:

(a)deleting the word “and” at the end of rule 12-7(16) in the English version; and

(b)replacing the period at the end of rule 12-7(17) by the following:

“; and

Arctic

12-7. (18) the Standing Senate Committee on the Arctic, to which may be referred matters relating to the Arctic generally.”.

No. 52. (one)

By the Honourable Senator MacDonald:

December 1, 2020—That the Standing Senate Committee on Transport and Communications be authorized to examine and report on the elements related to its mandate found in the ministerial mandate letters of the Minister of Transport, the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, the Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry and the Minister of Canadian Heritage; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than September 30, 2022.

No. 56. (one)

By the Honourable Senator Duncan:

December 1, 2020—That, until the Speaker is satisfied that health and safety is not at risk, having reference to public health guidelines issued by local authorities, all senators present in the Senate Chamber during its sittings, or in one of its committee rooms during a committee meeting, be required to wear a mask at all times, except when intervening in debate or another proceeding of the Senate or one of its committees.

No. 57. (one)

By the Honourable Senator Ataullahjan:

December 2, 2020—That the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights be authorized to examine and monitor issues relating to human rights and, inter alia, to review the machinery of government dealing with Canada’s international and national human rights obligations; and

That the committee submit its final report to the Senate no later than September 30, 2023.

No. 61.

By the Honourable Senator McCallum:

December 8, 2020—That, as the actions of Senator Lynn Beyak have brought the Senate into disrepute, and notwithstanding any provision of the Rules or usual practice, she be expelled from the Senate and that her seat be declared vacant;

That, notwithstanding any provision of the Senate Administrative Rules, and the Senators’ Office Management Policy, the Standing Committee on Internal Economy, Budgets and Administration be authorized to determine the resources, if any, to be made available to Senator Beyak as a departing senator; and

That a copy of this order be communicated to Her Excellency the Governor General.

No. 63.

By the Honourable Senator Manning:

December 10, 2020—That the Standing Senate Committee on Fisheries and Oceans be authorized to examine and to report on issues relating to the federal government’s current and evolving policy framework for managing Canada’s fisheries and oceans;

That the papers and evidence received and taken and work accomplished by the committee on this subject during the First Session of the Forty-second Parliament be referred to the committee; and

That the committee submit its final report to the Senate no later than December 31, 2022, and that the committee retain all powers necessary to publicize its findings for 180 days after the tabling of the final report.

No. 64.

By the Honourable Senator Omidvar:

December 10, 2020—That, in light of a recent Nanos poll demonstrating strong support amongst Canadians to provide a way for temporary foreign workers to remain in Canada, the Senate call on the Government of the Canada to create pathways to citizenship or permanent residency for essential temporary migrant workers across all sectors; and

That the Senate call on the Government of Canada to table a status report on this issue within 100 days of the adoption of this order.

No. 65.

By the Honourable Senator Tannas:

December 16, 2020—That the Rules of the Senate be amended:

1.by replacing rule 3-6(2) by the following:

“Adjournment extended

3-6. (2) Whenever the Senate stands adjourned, if the Speaker is satisfied that the public interest does not require the Senate to meet at the date and time stipulated in the adjournment order, the Speaker shall, after consulting all the leaders and facilitators, or their designates, determine an appropriate later date or time for the next sitting.”;

2.by replacing rule 4-2(8)(a) by the following:

“Extending time for Senators’ Statements

4-2. (8)(a) At the request of a whip or the designated representative of a recognized party or recognized parliamentary group, the Speaker shall, at an appropriate time during Senators’ Statements, seek leave of the Senate to extend Statements. If leave is granted, Senators’ Statements shall be extended by no more than 30 minutes.”;

3.by replacing rule 4-3(1) by the following:

“Tributes

4-3. (1) At the request of any leader or facilitator, the period for Senators’ Statements shall be extended by no more than 15 minutes for the purpose of paying tribute to a current or former Senator.”;

4.by replacing rules 6-3(1)(a), (b), (c) and (d) by the following:

“Leaders and facilitators

(a) any leader or facilitator shall be permitted up to 45 minutes for debate;

Sponsor of a bill

(b) the sponsor of a bill shall be allowed up to 45 minutes for debate at second and third reading;

Critic of a bill

(c) the critic of a bill shall be allowed up to 45 minutes for debate at second and third reading;

Spokesperson on a bill

(d) the spokesperson on a bill from each recognized party and recognized parliamentary group, except those of the sponsor and critic, shall be allowed up to 45 minutes for debate at second and third reading; and

Others

(e) other Senators shall speak for no more than 15 minutes in debate.”;

5.by replacing rule 6-5(1)(b) by the following:

“(b) the time remaining, not to exceed 15 minutes, if the Senator who yielded is a leader or facilitator.”;

6.by replacing the portion of rule 7-1(1) before paragraph (a) by the following:

“Agreement to allocate time

7-1. (1) At any time during a sitting, the Leader or the Deputy Leader of the Government may state that the representatives of the recognized parties and recognized parliamentary groups have agreed to allocate a specified number of days or hours either:”;

7.by replacing the portion of rule 7-2(1) before paragraph (a) by the following:

“No agreement to allocate time

7-2. (1) At any time during a sitting, the Leader or the Deputy Leader of the Government may state that the representatives of the recognized parties and recognized parliamentary groups have failed to agree to allocate time to conclude an adjourned debate on either:”;

8.by replacing rule 7-3(1)(f) by the following:

“(f) Senators may speak for a maximum of 10 minutes each, provided that a leader or facilitator may speak for up to 30 minutes;”;

9.by replacing rules 9-5(1), (2) and (3) by the following:

“(1) The Speaker shall ask the whips and the designated representatives of the recognized parties and recognized parliamentary groups if there is an agreement on the length of time the bells shall ring.

(2) The time agreed to shall not be more than 60 minutes.

(3) With leave of the Senate, the agreement on the length of the bells shall constitute an order to sound the bells for that length of time.”;

10.by replacing rule 9-10(1) by the following:

“Deferral of standing vote

9-10. (1) Except as provided in subsection (5) and elsewhere in these Rules, when a standing vote has been requested on a question that is debatable, a whip or the designated representative of a recognized party or recognized parliamentary group may defer the vote.

EXCEPTIONS

Rule 7-3(1)(h): Procedure for debate on motion to allocate time

Rule 7-4(5): Question put on time-allocated order

Rule 12-30(7): Deferred vote on report

Rule 12-32(3)(e): Procedure in Committee of the Whole

Rule 13-6(8): Vote on case of privilege automatically deferred in certain circumstances”;

11.by replacing rule 9-10(4) by the following:

“Vote deferred to Friday

9-10. (4) Except as otherwise provided, if a vote has been deferred to a Friday, a whip or the designated representative of a recognized party or recognized parliamentary group may, at any time during a sitting, further defer the vote to 5:30 p.m. on the next sitting day, provided that if the Senate only meets after 5 p.m. on that day, the vote shall take place immediately before the Orders of the Day.

EXCEPTIONS

Rule 12-30(7): Deferred vote on report

Rule 13-6(8): Vote on case of privilege automatically deferred in certain circumstances”;

12.by replacing rule 12-3(3) by the following:

“Ex officio members

12-3.(3) In addition to the membership provided for in subsections (1) and (2), the Leader of the Government, or the Deputy Leader if the Leader is absent, and the leader or facilitator of each recognized party and recognized parliamentary group, or a designate if a leader or facilitator is absent, are ex officio members of all committees except the Standing Committee on Ethics and Conflict of Interest for Senators, the Standing Committee on Audit and Oversight, and the joint committees. The ex officio members of committees have all the rights and obligations of a member of a committee.”;

13.by replacing rule 12-8(2) by the following:

“Service fee proposals

12-8. (2) When the Leader or Deputy Leader of the Government tables a service fee proposal, it is deemed referred to the standing or special committee designated by the Leader or Deputy Leader of the Government following consultations with the leaders and facilitators of the recognized parties and recognized parliamentary groups, or their designates.

REFERENCE

Service Fees Act, subsection 15(1)”;

14.by replacing rule 12-18(2)(b)(ii) by the following:

“(ii) with the signed consent of the majority of the leaders and facilitators, or their designates, in response to a written request from the chair and deputy chair.”;

15.by replacing rule 12-27(1) by the following:

“Appointment of committee

12-27. (1) As soon as practicable at the beginning of each session, the Leader of the Government shall move a motion, seconded by the other leaders and the facilitators, on the membership of the Standing Committee on Ethics and Conflict of Interest for Senators. This motion shall be deemed adopted without debate or vote, and a similar motion shall be moved for any substitutions in the membership of the committee.

REFERENCE

Ethics and Conflict of Interest Code for Senators, subsection 35(4)”;

16.in Appendix I:

(a)by replacing the words “(Porte-parole d’un projet de loi)” at the end of the definition of “Critic of a bill” by the words “(Critique d’un projet de loi)”;

(b)by deleting the definition “Ordinary procedure for determining duration of bells”; and

(c)by adding the following new definitions in alphabetical order:

Designated representative of a recognized party or a recognized parliamentary group

The Senator designated from time to time by the leader or facilitator of a recognized party or a recognized parliamentary group without a whip as that group or party’s representative for a purpose or purposes set out in these Rules. (Représentant désigné d’un parti reconnu ou d’un groupe parlementaire reconnu)”;

Leaders and facilitators

The Government Leader and the leaders and facilitators of the recognized parties and recognized parliamentary groups (see definitions of “Leader of the Government”, “Leader of the Opposition” and “Leader or facilitator of a recognized party or recognized parliamentary group”). (Leaders et facilitateurs)”; and

Spokesperson on a bill

The lead Senator speaking on a bill from each recognized party and recognized parliamentary group, as designated by the leader or facilitator of the party or group in question. (Porte-parole d’un projet de loi)”; and

17.by updating all cross references in the Rules, including the lists of exceptions, accordingly; and

That the Ethics and Conflict of Interest Code for Senators be amended by deleting subsection 35(5), and renumbering other subsections and cross-references accordingly.

No. 69.

By the Honourable Senator McCallum:

February 8, 2021—That the Senate of Canada:

(a)acknowledge that racism, in all its forms, was a cornerstone upon which the residential school system was created;

(b)acknowledge that racism, discrimination and abuse were rampant within the residential school system;

(c)acknowledge that the residential school system, created for the malevolent purpose of assimilation, has had profound and continuing negative impacts on Indigenous lives, cultures and languages; and

(d)apologize unreservedly for Canada’s role in the establishment of the residential school system, as well as its resulting adverse impacts, the effects of which are still seen and felt by countless Indigenous peoples and communities today.

No. 71.

By the Honourable Senator Petitclerc:

February 8, 2021—That, notwithstanding the order of the Senate adopted on Tuesday, December 1, 2020, the date for the final report of the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology in relation to its study on the implementation and success of a federal framework on post-traumatic stress disorder by the Government of Canada be extended from February 28, 2021 to October 28, 2021.

No. 72.

By the Honourable Senator Petitclerc:

February 8, 2021—That the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology be authorized to examine and report on the government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including the impact of the pandemic on vulnerable groups and the scientific research on COVID-19;

That, in particular, the committee examine the specific effects of the pandemic on Indigenous peoples, racialized communities, and people with disabilities;

That the papers and evidence received and taken and the work accomplished by the committee on this subject during the First Session of the Forty-third Parliament be referred to the committee; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than June 18, 2021.

No. 73.

By the Honourable Senator Boniface:

February 8, 2021—That the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence be authorized to examine and report on Canada’s national security and defence policies, practices, circumstances and capabilities; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than December 31, 2021.

No. 75.

By the Honourable Senator McPhedran:

February 17, 2021—That, in relation to Senator Leila M. de Lima, an incumbent senator of the Republic of the Philippines, who was arrested and has been arbitrarily detained since February 24, 2017, on politically motivated illegal drug trading charges filed against her by the Duterte government, and who continues to be detained without bail, despite the lack of any material evidence presented by the Philippine government prosecutors, the Senate:

(a)condemn the Philippine government’s unjust and arbitrary detention of Senator Leila M. de Lima;

(b)urge the Philippine government to immediately release Senator de Lima, drop all charges against her, remove restrictions on her personal and work conditions and allow her to fully discharge her legislative mandate;

(c)call on the government of Canada to invoke sanctions pursuant to the Justice for Victims of Corrupt Foreign Officials Act (Sergei Magnitsky Law) against all Philippine government officials complicit in the jailing of Senator de Lima;

(d)call on the Philippine government to recognize the primacy of human rights and the rule of law, as well as the importance of human rights defenders and their work and allow them to operate freely without fear of reprisal; and

(e)urge other parliamentarians and governments globally to likewise pressure the Duterte government to protect, promote and uphold human rights and the rule of law as essential pillars of a free and functioning democratic society in the Philippines.

No. 76.

By the Honourable Senator Ngo:

February 17, 2021—That the Senate note that, by adopting the Journey to Freedom Day Act on April 23, 2015, and taking into account the first two elements of the preamble of the said Act, the Parliament of Canada unequivocally recognized violations of:

(a)the Agreement on Ending the War and Restoring Peace in Viet-Nam and its protocols (Paris Peace Accords); and

(b)the Act of the International Conference on Viet-Nam; and

That the Senate urge the Government of Canada to call upon six or more of the current parties to the Act of the International Conference on Viet-Nam, which include Canada, France, Hungary, Indonesia, Poland, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States of America, amongst others, to agree to the reconvention of the International Conference on Viet-Nam pursuant to Article 7(b) of the Act of the International Conference on Viet-Nam in order to settle disputes between the signatory parties due to the violations of the terms of the Paris Peace Accords and the Act of the International Conference on Viet-Nam.

No. 79.

By the Honourable Senator Housakos:

March 15, 2021—That,

(a)in the opinion of the Senate, the People’s Republic of China has engaged in actions consistent with the United Nations General Assembly Resolution 260, commonly known as the “Genocide Convention”, including detention camps and measures intended to prevent births as it pertains to Uyghurs and other Turkic Muslims; and

(b)given that (i) where possible, it has been the policy of the Government of Canada to act in concert with its allies when it comes to the recognition of a genocide, (ii) there is a bipartisan consensus in the United States where it has been the position of two consecutive administrations that Uyghur and other Turkic Muslims are being subjected to a genocide by the Government of the People’s Republic of China, the Senate, therefore, recognize that a genocide is currently being carried out by the People’s Republic of China against Uyghurs and other Turkic Muslims, call upon the International Olympic Committee to move the 2022 Olympic Games if the Chinese government continues this genocide and call on the government to officially adopt this position; and

That a message be sent to the House of Commons to acquaint that house with the above.

No. 80.

By the Honourable Senator Miville-Dechêne:

March 15, 2021—That the Senate call upon the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship to grant citizenship to Raif Badawi by exercising his discretion under section 5 of the Citizenship Act, which authorizes him to grant citizenship to any person to alleviate cases of special and unusual hardship.

No. 81.

By the Honourable Senator Massicotte:

March 17, 2021—That the Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources be authorized to examine and report on emerging issues related to its mandate:

(a) The current state and future direction of production, distribution, consumption, trade, security and sustainability of Canada’s energy resources;

(b) Environmental challenges facing Canada including responses to global climate change, air pollution, biodiversity and ecological integrity;

(c) Sustainable development and management of renewable and non-renewable natural resources including but not limited to water, minerals, soils, flora and fauna; and

(d) Canada’s international treaty obligations affecting energy, the environment and natural resources and their influence on Canada’s economic and social development; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than December 30, 2022, and that the committee retain all powers necessary to publicize its findings until 180 days after the tabling of the final report.

No. 83.

By the Honourable Senator Bernard:

March 30, 2021—That the Senate recognize:

(a)that the British Parliament abolished slavery in the British Empire as of August 1, 1834;

(b)that slavery existed in British North America prior to its abolition in 1834;

(c)that abolitionists and others who struggled against slavery, including those who arrived in Upper and Lower Canada by the Underground Railroad, have historically celebrated August 1 as Emancipation Day;

(d)that the Government of Canada announced on January 30, 2018, that it would officially recognize the United Nations International Decade for People of African Descent to highlight the important contributions that people of African descent have made to Canadian society, and to provide a platform for confronting anti-Black racism; and

(e)the heritage of Canada’s people of African descent and the contributions they have made and continue to make to Canada; and

That, in the opinion of the Senate, the government should designate August 1 of every year as “Emancipation Day” in Canada.

No. 85.

By the Honourable Senator Forest-Niesing:

April 20, 2021—That the Senate:

1.express its concern about the closure at Laurentian University in Sudbury, of 58 undergraduate programs and 11 graduate programs, including 28 French-language programs, representing 58% of its French-language programs, and the dismissal of 110 professors, nearly half of whom are French speaking;

2.reiterate its solidarity with the Franco-Ontarian community;

3.recall the essential role of higher education in French for the vitality of the Franco-Canadian and Acadian communities and the responsibility to defend and promote linguistic rights, as expressed in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Official Languages Act; and

4.urge the government of Canada to take all necessary steps, in accordance with its jurisdiction, to ensure the vitality and development of official language minority communities.

No. 86.

By the Honourable Senator Omidvar:

May 5, 2021—That the Senate of Canada call on the Government of Canada to match Canadians’ donations to support India in its battle against the COVID-19 pandemic.


Inquiries

No. 3. (five)

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 30, 2020—That he will call the attention of the Senate to the rising mental health challenges being faced by Canadian farmers.

No. 4. (five)

By the Honourable Senator Dalphond:

September 30, 2020—That he will call the attention of the Senate to the use of parliamentary privilege in the context of employee relations and inquiries of the Senate Ethics Officer.

No. 6. (four)

By the Honourable Senator McPhedran:

October 1, 2020—That she will call the attention of the Senate to parliamentary privilege, the Ethics and Conflict of Interest Code for Senators and options for increasing accountability, transparency and fairness in the context of the Senate’s unique self-governance.

No. 8. (one)

By the Honourable Senator Jaffer:

November 3, 2020—That she will call the attention of the Senate to the twentieth anniversary of the adoption of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 on women, peace and security.

No. 11. (one)

By the Honourable Senator Sinclair:

November 19, 2020—That he will call the attention of the Senate to realizing Canada’s Council of Elders.

No. 13.

By the Honourable Senator Moodie:

December 8, 2020—That she will call the attention of the Senate to childcare in Canada and its impact on children, women, families and the economy.

No. 14.

By the Honourable Senator Simons:

December 14, 2020—That she will call the attention of the Senate to the pandemic-related fiscal crisis facing NAV CANADA and its impact on levels of air traffic control and public safety services at regional airports across Canada.

No. 15.

By the Honourable Senator Duncan:

February 16, 2021—That she will call the attention of the Senate to the career of former senator the Honourable Murray Sinclair.

No. 16.

By the Honourable Senator Harder, P.C.:

March 15, 2021—That he will call the attention of the Senate to the role and mandate of the RCMP, the skills and capabilities required for it to fulfil its role and mandate, and how it should be organized and resourced in the 21st century.


Written Questions

No. 1.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding 24 Sussex Drive:

In May 2016, Mélanie Joly, then Minister of Canadian Heritage, said a plan to renovate 24 Sussex was forthcoming. Four years later, could the Government answer the following questions:

1.What is the timeline for delivering a plan?

2.Which departments and agencies are working on the plan?

3.How much has been spent to date on developing a plan?

4.Are all options, including tearing down the building, being considered?

No. 3.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding government appointments:

1.Currently, how many vacancies are there in Governor in Council (GIC) appointed positions?

2.Currently, what is the percentage of vacancies compared to the total number of GIC positions?

3.The Auditor General’s 2019 special examination of the Standards Council of Canada released in July 2020 stated: “There were 13 positions on the Governing Council, including 10 for members appointed by the Governor in Council. At the end of August 2018, 4 positions were vacant (1 since June 2017), and 3 positions were held by members after their terms had expired. The Audit Committee and the Corporate Governance Committee were at risk of losing quorum because of these vacancies. As permitted by the Financial Administration Act, members with expired terms agreed to continue their duties on the Governing Council until they were reappointed or replaced. The Governor in Council appoints members to these vacant and expired positions on the recommendation of the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development. Therefore, these appointments were outside of the Corporation’s control. Despite the Governing Council’s proactive approach to communicating its needs to the Minister, there was a risk that 7 of the 13 positions on the Governing Council could become vacant.”

(a)While the Standards Council agreed with the Auditor General’s recommendation to continue to engage the Minister on the need for timely appointments, what was the Minister’s response to this recommendation?

(b)Why did the Minister fail to recommend timely appointments to the Governing Council?

4.The Auditor General’s 2019 special examination of the Canadian Commercial Corporation released in July 2020 stated: “The Corporation is governed by a Board of Directors, which consists of the Chairperson and nine directors. The Governor in Council appoints the Chairperson, while the Minister of International Trade Diversification appoints the nine directors with the approval of the Governor in Council. The Governor in Council also appoints the Corporation’s President and Chief Executive Officer. At the start of the period covered by the audit, all nine director positions had expired. By the end of the period, the Minister had appointed six directors, including three who were reappointed to their positions.”

(a)Why did the Minister fail to make timely appointments to the Board of Directors?

(b)As the position of President is currently vacant, how is the government ensuring a timely appointment to fill this position?

No. 7.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding the Black Entrepreneurship Program announced on September 9, 2020:

1.What are the eligibility criteria for the National Ecosystem Fund? How were the criteria developed? Were consultations involved in developing the criteria, and if so, with which groups/individuals?

2.If the eligibility criteria for the National Ecosystem Fund has not yet been determined, when is it expected to be in place?

3.Which partner organizations will work with Canada’s Regional Development Agencies to deliver the National Ecosystem Fund? How and when were they selected?

4.Who will determine the eligibility of applications to the National Ecosystem Fund?

5.What is the timeline for the development and delivery of the National Ecosystem Fund? When will the funding be distributed?

6.What are the eligibility criteria for the Black Entrepreneurship Loan Fund? How were the criteria developed? Were consultations involved, and if so, with which groups/individuals? Who will determine the eligibility of applications?

7.If the eligibility criteria for the Black Entrepreneurship Loan Fund has not yet been determined, when is it expected to be in place?

8.What is the timeline for the development and delivery of the Black Entrepreneurship Loan Fund? When will the funding be distributed?

9.The Black Entrepreneurship Program announcement also mentioned the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) and the Canada Emergency Business Account (CEBA). A survey of its members by the Black Business and Professional Association in Spring 2020 found that 80% of respondents couldn’t be helped by the CEWS and four out of five Black businesses didn’t believe they would qualify for the CEBA. Does the Government of Canada know how many Black businesses received the CEWS and the CEBA? If not, does the government have an estimate? How did the Government of Canada promote/advertise these programs with Black business associations? Were the views of Black businesses and business associations sought or taken into account when making changes to these programs?

No. 8.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Concerning Global Affairs Canada’s Private Sector Investment Champions Speaker’s Program:

In 2019, Mr. Kyle Kemper, brother of Prime Minister Trudeau, was awarded a $12,430 grant from the Government of Canada. The grant was to attend a conference in Switzerland on Blockchain technology. Mr. Kemper was quoted in the Globe and Mail as saying it was his extensive work in the field that led to his invitation to speak at the conference: “That’s my expertise and I’d love to talk to you all about how blockchain can radically transform Canada and bring about a golden age.” However, Mr. Kemper’s presentation, which was entitled Think Canada seemed decidedly out of place at a conference where the rest of the presentations were of the character of the one entitled: “The Importance of Multi-Signature, Time-Locked Bitcoin Transactions in Custody Solutions.”

Mr. Kemper was selected as part of Global Affairs Canada’s Private Sector Investment Champions Speaker’s Program (PSICSP). That program is run by the Trade Commissioner and involves identifying and recruiting senior executives from the private sector to be champion speakers at events organized by Embassies, High Commissions and Consulates in priority markets to promote Canada as an investment destination of choice.

1.Was the Canadian Embassy in Switzerland the organizer of the Crypto Valley Blockchain Technology Conference in Zug, Switzerland that Mr. Kemper spoke at on June 24, 2019? If not, why did he qualify for a PSICSP grant of $12,430 to participate in what was clearly a technical/scientific conference?

2.The Private Sector Investment Champions Initiative (PSICI), which the Champion Speaker’s Program is a part of, was created to attract foreign investment in key sectors in Canada, such as the satellite and telecommunications industry. When was blockchain identified as a key sector for foreign direct investment in Canada? Can you please provide the documentation that can substantiate this?

3.One of the management tools for the PSICI is a champions database. Could the government please provide the 2019 database that included champions for the blockchain sector in Canada?

4.The Champions Initiative includes regular training consisting of an orientation and coaching program for Champions to familiarize themselves with government policies and investment trends. On what dates did Mr. Kemper participate in orientation and coaching programs prior to his participation in the June 2019 conference?

5.How many Champions Speaking events took place in 2019, who were the champions speakers at each of them? What events/venues did they speak at, and what were the individual costs for each of those champion speakers that were covered by the PSICSP?

6.Where did the idea to have Mr. Kemper speak at the Crypto Valley Conference come from? Did it originate with the organizers of the conference? Did it originate with Global Affairs Canada? Or did it originate from Mr. Kemper? Was there PMO involvement? How did this all come about?

7.Besides Mr. Kemper, how many Champions has Global Affairs Canada engaged in the blockchain sector?

8.In the Crypto Valley Conference program, Mr. Kemper is identified as representing the Canadian Blockchain Association, however he was no longer the Executive Director of that Association. Why wasn’t Ms. Tanya Woods, the Executive Director of the Association, selected as the Champion Speaker for the Crypto Valley Conference? Were other experts considered, and if so, who were they?

9.Champions are paid nominal honoraria. What was the amount of honoraria that Mr. Kemper was paid?

10.Champions are expected to generate investment prospects. What investment prospects did Mr. Kemper generate as a result of his participation in the Crypto Valley Conference, and what is the value to Canada of those investments he generated?

11.Did Mr. Kemper participate in any other sector specific events either prior to or after the Crypto Valley conference, and if not why not?

12.In a recent video available on You Tube, Mr. Kemper is asked about the last protest he attended. His response is: “My life seems to be a constant protest against central banking.” In another video interview he argues that modern communication and the internet have made representative democracy as we know it obsolete. Given these statements, why was Mr. Kemper chosen by the government to represent Canada at an international conference to drum up foreign direct investment in this country?

No. 11.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding registered charities:

1.Have any registered charities had their charitable status revoked since October 2019? If so, how many, and why is this information not contained in the Canada Revenue Agency’s (CRA) online database as of September 2020?

2.Have any registered charities been sanctioned with a financial penalty from CRA since October 2019? If so, how many, and why is this information not contained in CRA’s online database as of September 2020?

3.Have any registered charities had their charitable status suspended since October 2019? If so, how many, and why is this information not contained in CRA’s online database as of September 2020?

4.How many CRA staff currently work on the auditing of registered charities? Since October 2019, how many of these staff have been made surplus, and how many have been moved to other CRA divisions? If staff have been moved to other CRA divisions, when did this occur, and why?

5.Have audits of registered charities continued to be conducted since October 2019? If so, how many audits are currently underway? Were any of these audits suspended or cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic?

No. 12.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding app-based voting in the House of Commons:

1.How much money has been spent to date on the development of a smartphone app for voting by Members of Parliament in the House of Commons?

2.Since July 6, 2020, have any outside contracts been awarded in relation to the development or implementation of a smartphone app for voting by Members of Parliament in the House of Commons? If so, who received these contracts, and what is the total amount awarded? When were the contracts awarded, and what are their duration?

3.What has been the involvement of the Communications Security Establishment in the development and testing of this app? How many CSE personnel have been assigned to work on this project?

4.How does this app ensure the authentication of the Member voting? Is this verification biometrics-based, such as facial recognition or fingerprint?

No. 13.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding the COVID Alert app:

1.How many times has the Government of Canada’s COVID Alert app been downloaded to date?

2.How many active users are there currently of the COVID Alert app?

3.What is the estimated percentage of all active phones which have downloaded this app?

4.What is estimated percentage of phones capable of downloading this app which have done so to date?

5.Is the number of people applying updates to the COVID Alert app tracked? If so, how many people have updated the app to the latest version?

6.How many exposure notifications have been sent to date?

7.How many people have entered one-time keys into the app after confirming their COVID-19 diagnosis?

8.How much has been spent to date on advertising to promote the use of the COVID Alert app, and what forms of advertising have been used?

9.Did the Government of Canada ask Bell, Telus, Rogers or any other carrier to send text messages inviting their customers to download the app? Were these messages bilingual? Did the Government of Canada ask carriers to ensure the text messages were bilingual?

No. 14.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding government consultations:

1.Which business groups and organizations did the Department of Finance or any other department consult with respect to each of the government’s new emergency programs in response to COVID-19? What form did these consultations take, and what process was followed?

2.What specific advice was accepted by the government, and why? What advice was rejected, and why?

3.Did the Department of Finance or any other government department consult with the Canadian Federation of Independent Business prior to the government’s two announcements on the wage subsidy program for small business, on March 18 and March 27, 2020, respectively? If yes, what form did that consultation take? If not, why not?

No. 15.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding flights in Canada containing COVID-positive passengers:

1.To date, how many flights in Canada have contained at least one passenger who tested positive for COVID-19?

2.How many of these flights were domestic, and how many were international?

3.How many passengers who tested positive for COVID-19 were arriving or in transit from international destinations?

4.Have public health authorities been able to contact all impacted fellow passengers to inform them of the positive case on their flight?

No. 16.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding COVID-19 vaccinations:

1.Has Health Canada or the Public Health Agency of Canada developed a protocol surrounding the order in which different groups in the Canadian population will receive a COVID-19 vaccination, when it becomes available? If so, what is it?

2.Are any other federal government departments or agencies involved in the decision-making surrounding the distribution amongst our population of a COVID-19 vaccine(s)? If so, which ones?

3.Are provincial health authorities responsible for developing such a protocol in their own jurisdictions, or will the distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine follow national rules or guidelines?

4.The Public Health Agency of Canada’s guidance document Canadian Pandemic Influenza Preparedness: Planning Guidance for the Health Sector was last updated in August 2018. Is it being updated? If so, when will the update be released, and will it be specific to the COVID-19 pandemic?

No. 19.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding the Defence Capabilities Blueprint:

The mandate letter of the Minister of National Defence instructs the Minister to: “Ensure the Canadian Armed Forces have the capabilities and equipment required to uphold their responsibilities through continued implementation of Strong, Secure, Engaged, including new procurements and planned funding increases”. Under Strong, Secure, Engaged, the Defence Capabilities Blueprint (DCB) contains general project timelines for approximately 240 major capital information technology and infrastructure projects, and significant in-service support contracts.

1.Can the Minister explain how these projects are prioritized?

2.Can the Minister please provide timelines for initiating the request for proposal (RFP), letting a contract and completing delivery for each of these 240 projects?

3.Can the Minister identify the government’s twenty most important capability projects within the DCB, and the current timelines (initiating the RFP, letting a contract and completing delivery) for completing priority projects?

4.How many of the 240 major projects are currently funded?

No. 20.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding Defence Procurement Canada:

The mandate letter for the Minister of National Defence instructs the Minister to: “Support the Minister of Public Services and Procurement to bring forward analyses and options for the creation of Defence Procurement Canada, to ensure that Canada’s biggest and most complex National Defence and Canadian Coast Guard procurement projects are delivered on time and with greater transparency to Parliament. This priority is to be developed concurrently with ongoing procurement projects and existing timelines”.

1.Can the Minister provide the currently envisaged timeline and key milestones for bringing forward “analyses and options for the creation of Defence Procurement Canada”?

2.Since December 2019, how many meetings has the Minister held with the Minister of Public Services and Procurement specifically concerning this matter?

No. 21.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding Global Affairs Canada:

Could the government please list all Canadian diplomats who currently receive a remuneration higher than the official pay scale, and provide the position and salary range of these individuals?

No. 22.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—With respect to the Department of National Defence:

The mandate letter for the Minister of National Defence instructs the Minister to: “Continue to improve support for the women and men of the Canadian Armed Forces and to ensure a workplace characterized by professionalism, inclusion and valuing diversity: Work with senior leaders of the Canadian Armed Forces to establish and maintain a workplace free from harassment and discrimination; Create a new $2,500 tax-free benefit every time a military family relocates, to help with retraining, recertification and other costs of finding new work; and Achieve the goal of 25 per cent of Canadian Armed Forces members being women by 2026”.

1.Can the Minister please outline the status of each of the components of this initiative?

2.What is the current percentage of women in the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) at present? What are the targets for each year up to 2026?

3.Within the 25% overall target, have sub-targets been set for the employment of women in the various elements of the CAF, including the combat arms? What are those targets?

4.What measures are being taken to ensure that targets are being met on an annual basis?

5.Have training or operational standards, or practices, in any element of the CAF been adjusted in any way to facilitate meeting the set targets? If so, please explain the specific nature of the adjustments that have been made?

6.Could the Minister please outline each of the recruitment objectives for every designated group? What is the current level of designated group membership in the CAF at the present time? What are the targets for each year up to 2026?

7.How are the various designated group recruitment objectives balanced against urgent operational recruiting needs in the CAF that may arise?

8.When an urgent operational recruiting requirement related to a particular trade arises (for instance with respect to pilots in the RCAF), does such a requirement ever take any form of precedence, even temporarily, over designated group objectives?

9.What are the current manning requirements for each frigate in the RCN, each submarine and each MCDV? To what extent are these requirements being met?

10.How many RCN frigates, submarines and MCDVs are currently manned up to the full requirement?

11.What is the current authorized strength level for each CF-18, Aurora and Cyclone squadron in RCAF in terms of numbers of operational aircraft, pilots and personnel? How many CF-18, Aurora and Cyclone squadrons in the RCAF are currently manned up to their full requirement?

12.What is the current authorized strength level for each Regular Force armoured, infantry and artillery regiment/battalion in the Canadian Army? How many of these units are currently manned up to their full requirement?

No. 23.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding classified or protected documents:

1.Across the Government of Canada, from January 1, 2020 to date, how many documents have been handled or stored in a manner which did not meet the requirements of the document’s security level?

2.Which government departments or agencies have seen the most incidents of improperly handled or stored documents in 2020?

3.Have any security clearances been revoked in 2020 in relation to the treatment of these documents? If so, how many?

4.What guidance regarding the treatment of documents has been given to public servants working from home due to the COVID-19 pandemic?

5.How do government agencies and departments conduct security checks to monitor the proper handling of documents remotely?

6.Have any “Protected C”, “Confidential”, “Secret”, and “Top Secret” documents been worked on from home during the COVID-19 pandemic? If so, how many, and from which departments or agencies?

No. 25.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding fighter aircrafts:

The mandate letter of the Minister of National Defence instructs the Minister to: “Work with the Minister of Public Services and Procurement to manage the competitive process to select a supplier and enter into a contract to construct Canada’s fighter aircraft fleet”.

1.Can the Minister please explain how this process is being managed on a day-to-day basis?

2.Since December 2019, how many meetings has the Minister held with the Minister of Public Services and Procurement specifically concerning this project?

3.Can the Minister confirm that the plan is to sign a contract for a new fighter aircraft in 2022? Can the Minister outline the key milestones over the next two years in order to meet that objective?

4.Can the Minister confirm that all aircraft manufacturers, including Boeing, Saab and Lockheed Martin, are participating in this competitive process?

5.What is the currently estimated date of delivery for the first new fighter aircraft? What is the currently estimated date for the first front-line squadron to be operational? What is currently estimated date of delivery of the final aircraft?

6.Can the Minister confirm that it remains the intent of the Government of Canada to procure 88 new fighter aircraft in total?

No. 27.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding the residences situated at Harrington Lake:

1.When was the “Caretaker’s House”, originally built in 1850, moved and renamed the “Farmhouse”?

2.Was the Prime Minister, the Prime Minister’s Office and/or the Privy Council Office involved in the decision to move the Caretaker’s House?

3.What are the detailed costs of moving the Caretaker’s House and renovating the Farmhouse?

4.What is the budget for renovating the main cottage?

5.What is the timeline to complete the renovations?

No. 29.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding immigration removals:

1.Report 1 of the Spring 2020 Auditor General’s report states: “In April 2019, we determined that there were about 50,000 individuals with enforceable removal orders. Two thirds of these — 34,700 cases in the wanted inventory — involved individuals whose whereabouts were unknown.” What is being done to determine the whereabouts of these 34,700 missing individuals?

2.As of September 2020, how many individuals were there with enforceable removal orders? How many of these are individuals whose whereabouts are unknown? How many of these involve individuals with criminality? How many have criminal convictions in Canada? How many have served sentences in provincial prisons? How many have served federal sentences? How many were released from correctional institutions with deportation orders whose whereabouts are now unknown?

3.The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) stopped carrying out immigration removals in March 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. When does CBSA intend to resume removals? Does it anticipate doing so in the current calendar year?

4.What is the Government of Canada doing to improve the data quality issues across the immigration removals system, as identified in the Auditor General’s report? How has the COVID-19 pandemic impacted CBSA’s plans during the current fiscal year to improve the input of information to support removals, through systems upgrades and additional training measures?

5.What is CBSA’s target for removals for the 2020-21 fiscal year? Has the target been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic?

No. 32.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding interprovincial trade:

1.What is the current annual cost to the Canadian economy of interprovincial trade barriers, in both dollar figures and as a percentage of GDP?

2.What are the concrete measures taken by the Government of Canada since 2016 to improve internal trade within the country?

3.Can the government identify specific barriers to trade between provinces that have been taken down within the last year?

4.Has the Government of Canada implemented any recommendations from the 2016 report Tear Down These Walls: Dismantling Canada’s Internal Trade Barriers from the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce? If so, which recommendations? If not, why not?

5.Which provinces allow interprovincial alcohol shipments under amendments to the Importation of Intoxicating Liquor Act in 2012 and 2014?

6.The Canadian Free Trade Agreement’s Regulatory and Reconciliation Cooperation Table had planned to complete work in 11 areas by the end of 2020. What is the current status of each of the identified areas below? If the work has been delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, has a new timetable been set for each area?

Occupational Health and Safety

(a)Workplace First Aid Training

(b)Fall Protection

(c)Occupational Exposure Limits

Transportation

(d)Size and Weight Restrictions (Except Spring Weight Restrictions)

(e)Electronic Logging Devices

(f)Truck Driver Certification — Mandatory Entry-Level Training (MELT) for Commercial Drivers

(g)Autonomous Vehicles Testing

Agriculture / Agri-Food / Aquaculture

(h)Food Inspection

(i)Meat Inspection

Registration Requirements

(j)Workers’ Compensation Board

Technical Safety

(k)Gasfitter/Gas Technician Licensing/Certification

No. 33.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding the Large Employer Emergency Financing Facility (LEEFF):

1.How many companies and industry associations have contacted Minister’s offices and/or departments identifying problems with/requesting changes to the LEEFF? In particular, how many have contacted the following Ministers and/or their offices/departments since the LEEFF was launched?

(a)Prime Minister

(b)Deputy Prime Minister

(c)Minister of Finance

(d)Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry

(e)Minister of Transport

(f)Minister of Natural Resources

2.Could the government break down the number of companies and industry associations which contacted the Government of Canada regarding changes to the LEEF by each economic sector listed below?

(a)Aerospace

(b)Airlines

(c)Manufacturing

(d)Oil and Gas

(e)Retail

(f)Tourism/Hospitality

3.How many applications under the LEEFF program have been received since May 20, 2020?

4.How many applications under the LEEFF program have been approved since May 20, 2020?

No. 34.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding long-term care facilities for people with disabilities:

During Committee of the Whole in the Senate on May 1, 2020, Minister Carla Qualtrough was asked if she knew how many facilities for people with disabilities across Canada have experienced COVID-19 outbreaks, and if this is something the Minister was tracking. The Minister responded: “In terms of tracking, unfortunately, no, I couldn’t tell you with any certainty. I could tell you anecdotally, but there is no rigour attached to the numbers I would give you. I have heard some horrible stories.”

1.Has any Government of Canada department or agency tracked the number of outbreaks of COVID-19 in long-term care facilities for people with disabilities across Canada? If so, how many have occurred, in total and by province?

2.How many COVID-19 cases are tied to outbreaks at long-term care facilities for people with disabilities, amongst staff and/or residents, in total and by province?

3.Which government department or agency is responsible for tracking these outbreaks? Is that information communicated to Employment and Social Development Canada?

No. 39.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding defence capabilities in Canada’s North:

The mandate letter for the Minister of National Defence instructs the Minister to: “Work with the Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Minister of Northern Affairs and partners through the Arctic and Northern Policy Framework to develop better surveillance (including by renewing the North Warning System), defence and rapid-response capabilities in the North and in the maritime and air approaches to Canada, to strengthen continental defence, protect Canada’s rights and sovereignty and demonstrate international leadership with respect to the navigation of Arctic waters”.

1.Since December 2019, how many meetings has the Minister of National Defence held with the Ministers concerned on this matter?

2.What is the Government’s current timeline for renewing the North Warning System?

3.Have discussions been initiated with the United States on this matter?

4.What level of funding has been set aside by the Government of Canada to renew the North Warning System?

5.What does the Government assess as the most important military capabilities that will require renewal in: a) the next five years, b) the next ten years, and c) the next twenty years to ensure “better surveillance, defence and rapid-response capabilities in the North and in the maritime and air approaches to Canada”?

6.Please provide the currently envisaged timeline for each project that will be required to renew “surveillance and defence” capabilities in the North and in the maritime and air approaches to Canada, a description of each project and the level of funding set aside for that project.

7.Please provide the currently envisaged timeline for each project that will be required to renew “rapid-response” capabilities in the North and in the maritime and air approaches to Canada, a description of each project and the level of funding set aside for that project.

No. 40.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding government contracts:

In Spring 2019, the Privy Council Office gave two sole-sourced contracts to WE Charity.

Government contract reference number C-2018-2019-Q4-00145, from March 19th to March 31st, was for $17,050.34. The information in the government’s contracts database states that it was for “Other professional services not elsewhere specified” and “Honoraria”.

Government contract reference number C-2019-2020-Q1-00011 for “management consulting” was worth $24,996.00, just a few dollars under the threshold to advertise the contract for tendering. The contract ran from May 1st to May 3rd, 2019 and some of the only information about this contract in the database states: “conference/workshop services”.

1.Could the government please provide the following information on these two contracts:

(a)Who authorized these contracts?

(b)What were these contracts for?

(c)What work was provided?

(d)What was the location where the work was provided?

(e)Who received the money?

(f)Why were these contracts sole sourced instead of tendered?

2.With respect to PCO contract C-2018-2019-Q4-00145, no individual’s name was attached to this contract, as is the case with other “Honoraria” contracts in the government’s database. Why?

No. 41.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding the Privy Council Office (PCO):

In January 2016, Mr. Matthew Mendelsohn was appointed Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet (Results and Delivery) in the Privy Council Office. On March 4, 2020, the Prime Minister announced Mr. Mendelsohn had stepped down from his position.

1.What was Mr. Mendelsohn’s salary or salary range?

2.Did Mr. Mendelsohn receive severance pay or any amount after leaving his position?

3.Who replaced Mr. Mendelsohn as Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet (Results and Delivery)?

4.How many PCO employees were assigned to Results and Delivery between January 2016 and March 2020?

5.What results were delivered by the Results and Delivery section of the Privy Council Office between January 2016 and March 2020?

No. 42.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding the Privy Council Office (PCO):

1.When did PCO’s Security Operations Division begin its investigation of the leak to former CBC journalist James Cudmore of Cabinet deliberations and decisions regarding the interim supply ships? When did PCO’s Security Operations Division end this investigation?

2.Were any outside investigators hired to assist in this PCO probe? If so, how many, and at what cost?

3.How many individuals were interviewed during the course of this investigation? Could a list of their names be provided?

4.Was a final report submitted from PCO’s Security Operations Division regarding this investigation? If so, when, and who received it? Did PCO’s Security Operations Division recommend asking the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) to investigate the leak?

5.On what date was the RCMP asked to investigate the leak? How was the request made, and who made the request?

6.How many investigations into leaks from Cabinet or any other government leaks have been conducted by PCO’s Security Operations Division since 2016?

(a)Was it asked to investigate the leak surrounding the judicial selection process of the 2017 Supreme Court appointment?

(b)Was it asked to investigate the leak of Statistics Canada’s labour force survey for April 2020?

No. 43.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding human rights:

1.Did the Prime Minister raise China’s crackdown on human rights in Hong Kong during any of his telephone calls with over 40 world leaders in the run up to the United Nations Security Council seat vote? If so, which world leaders did the Prime Minister speak with about this issue?

2.Did the Prime Minister raise China’s unlawful detention of Canadians Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor during any of his telephone calls with over 40 world leaders in the run up to the United Nations Security Council seat vote? If so, which world leaders did the Prime Minister speak with about this issue?

3.Did the Prime Minister raise China’s treatment of the Uyghurs during any of his telephone calls with over 40 world leaders in the run up to the United Nations Security Council seat vote? If so, which world leaders did the Prime Minister speak with about this issue?

4.Did the Prime Minister raise LGBTQ2 rights during any of his telephone calls with over 40 world leaders in the run up to the United Nations Security Council seat vote? If so, which world leaders did the Prime Minister speak with about this issue?

5.Did the Prime Minister raise gender equality during any of his telephone calls with over 40 world leaders in the run up to the United Nations Security Council seat vote? If so, which world leaders did the Prime Minister speak with about this issue?

6.The Prime Minister has said: “The tragic violence that Indigenous women and girls have experienced (in Canada) amounts to genocide”. Was this issue raised during any of the Prime Minister’s telephone calls with over 40 world leaders in the run up to the United Nations Security Council seat vote? If so, which world leaders did the Prime Minister speak with about this issue?

7.The Prime Minister has said: “Systemic racism is an issue right across the country, in all our institutions, including in all our police forces, including in the RCMP”. Was this issue raised during any of the Prime Minister’s telephone calls with over 40 world leaders in the run up to the United Nations Security Council seat vote? If so, which world leaders did the Prime Minister speak with about this issue?

No. 44.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding political fundraising:

1.How many political fundraising events in total have been attended by Cabinet Ministers since May 31, 2017?

2.Could the government list the number of political fundraising events attended by each Cabinet Minister since May 31, 2017, including former Ministers no longer serving in Cabinet?

No. 45.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding the delivery of government programs:

1.Since 2016, how many programs worth $543 million or more have been delivered by departments or agencies of the Government of Canada?

2.Since 2016, how many Government of Canada programs have been run by outside administrators? Of these, how many of Government of Canada programs worth $543 million or more have been run by outside administrators?

3.Since 2016, how many Government of Canada programs were administered under a sole-source contract and did not go to tender? Of these, how many of Government of Canada programs worth $543 million or more were administered under a sole-source contract and did not go to tender?

No. 49.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding the Canada–United States Safe Third Country Agreement:

On April 22, 2020, the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) revealed that refugee claimants eligible for exemptions under the Canada–United States Safe Third Country Agreement can enter Canada through designated land ports of entry.

1.How many claimants have applied for asylum in Canada since this directive was announced?

2.Have all claimants who have entered Canada since April 22 been tested for COVID-19? If so, how many have tested positive?

3.Why did the Government of Canada issue this directive, given that the Canadian border is closed and claimants at irregular border crossings are being returned to the United States?

4.Why did CBSA communicate information regarding this change from its French Twitter account only?

No. 51.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments:

On March 9, 2020, Order in Council 2020-0120 re-appointed “Vianne Timmons, O.C., of Regina, Saskatchewan, as a special adviser to the Prime Minister, to serve as an ad hoc provincial member of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments, to hold office during pleasure for a term ending on April 30, 2020.”

1.Why did the government re-appoint Dr. Timmons as a Saskatchewan member of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments when the Board of Regents of Memorial University of Newfoundland announced in December 2019 that Dr. Timmons would become its president and vice-chancellor, effective April 1, 2020?

2.Are provincial members of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments required to be residents of the province they represent? If not, why not? How many other provincial members of the Advisory Board are not residents of the province they represent?

3.According to the government’s Senate appointments website, applications are only supposed to be retained for two years. Have there been instances where a list older than two years has been used to fill a Senate seat for any province? If so, how many? When was the last list for the province of Saskatchewan submitted?

No. 52.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding shipbuilding:

The mandate letter of the Minister of National Defence instructs the Minister to: “Work with the Minister of Public Services and Procurement on the renewal of the Royal Canadian Navy Fleet, continuing the revitalization of the shipbuilding industry, creating middle class jobs and ensuring Canada’s Navy has the modern ships that it needs”.

1.Can the Minister please explain how this process is being managed on a day-to-day basis?

2.Since December 2019, how many meetings has the Minister held with the Minister of Public Services and Procurement specifically concerning the National Shipbuilding Strategy?

3.Can the Minister please confirm:

(a)The planned in-service dates for the two Joint Support ships under construction?

(b)The planned in-service dates for each of the six Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships?

(c)The planned date (year and month) for the start of construction of the future Canadian Surface Combatant?

No. 57.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding the processing of disability benefits at Veterans Affairs Canada:

1.What is the current backlog in processing applications for disability benefits from Veterans? How many applications in the backlog are completed applications, and how many are incomplete applications?

2.Since March 15, 2020, have any applications for disability benefits been flagged for suspected fraud or abuse? If so, how many, and were those applications subject to further investigation?

3.How does Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) explain why Canada Emergency Response Benefit payments were automatically approved even when fraud is suspected, while applications for disability benefits for our Veterans remain backlogged by the tens of thousands?

4.How many claims have been placed on hold as a result of the inability of Veterans to access supporting documentation due to the COVID-19 pandemic?

5.Due to the closure to the public of in-person Service Canada offices, did the VAC call centre see an increase in call volume? If so, by how much?

(a)A 2019 report from the Office of the Auditor General found that the VAC call centre allowed all callers to speak with an agent — is that still the case?

(b)Is the average wait time for a caller still five minutes, as was reported by the Auditor General? If not, what is it? What percentage of calls are answered within the department’s timeliness target of two minutes?

6.In a September 2018 report, the Veterans Ombudsman found that francophone applicants waited longer for decisions than anglophone applicants, and women waited longer than men. What are the current wait times for each of these groups?

No. 59.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 23, 2020—Regarding ventilators:

1.As of September 24, 2020, how many ventilators are available for use in Canada?

2.How many ventilators are expected to be available for use in Canada as of December 31, 2020?

3.How many ventilators have been ordered by the Government of Canada since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic? How many have been delivered to date? How many contracts have been finalized with suppliers/manufacturers? What is the name of each supplier/manufacturer, and the cost of each contract? Are timelines for delivery built in to these contracts?

4.Are any of the ventilators ordered this year intended to replenish the National Emergency Strategic Stockpile? If so, how many?

No. 62.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

September 30, 2020—Regarding possible overseas tax evasion and the “Paradise Papers”, a 2017 leak of information from the law firm Appleby and the corporate registries of 19 tax jurisdictions, as of September 30, 2020:

1. How many Canadians (individuals, trusts, foundations and companies) have been identified by the Canada Revenue Agency as a result of this leak?

2. How much money has been identified as owing to the Government of Canada?

3. How many Canadians (individuals, trusts, foundations and companies) have been determined to owe money to the Government of Canada?

4. What are the names of the individuals, companies, trusts and foundations determined to owe money to the Government of Canada?

5. How many Canadians (individuals, trusts, foundations and companies) have been charged with overseas tax evasion?

6. What are the names of the individuals, companies, trusts and foundations charged?

7. In which court and in which cities were these charges laid?

8. How many were convicted?

9. Of those convictions:

(a) What was the largest fine, and what was the smallest?

(b) What was the longest term of imprisonment, and what was the shortest?

10. How much money identified as owing has been collected by the Canada Revenue Agency?

No. 63.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

September 30, 2020—With respect to a report in the Toronto Star on May 30th 2019, about tax evasion in the real estate markets of Ontario and British Columbia, and claims that “Canada Revenue Agency audits have added more than $1 billion to government coffers”, would the Government of Canada provide the following information:

1. How many Canadians (individuals or companies/corporations) have been identified as having evaded taxes through real estate transactions?

2. How many non-Canadians (individuals or companies/corporations) have been identified as having evaded taxes through real estate transactions?

3. Of those Canadians (individuals or companies/corporations) identified, how many of them are being, or have been reviewed by the Canada Revenue Agency?

4. Of those non-Canadians (individuals or companies/corporations) identified, how many of them are being, or have been reviewed by the Canada Revenue Agency?

5. How many audits have been undertaken against these Canadians by the Canada Revenue Agency?

(a) How many reassessments or related compliance actions have been undertaken?

6. How many audits have been closed?

7. How many audits are still ongoing?

8. How many audits have been undertaken against these non-Canadians by the Canada Revenue Agency?

(a) How many reassessments or related compliance actions have been undertaken?

9. How many audits have been closed?

10. How many audits are still ongoing?

11. How many identified Canadians have availed themselves of the Voluntary Disclosure Program with the Canada Revenue Agency?

12. How many identified non-Canadians have availed themselves of the Voluntary Disclosure Program with the Canada Revenue Agency?

13. How many identified Canadians have settled with the Canada Revenue Agency?

14. How many identified non-Canadians have settled with the Canada Revenue Agency?

15. How much money, including unpaid taxes, fines, etc., has the Canada Revenue Agency assessed as a result of investigating these cases, broken down by the following categories:

(a) in unpaid taxes;

(b) in interest;

(c) in fines; and

(d) in penalties?

16. How much of the money has been collected?

17. How many of these cases are under appeal?

18. How many cases remain open?

19. How many of the cases have been closed, i.e. the full amount of taxes, interest, fines and penalties have been collected?

20. How many tax evasion charges have been laid?

21. How many convictions have been recorded?

No. 64.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

September 30, 2020—With respect to overseas tax evasion:

On April 3rd, 2016 the Panama Papers were disclosed, including the names of more than 600 Canadians. On May 9th of that same year the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) gained access to the external Panama Papers database. Subsequently, the CRA committed to “combatting the abusive use of offshore jurisdictions and protecting the integrity of the Canadian tax system” and would “pursue audits related to offshore tax evasion including some Canadian clients” named in the Panama Papers.

However, more than four years later, the CRA seems not to have shared in the success that other national revenue agencies have achieved. According to the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists — the organization that broke the Panama Papers story — in the three and a half years since the release of the Papers, many countries have worked swiftly and forcefully to act on the information discovered.

Other countries have recovered:

Germany: $183 million

Spain: $164 million

Ecuador: $84 million

Australia: $93 million

Mexico: $22 million

Malta: $11 million

Lithuania: $358,830

Iceland: $25 million

Numerous individuals charged and convicted worldwide.

And over $1.2 billion collected. Not “identified”, collected.

During this same time, Canada, according to the same source, has recovered no money whatsoever.

Also, unlike in other countries, not a single Canadian had been convicted, or even charged with tax evasion as a result of the Panama Papers.

After more than four years, can the Canada Revenue Agency join other countries in pointing to any real progress resulting from the release of the Panama Papers?

Any at all?

With that in mind, would the Government of Canada provide the following:

1.How many Canadians (individuals, trusts, foundations and companies) have been identified in the Panama Papers?

2.Of those Canadians (individuals, trusts, foundations and companies) identified, how many of their accounts are being, or have been reviewed by the Canada Revenue Agency since the release of the Panama Papers?

3.How many audits have been undertaken against these Canadians by the Canada Revenue Agency?

(a)How many reassessments or related compliance actions have been undertaken?

4.How many audits have been closed?

5.How many audits are still ongoing?

6.How many identified Canadians have requested that their cases be dealt with under the auspices of the Voluntary Disclosure Program with the Canada Revenue Agency?

7.How many of those requests have been granted

8.How many identified Canadians have settled with the Canada Revenue Agency?

9.How much money, including unpaid taxes, fines, etc., has the Canada Revenue Agency assessed as a result of investigating these cases?

10.How much money identified as owing has been collected by the Canada Revenue Agency?

11.How many cases remain open?

12.How many of the audits have been completed, including the full amount of taxes, interest, fines and penalties having been collected?

13.How many tax evasion charges have been laid?

No. 65.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

September 30, 2020—With respect to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA):

Regarding the commitment in the 2016 Federal Budget to spend $444.4 million (over five years) to combat tax evasion, and the commitment in the 2017 Federal Budget to spend $523.9 million (over five years) for the same purpose, for a combined total $968.3 million, of as well as the claim by the CRA that “The CRA remains on track to spend the budget investments over the 5-year period for which they have been outlined”:

1.As of the end of Fiscal Year 2016-2017, how much of the $41.8 million (from the $968.3 million total) budgeted for “Cracking down on Tax Evasion and Combatting Tax Avoidance” for that Fiscal Year in Budget 2016 had actually been spent;

How much of the money spent from the $41.8 million budgeted was used to fund employee benefit plans?

2.As of the end of Fiscal Year 2017-2018 how much of the $62.8 million (from the $968.3 million total) budgeted for “Cracking down on Tax Evasion and Combatting Tax Avoidance” for that Fiscal Year in Budget 2016 had actually been spent;

How much of the money spent from the $62.8 million budgeted was used to fund employee benefit plans?

3.As of the end of Fiscal Year 2017-2018 how much of the $54.9 million (from the $968.3 million total) budgeted for “Cracking down on Tax Evasion and Combatting Tax Avoidance” for that Fiscal Year in Budget 2017 had actually been spent;

How much of the money spent from the $54.9 million budgeted was used to fund employee benefit plans?

4.As of the end of Fiscal Year 2018-2019 how much of the $85.7 million (from the $968.3 million total) budgeted for “Cracking down on Tax Evasion and Combatting Tax Avoidance” for that Fiscal Year in Budget 2016 had actually been spent;

How much of the money spent from the $85.7 budgeted was used to fund employee benefit plans?

5.As of the end of Fiscal Year 2018-2019 how much of the $78.1 million (from the $968.3 million total) budgeted for “Cracking down on Tax Evasion and Combatting Tax Avoidance” for that Fiscal Year in Budget 2017 had actually been spent;

How much of the money spent from the $78.1 million budget was used to fund employee benefit plans?

6.As of the end of Fiscal Year 2019-2020 how much of the $98.6 million (from the $968.3 million total) budgeted for “Cracking down on Tax Evasion and Combatting Tax Avoidance” for that Fiscal Year in Budget 2016 had actually been spent;

How much of the money spent from the $98.6 million budget was used to fund employee benefit plans?

7.As of the end of Fiscal Year 2019-2020 how much of the $77.6 million (from the $968.3 million total) budgeted for “Cracking down on Tax Evasion and Combatting Tax Avoidance” for that Fiscal Year in Budget 2017 had actually been spent;

How much of the money spent from the $77.6 million budget was used to fund employee benefit plans?

No. 66.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

September 30, 2020—Regarding the Canada Child Benefit for the benefit years 2016-17, 2017-18, 2018-19 and 2019-20:

1.How much money was provided via the Canada Child Benefit per federal electoral district in Prince Edward Island?

2.How many families in Prince Edward Island received the Canada Child Benefit?

3.How many children in Prince Edward Island were covered by the Canada Child Benefit?

4.What was the largest monthly payment for a Prince Edward Island family receiving the Canada Child Benefit?

5.What was the smallest monthly payment for a Prince Edward Island family receiving the Canada Child Benefit?

6.What percentage of recipients of the Canada Child Benefit in Prince Edward Island had adjusted net family annual income:

(a)Under $30,000

(b)Between $30,000 and $49,999

(c)Between $50,000 and $79,999

(d)Over $80,000

7.What was the average adjusted net family income for those Prince Edward Islanders receiving the Canada Child Benefit?

No. 67.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

September 30, 2020—Since 2005, qualified medically released Canadian Forces veterans have been eligible for priority employment appointments in the federal public service.

For the period from January 1, 2005, to September 30, 2020:

1.How many people were hired by the federal public service?

2.How many casual employees were hired by the federal public service?

3.How many term employees were hired by the federal public service?

4.How many indeterminate employees were hired by the federal public service?

5.How many members of the Canadian Forces, by rank upon release, have been medically released?

6.How many of these qualified medically released members, by rank upon release, have applied for a priority employment appointment in the federal public service?

(a)How many of these were hired as casual employees?

(b)How many of these were hired as term employees?

(c)How many of these were hired as indeterminate employees?

7.How many, by rank upon release, were still on the priority employment appointment list when their eligibility period expired?

8.How many qualified medically released Canadian Forces veterans, by rank upon release, were hired by each federal Government department?

(a)How many of these were hired as casual employees by each federal Government department?

(b)How many of these were hired as term employees by each federal Government department?

(c)How many of these were hired as indeterminate employees by each federal Government department?

No. 70.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

September 30, 2020—As stated in the Public Accounts of Canada 2018-2019:

Ministerial approval represents authority given to Ministers under the Financial Administration Act (FAA) or other Acts of Parliament as follows:

Section 25(1) of the FAA gives Ministers, through Treasury Board regulations, general authority to approve the write-off of any debt, obligation or claim other than accountable advances or overpayments of salaries, wages, or employment-related allowances that would not result in a charge to an appropriation.

Section 155.1(4) of the FAA gives Ministers, through Treasury Board regulations, authority to waive interest on overdue amounts owing to Her Majesty and to waive administrative charges for dishonoured instruments (e.g. NSF cheques) imposed under section 155.1 of the FAA.

Other Acts of Parliament (e.g. Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act) give Ministers general authority to approve the write-off or forgiveness of specific debts, obligations or claims.

Under this authority, the Minister of National Revenue wrote off, forgave or waived interest or administrative charges in 1,534,315 cases of “debts, obligations and claims” to the Government of Canada in Fiscal Year 2018-2019, for a total of $4,166,405,553.

These include:

1,190,147 cases under the Financial Administration Act, totaling $3,237,650,407;

25,303 cases under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act, totaling $352,032,596;

7,637 cases under the Excise Tax Act, totaling $98,070,653; and

311,228 cases under the Income Tax Act, totaling $478,651,897.

With this in mind, regarding the Financial Administration Act and the Income Tax Act, would the Government of Canada provide the following information for the Fiscal Year 2018-2019:

1.How many Canadians (individuals, trusts, foundations and companies) have had their debts written off?

2.What was the largest amount written off?

3.What was the smallest amount written off?

4.What was the largest amount forgiven?

5.What was the smallest amount forgiven?

6.How many Canadians (individuals, trusts, foundations and companies) have had interest and/or administrative charges waived?

7.What was the largest amount of interest or administrative charges waived?

8.What was the smallest amount of interest or administrative charges waived?

9.What was the Minister of National Revenue’s justification for writing off or forgiving those debts, and waiving interest and administrative charges?

10.Is the Canada Revenue Agency still actively trying to recover the debts owed but written off?

11.If so, what steps are being taken?

12.If not, why not?

13.How much of this debt has been recovered?

No. 71.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

September 30, 2020—Regarding the Canada Revenue Agency:

In a Monday, May 11th 2020 appearance before the House of Commons Committee on Government Operations and Estimates, Ted Gallivan, Assistant Commissioner of International, Large Business and Investigations for the Canada Revenue Agency made a number of statements regarding the Agency’s work to combat overseas tax evasion.

With that in mind, could the government provide the following information:

1.Mr. Gallivan stated that $4.4 billion is the “gross amount” of money identified as being owed to the Government of Canada. Of that amount:

(a)how much has actually been recovered,

(b)how much of that is related to overseas tax evasion,

(c)how many Canadians (individuals, trusts, foundations and companies) comprise that $4.4 billion,

(d)how many Canadians have been charged with tax evasion, and

(e)how many Canadians have been convicted of tax evasion?

2.Mr. Gallivan also stated that this amount is “many years ahead of schedule”. What, then, is the Canada Revenue Agency’s “schedule” for recovering this money?

3.Mr. Gallivan also referred to “over 3,000 cases” currently before the courts. Of that amount:

(a)how many Canadians (individuals, trusts, foundations and companies) are represented in that number,

(b)how many of those cases relate to overseas tax evasion,

(c)what is the largest amount of taxes alleged to have been evaded,

(d)what is the smallest amount,

(e)what is the average amount, and

(f)how many years do these cases go back?

No. 75.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

October 2, 2020—Regarding the National Research Council:

1.What is the total cost to Canadian taxpayers as a result of the failed vaccine development partnership between the National Research Council and CanSino Biologics Inc?

2.Did any Government of Canada entities provide security warnings or risk assessments to the National Research Council regarding its partnership with CanSino Biologics Inc., either before the agreement was initially reached, during the partnership, or after the deal ended?

(a)If so, which department or agency relayed these assessments or warnings, and when?

(b)If so, what was the substance and content of that assessment or warning?

3.Did the Department of Foreign Affairs, or any Canadian diplomatic mission in the People’s Republic of China, provide any advice or assessment regarding the partnership of the National Research Council with CanSino Biologics Inc., either before the agreement was initially reached, during the partnership, or after the deal ended?

(a)If so, when was this assessment provided?

(b)If so, what was the substance and content of that assessment?

No. 78.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

October 27, 2020—Regarding the 5G security review:

1.According to public statements made by former Minister Ralph Goodale, the current government has been conducting a review of whether to allow Huawei to join Canada’s 5G network since at least September 2018. On what date did the 5G security review formally begin?

2.Which departments, agencies or other entities of the Government of Canada have been involved in this review since 2018?

3.How many full-time equivalents have been assigned to this review since it began?

4.How much funding has been allocated to this review since it began?

5.When is the review expected to be completed?

6.Have any preliminary reports or findings on this matter been provided to any government Minister? If so, on which date, and in which department or agency?

7.Will a final report be submitted? If so, who will receive it, and will it be publicly available, in whole or in part?

No. 81.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

October 27, 2020—Regarding the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF):

A May 25, 2018, CBC report quoted the Minister of National Defence’s office as saying: “In line with the government of Canada’s objective of raising the numbers of Forces personnel, there are currently initial discussions to review the possibility for foreign nationals’ recruitment beyond skills applicants.”

1.Has the Government of Canada completed a review of the citizenship requirement for CAF personnel? If so, when did the review begin and when was the review completed? If not, when is the review expected to be completed?

2.What programs does the CAF have today permitting non-citizens to join? Where do these programs rank relative to other CAF recruitment objectives? For example, how are recruits from such programs prioritized relative to other CAF recruiting objectives?

3.What additionally is being reviewed in the way of expanding non-citizen recruitment?

4.Since its creation in 2014, how many foreign nationals have applied for Canadian citizenship under the fast track process for permanent residents serving in the CAF and foreign military members on exchange with the CAF? What countries have the applicants come from? How many of these applicants have become citizens?

No. 83.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

October 27, 2020—Regarding harassment complaints across the Government of Canada:

1.How many workplace harassment complaints were lodged across Government of Canada departments, agencies, or other entities in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and to date in 2020?

2.How many of these complaints completed all five steps in the harassment complaint process in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and to date in 2020 (acknowledging receipt, reviewing the complaint, exploring options, rendering a decision and notifying in writing, and restoring the well-being of the workplace)?

3.Which departments, agencies, or other entities were among the top five across the Government of Canada for harassment complaints lodged in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and to date in 2020?

4.Across the Government of Canada, how many cases of assault subject to the Criminal Code, including sexual assault and criminal harassment, were referred to the appropriate authorities in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and to date in 2020?

5.How much was paid out in settlements across Government of Canada departments, agencies or other entities in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, and to date in 2020?

6.How many individuals received these settlements in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and to date in 2020?

No. 84.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

October 27, 2020—Regarding high-speed internet:

1.Since November 2015, which departments, agencies, tribunals or other Government of Canada entities have advertised employment opportunities that required access to high-speed internet as part of the job’s conditions of employment? Which ones have done so in the past 12 months?

2.How many positions in total have been advertised with this requirement since November 2015? How many of these were advertised in the past 12 months?

3.How many Canadians does the Government of Canada estimate are unable to apply for these positions due to their inability to access high-speed internet?

No. 85.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

October 27, 2020—Regarding litigation:

1.How many legal claims currently pending involve the Government of Canada?

2.How many of these current legal claims name the Government of Canada as the defendant or respondent?

3.What is the potential liability of all current statements of claim against the Government of Canada?

4.For the fiscal year 2019-2020, how much did the Department of Justice pay external law firms and other legal agents? How many law firms and agents received these funds, and what were the top ten recipients?

5.How much has been spent so far on external law firms and other legal agents in the current fiscal year?

No. 86.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

October 27, 2020—Regarding Canada’s military justice system:

1.The Spring 2018 report of the Auditor General of Canada found that delays in resolving military justice cases contributed to 10 cases being dismissed or not proceeding to court martial. How many cases have been dismissed under similar circumstances since the release of the Auditor General’s report in May 2018?

2.The Auditor General found the average time to complete a court martial case was 17.7 months after charges were laid. What is the current average time to complete a court martial case after charges are laid?

3.When did the Justice Administration and Information Management System (JAIMS) become operational? How has the implementation of JAIMS reduced delays in the military justice system?

4.When did the Military Justice System Performance Monitoring Framework become operational? How has the implementation of this framework reduced delays in the military justice system?

5.Military justice system time standards were published in response to the Auditor General’s Spring 2018 report. What percentage of cases meet the time standards for each of the 31 identified phases of the military justice system?

No. 87.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

October 27, 2020—Regarding Veterans:

1.What is the total cost to the Government of Canada related to court cases, including legal costs (actual and notional costs) and settlements, involving Canadian Veterans since November 2015?

2.What is the current number of legal claims involving the Government of Canada and Veterans? What is the potential liability to the Government of Canada of these current cases?

No. 90.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 3, 2020—Regarding government advertising:

1.Since April 2018, how much have Government of Canada departments and agencies spent on Facebook and Instagram advertising, promotions, and sponsored posts and videos?

2.How is this spending broken down by government department and agency?

3.How much has Government of Canada departments and agencies spent on Facebook and Instagram advertising, promotions, and sponsored posts and videos specifically related to the COVID-19 pandemic?

4.How much has the Government of Canada collected in GST from Facebook and Instagram ads on these platforms since 2019?

No. 93.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 1, 2020—Regarding Veterans Affairs Canada:

In December 2017, Public Services and Procurement Canada awarded a contract worth over $10 million on behalf of Veterans Affairs Canada to Agilec for the delivery of the department’s Career Transition Services program. Shortly after the Agilec contract was publicly revealed, it was reported that previous administrator of the program (the charity Canada Company) had 7,000 former and serving military personnel registered and was actively helping 1,500 of these individuals find jobs.

1.How many former and serving military personnel were registered with Agilec in 2018, 2019 and to date in 2020?

2.How many of these individuals did Agilec actively help find jobs in 2018, 2019, and to date in 2020?

No. 94.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 1, 2020—Regarding the Government of Canada’s COVID-19 emergency response programs:

1.How much has been spent to date by each government department or agency on external consultants in relation to its COVID-19 emergency response programs?

2.For related contracts in each department or agency, please provide:

(a)The name of the recipient firm or individual of a related contract

(b)The amount of the contract(s)

(c)The date the contract began and ended, and

(d)A summary of the work provided under the contract.

No. 96.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 1, 2020—Regarding the Canada Revenue Agency:

In April 2018, the CBC reported that tax reassessment rates across Canada’s North were several times higher than the national average. Reassessment rates between 2014 and 2016 were 12 to 15% in Nunavut, 11 to 14% in Yukon, and 13 to 16% in the Northwest Territories, while the national reassessment rate was about 4.6% for the same time period.

What were the tax reassessment rates in Nunavut, Yukon and the Northwest Territories in 2017, 2018, and 2019?

No. 101.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 1, 2020—With respect to special ministerial exemptions granted under COVID-19 quarantine rules, please provide a list of all exemptions granted since March 10, 2020, including:

1.The total number of exemptions granted;

2.The individual to whom an exemption was granted;

3.The dates on which exemptions were granted;

4.The name of the Minister who granted the exemption;

5.The location in which the individual receiving the exemption entered Canada;

6.The reasons for each exemption that has been granted;

7.The proposed activities that the individual granted an exemption planned to engage in;

8.Whether any restrictions were placed by the Minister or their department on such activities in the context of the exemption granted; and

9.The nature of follow-up under taken by the Minister or their department to ensure conditions were adhered to.

No. 102.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 1, 2020—Regarding the public service;

In 2018, changes to the rules surrounding performance pay for Governor-in-Council (GIC) appointees stated any performance pay and associated compensation could be clawed back if the appointee is found to have committed serious breaches of conduct or mismanagement in their annual performance review, or “willfully or recklessly” sought to hide or misrepresent their achievements such that any deficiencies would have been difficult to detect at the time of review.

1.Since 2018, how much performance pay and associated compensation has been recouped by the Government of Canada as a result of this policy change in the Performance Management Program?

2.How is the amount recouped broken down by the following categories?

(a)Performance Pay

(b)Bonuses

(c)In-range Increases

(d)Re-calculation of Pension Entitlements

3.From how many GIC appointees was this pay recouped?

4.How many GIC appointees received ratings of “did not meet” for performance reviews in 2016-17, 2017-18, 2018-19, and 2019-20?

5.What is the process for determining if a GIC appointee has willfully or recklessly sought to hide or misrepresent their achievements such that any deficiencies would have been difficult to detect at the time of the performance evaluation? How many of these processes have taken place to date?

No. 103.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 1, 2020—Regarding government spending:

An answer to a question on the House of Commons Order Paper tabled on November 16, 2020, found $2,778,152.26 was spent between March 1, 2020 and September 23, 2020 by the Government of Canada on plexiglass, cough and sneeze guards, protection partitions, and custom glass (for health protection) to prepare government offices for safe re-opening in response to COVID-19.

Could the government provide a break down of how each of these items were procured? Were these items sole-sourced, or were the respective procurement processes competitive?

No. 105.

By the Honourable Senator Pate:

December 2, 2020—The government has characterized Bill C-7 as a response to the Quebec Superior Court’s Truchon decision. Please provide a detailed list of other government legislation that has proposed amendments to the Criminal Code in response to one trial decision, in one province or territory, striking down a provision of the Criminal Code on Charter grounds.

No. 106.

By the Honourable Senator Pate:

December 2, 2020—In response to Bill C-7, disability groups and individuals with disabilities have asked the question, “why us?”. Bill C-7 singles out people with disabilities to be exempted from the legislative protection that the government has described as an important safeguard in Bill C-14, the reasonable foreseeability of natural death requirement. If the government is now recharacterizing the reasonable foreseeability of natural death requirement as a barrier, rather than a safeguard, why does this recharacterization only apply to people with disabilities and, particularly in light of the Fraser decision, what is the government’s basis for believing that this is not inherently discriminatory under section 15 of the Charter?

No. 107.

By the Honourable Senator Pate:

December 2, 2020—Before the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs, Neil Belanger of the BC Aboriginal Network on Disability Society testified that “Racism toward Indigenous People permeates through our health care system, and it would be dangerously naive to suggest that MAID would be exempt from this system failure and to suggest that Indigenous persons living with disabilities would be adequately protected without the end-of-life criteria under MAID.” Please provide detailed lists both of First Nations, Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve Indigenous individuals, organizations and communities that were consulted in regard to Bill C-7; and, disaggregated specific issues and all concerns about Bill C-7 raised by Indigenous Peoples.

No. 108.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 8, 2020—Regarding cybersecurity and Information Technology (IT):

On January 23, 2020, the Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry announced the Government of Canada would give $49 million to Mastercard for cybersecurity.

1.In addition to Mastercard, which private foreign companies have received Government of Canada funding since October 2016 in relation to cybersecurity?

2.How much funding in total has been provided to private foreign companies since October 2016 in relation to cybersecurity?

3.How much funding in total has been provided to private domestic companies since October 2016 in relation to cybersecurity?

4.A briefing note for the Prime Minister prepared after the 2019 federal election and released through Access to Information revealed that the IT systems across the federal government are old, outdated and in need of a major overhaul. In particular, the briefing note stated that computer systems at Employment and Social Development Canada (EDSC) are “facing rust-out and critical failure.”

(a)How much has been spent to upgrade EDSC’s computer systems since October 2019?

(b)Why wasn’t the $49 million given to Mastercard provided to EDSC instead?

5.How much has been spent across the Government of Canada in the current fiscal year to upgrade and/or replace IT systems?

6.According to Shared Services Canada, on March 3, 2020, the email system went down across Infrastructure Canada, Treasury Board, Public Services and Procurement Canada, and Natural Resources Canada. How many government departments have had their email systems go down so far in 2020? Which departments, and how many times were they down?

No. 109.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 8, 2020—Regarding the Department of National Defence (DND):

In March 2020, it was estimated that infrastructure maintenance and repair work at National Defence has been underspent by almost $250 million since 2015-16.

1.Does DND concur that their backlog in infrastructure repairs is about $250 million? If not, what is the current estimate for the backlog?

2.What proportion of real property, which DND is obligated to maintain, is actually in operational use by the department? Has National Defence made such an assessment?

3.A 2016 internal audit found that electrical outages, sewer backups, and other disruptions could threaten operations and the health and safety of the men and women of our Armed Forces. How has DND worked to address the issues raised in that audit?

4.In October 2013, the previous Conservative government launched Defence Renewal, a strategy to find efficiencies that would be reinvested back into Defence. In 2015, the Liberal election platform promised to make defence transformation a priority, but that was never reflected in mandate letters for the Minister of National Defence. To what extent were the following objectives met, as originally set in the Defence Renewal Initiative?

(a)To reinvest $750 million to $1,200 million in higher priority initiatives annually by 2017-18.

(b)To internally re-prioritize between 2,800 and 4,800 military and civilian personnel on higher value work, either within a given organization, or elsewhere within Defence.

(c)To “rationalize the real property portfolio to be efficient, effective, operationally relevant, affordable, and sustainable and to support the roles and missions of the Canadian Armed Forces”.

No. 110.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 8, 2020—Regarding homelessness amongst Canada’s Veterans:

1.How many Canadian Veterans does Veterans Affairs Canada currently estimate are homeless in our country? How did the department determine this estimate?

2.What impact has the COVID-19 pandemic had on the number of homeless Veterans across Canada, and the support they can access from Veterans Affairs Canada?

3.Has Veterans Affairs Canada considered a housing voucher or stipend for Veterans, either through the National Housing Strategy or another mechanism? Is any estimated cost attached to this consideration? If so, what is it?

No. 112.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 8, 2020—Regarding judicial appointments:

1.Budget 2017 contained $55 million over five years, and $15.5 million per year thereafter, to create 28 new federally appointed judicial positions. How many of these positions have been created to date? Where are they located?

2.Budget 2018 contained $77.2 million over four years to support the expansion of unified family courts, beginning in 2019-2020, to create 39 new judicial positions in Alberta, Ontario, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland and Labrador. How many of these positions have been created to date? Where are they located?

3.Budget 2018 contained $17.1 million over five years for seven judicial positions in Saskatchewan and Ontario. How many of these positions have been created to date? Where are they located?

No. 113.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 8, 2020—Regarding the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN):

In 2019, the RCN’s fleet of submarines spent a total of zero days at sea, due to repairs, maintenance, and work on long-term upgrades.

1.In May, the Department of National Defence confirmed that maintenance work required before the submarine fleet could be deployed was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Has this work since resumed? If so, when?

2.How many days has the RCN submarine fleet collectively spent at sea so far in 2020? Which submarines are currently planned to be active at sea during the next 12 months?

3.When was the most recent date that any submarine of the fleet was at sea?

No. 116.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 16, 2020—Regarding Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC):

1.How many Veterans currently receive reimbursement for child care expenses from VAC?

2.What are the eligibility criteria for receiving these reimbursements? When did the criteria come into force? Has it been recently changed?

3.How many Veterans have had their child care reimbursements revoked by VAC in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, and to date in 2020?

4.What are the most common reasons for VAC revoking the reimbursement of child care expenses?

5.What is the process for revoking these benefits?

No. 117.

By the Honourable Senator Pate:

February 8, 2021—When the pandemic hit, young people “aging out” of child welfare systems—already 200 times more likely than their peers to experience homelessness—faced extreme financial and personal difficulties, with no family—and the government in that role—to help them. Black, Indigenous, racialized, LGBTQ2S youth and youth with disabilities faced particular challenges.

Like so many disability and income support recipients, young people, many of whom were advised by the Canada Revenue Agency to apply for Canada Emergency Response Benefit even if they were unsure of their eligibility, are now being told they will have to repay amounts received under the CERB.

These young people face untenable survival decisions about being homeless and hungry in order to making CERB repayments. Many have also, as a result of receiving CERB, lost all or part of student assistance, social assistance or disability supports they would otherwise receive.

The Canada Revenue Agency has said that collection efforts will not happen until “it is responsible to do so.” The Prime Minister has said, regarding this situation, that “people who received money that they needed, or made good-faith mistakes about the application, should not worry about it.” While this certainly sounds hopeful, what will the government actually do? Will they implement a CERB repayment amnesty? And if not, why not?

No. 118.

By the Honourable Senator Pate:

February 8, 2021—When youth are taken into the care of child welfare agencies the government becomes their parent. When they age out of care, most are literally dumped without the kinds of supports most people enjoy from their parents. For many, CERB payments were the first time they knew for certain they would be able to afford food and housing, or catch up on payment of hydro and other bills.

The Prime Minister has announced that a plan is in the works for assistance for this group and others who are vulnerable. Is the government considering measures like national standards around guaranteed livable basic income as they prepare this plan?

No. 119.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 8, 2021—Regarding the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB):

1.To date, how many “educational” letters has the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) sent to CERB recipients regarding their eligibility for the benefit?

2.Have any of these letters been sent by CRA in 2021? If so, how many?

3.What is the breakdown by province and territory of the recipients of these letters?

4.A statement issued from the CRA said: “Individuals who have received this letter should not interpret it as a determination that they have definitively been deemed ineligible for the CERB; what the letter means is that the CRA does not yet have the information needed to confirm that they are in fact eligible for the benefit.” How many recipients of these letters has the CRA since confirmed were ineligible for the CERB? How many were confirmed as eligible?

No. 120.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 8, 2021—Regarding Correctional Service of Canada (CSC):

1.What was the approval process for the decision to vaccinate inmates in federal penitentiaries in early January 2021, during the first phase of COVID-19 immunizations in Canada?

2.When was this decision made?

3.Who authorized the decision?

4.Which groups or individuals were consulted in relation to this decision? What form did this consultation take? When did it begin?

5.What consultations took place with the Union of Canadian Correctional Officers?

6.Why did CSC decide to exclude correctional officers from this decision?

7.What was the total number of doses provided to CSC in the first phase of COVID-19 vaccinations?

8.What was the decision-making process at the Public Health Agency of Canada that led to this specific number of doses being assigned to CSC?

9.Were any other institutions, organizations or groups considered by the Public Health Agency of Canada for the allocation of the doses assigned to CSC in the first phase of vaccinations? If so, which ones, and what was the rationale for assigning that dose allotment to CSC?

10.How did CSC determine which inmates to vaccinate during the first phase of COVID-19 immunizations?

11.How many doses have been used to vaccinate inmates in federal penitentiaries to date?

No. 121.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 8, 2021—Regarding seizures of fentanyl by Canadian law enforcement:

1.What quantity of fentanyl was seized by Canadian law enforcement authorities in 2020?

2.What is the estimated street value of the amount seized?

3.How does the quantity of fentanyl seized in 2020 break down by country of origin?

4.What was the average concentration of samples of seized fentanyl analysed by Health Canada in 2020? What was the highest concentration found?

5.What is the country of origin of the most highly concentrated seized fentanyl analysed by Health Canada in 2020?

No. 123.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 8, 2021—Regarding the Supreme Court of Canada’s R. v. Jordan decision of July 2016:

1.How many criminal cases were stayed in 2020 due to the timelines set out in the Jordan decision, broken down by province and territory?

2.How many applications to have criminal cases dismissed under Jordan timelines are currently pending in each province and territory?

3.Does the Department of Justice track the number of criminal cases in each province and territory that are in danger of being stayed due to the timelines set out in the Jordan decision? If so, how many cases in each province and territory are approaching the 18-month time limit? How many are approaching the 30-month time limit?

No. 124.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 8, 2021—Regarding Global Affairs Canada (GAC):

1.How much did GAC spend in total on Mr. Bill Morneau’s failed bid to become Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development?

2.How many public servants at GAC worked on this campaign on either a full-time or part-time basis? What support did they provide? What is the total amount spent on staffing?

3.What was the total amount spent on hospitality? Were all hospitality costs incurred in Paris? If not, where else were they incurred?

4.Were any travel costs incurred by GAC? If so, how much in total was spent?

5.Were any other Government of Canada departments or agencies involved in Mr. Morneau’s campaign? If so:

(a)What support did they provide?

(b)How many public servants worked on the campaign, either on a full-time or part-time basis?

(c)What was the total amount spent on the campaign by the department or agency?

No. 125.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 8, 2021—Regarding N95 face masks/respirators:

1.According to Public Services and Procurement Canada, as of October 15, 2020, the Government of Canada had signed contracts worth $655,060,121.24 with 23 companies for the purchase of N95 masks.

(a)Is this information still accurate? If not, what is the most recent information?

(b)How many N95 masks do these contracts represent?

(c)How many N95 masks have been received to date?

2.How many N95 masks purchased by the Government of Canada since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic were produced in Canada? How many were produced internationally?

3.How many N95 or KN95 masks purchased by the Government of Canada have since been rejected for failing to meet federal standards? Were these masks returned to their country of origin or disposed of in Canada? If they were disposed of in Canada, how did that occur? How much has been spent in total on rejected N95 or KN95 masks, and from how many companies?

4.It has been reported that in 2019, the Government of Canada threw out at least two million expired N95 masks from the National Emergency Strategic Stockpile warehouse in Saskatchewan. Two other warehouses were also reportedly closed.

(a)How many expired N95 masks were thrown out in total when these three warehouses were shuttered?

(b)Were more than three warehouses closed? If so, how many, and how many N95 masks were thrown away as a result?

(c)Has the National Emergency Strategic Stockpile since been replenished with N95 masks? If so, how many N95 masks have been replenished, and how were they procured? If not, is there a timetable for when the Government of Canada intends to replenish the stockpile with N95 masks?

5.Have any autoclaves or other medical devices to sterilize and re-use N95 masks been approved by Health Canada? If so, how many? Are any such devices currently being evaluated by Health Canada? How widely are any such approved devices in use?

No. 126.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 8, 2021—Regarding the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC):

1.How many infants in Canada were hospitalized for neonatal abstinence syndrome in 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020? How are these numbers broken down by province and territory?

2.What percentage does this represent out of the total number of infants born in 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020?

3.Does PHAC track physical or mental development issues with infants hospitalized for neonatal abstinence syndrome? If so, what has this research shown since 2017?

No. 127.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 8, 2021—Regarding the National Capital Commission:

1.Since October 2, 2017, how much has the National Capital Commission spent on renovations at Rideau Hall carried out at the request of former Governor General Julie Payette and/or her office? What is the breakdown of these renovation projects and their costs?

2.Were these renovation projects completed by January 21, 2021, when the former Governor General resigned? If not, how many were not concluded, and what is their current status?

3.How many nights did the former Governor General spend at Rideau Hall during her tenure?

No. 129.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 8, 2021—Regarding COVID-19 vaccines:

1.On what date did the Government of Canada begin negotiations with each of the following companies regarding the purchase of their COVID-19 vaccine candidates? Which Minister was the lead in negotiations at the time?

(a)Pfizer

(b)Moderna

(c)AstraZeneca

(d)Medicago

(e)Johnson & Johnson

(f)Novavax

(g)Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline

2.Do the contracts negotiated with the companies identified above specify the number of vaccine doses per vial or per tray? If so, what number of doses per vial or per tray are specified in each contract?

3.Do the contracts negotiated with the companies identified above lay out a delivery schedule by week, by month, or by quarter? If so, what type of delivery schedule is specified in each contract?

4.Do the contracts negotiated with the companies identified above identify where the vaccine would be produced, either by country or manufacturing facility? If so, what location(s) is specified in each contract?

5.Did each company identified above provide the Government of Canada with information on how many customers had placed orders before Canada, or Canada’s placement in a queue to receive vaccines once available and approved? If so, what did each company tell the Government of Canada?

6.For each company identified above, does the contract specify the use of low dead space syringes to minimize vaccine wastage? How many low dead space syringes does the Government of Canada estimate will be needed for COVID-19 vaccine distribution amongst Canadians? How many have been ordered to date? Have they been delivered?

7.Will the Government of Canada publicly release the details of the contracts signed with each of the companies identified above, in whole or in part, as has been done elsewhere? Why has this not been done so already?

8.Did the Government of Canada ever engage with the United States regarding participation in Operation Warp Speed? Did the United States ever approach Canada regarding participation in Operation Warp Speed? If so, what was the outline and timeline of this engagement?

9.Regarding the Canadian company PnuVax, what is the outline and timeline of the Government of Canada’s engagement with this company since March 2020? What is the Government of Canada’s rationale for not investing in COVID-19 vaccine development with PnuVax?

10.Regarding the Canadian company Providence Therapeutics, what is the outline and timeline of the Government of Canada’s engagement with this company since March 2020? What is the Government of Canada’s rationale for not supporting the proposal submitted by Providence Therapeutics in April 2020 regarding COVID-19 vaccine development?

11.Other than Medicago, PnuVax and Providence Therapeutics, how many other Canadian companies was the Government of Canada engaged with regarding COVID-19 vaccine development? What is the current status of that engagement?

No. 134.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 16, 2021—Regarding the Government of Canada’s approval of the sale of Retirement Concepts to Anbang Insurance Group (through its Canadian subsidiary Cedar Tree Investments) in February 2017:

1. In January 2017, the New York Times reported that Morgan Stanley chose not to advise Anbang on United States mergers and acquisitions as it could not obtain information from the company to satisfy its “know your client” guidelines.

(a) Did the Government of Canada clarify Anbang’s corporate ownership and structure as part of the Investment Canada Act review process?

(b) If so, how did it make this determination? If not, why was this sale approved?

2. When the sale was approved in February 2017, a statement from the former Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development to the Globe and Mail said: “[It] has agreed to maintain at least the current levels of full-time and part-time employees at facilities operated by Retirement Concepts; ensure a significant ongoing role for Canadians in the business; have the current Canadian operator ... continue to manage the business; not close or re-purpose any of the existing residences; [and] financially support the expansion of the business.”

(a) After the Government of Canada approved this purchase, how did the Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development monitor these commitments, particularly regarding staffing at the facilities?

(b) What were the department’s findings regarding these commitments?

(c) Were these findings communicated to the former Minister? If so, when?

3. After the Chinese government seized control of Anbang Insurance Group in February 2018, a spokesperson for the former Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development told the CBC: “We are aware of Anbang’s situation in China and monitoring closely for any implications on its investments in Canada.”

(a) After Anbang was seized by the Chinese government, how did the department monitor the commitments made at the time of the sale?

(b) What were the department’s findings regarding these commitments?

(c) Were these findings communicated to the former Minister? If so, when?

4. In late 2019 and early 2020, British Columbia public health authorities seized control of four out of 21 Retirement Concepts care homes in the province due to serious allegations of neglect, abuse, understaffing, and mismanagement. In December 2019, a spokesperson for the former Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development told the Globe and Mail “…the federal government would monitor commitments around the number of jobs and facilities.”

(a) During the period when disturbing allegations surfaced and British Columbia seized control of four Retirement Concepts facilities, how did the department monitor the commitments made at the time of the sale?

(b) What were the department’s findings regarding these commitments?

(c) Were these findings communicated to the former Minister? If so, when?

No. 135.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 16, 2021—Regarding mental health:

On May 3, 2020, the Prime Minister announced $240 million to develop, expand, and launch virtual care and mental health tools for Canadians.

1. Which mental health organizations in Canada were consulted prior to this announcement?

2. How much of this $240 million has been expended to date, and how is this broken down?

3. How much of this funding been provided to mental health care organizations across Canada? Which groups received this funding? How were the specific allocations determined?

4. The most recent bi-weekly report on the Government of Canada’s emergency COVID-19 spending dated August 6, 2020, stated: “Work on virtual care is proceeding with ongoing discussions with PTs.” Have agreements on virtual care since been reached with all provinces and territories? If not, which provinces and territories have reached agreements with the federal government?

5. How had the government promoted the Wellness Together Canada portal? How much has spent on advertising to raise its awareness amongst Canadians? Does this funding come from the $240 million?

No. 136.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 16, 2021—Regarding COVID-19 vaccinations and modelling data:

Governments in Canada conducted modelling to determine how many deaths and infections from COVID-19 would result if various lockdown measures weren’t taken in order to justify to Canadians the measures they took. For instance, the Ontario government modelling predicted some 20,000 deaths prior to the second wave if lockdown measure weren’t taken in order to justify that province’s lockdown.

1. Did Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, or any other government department or agency conduct and provide similar modelling for the federal government to deal with various vaccine roll-out scenarios? If not, why not?

2. Has Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, or any other government department or agency conducted modelling on how many deaths from COVID-19 could have been avoided in Canada under different scenarios of the vaccine roll-out; for example, if Canada had a stronger vaccine supply? If so, could it be provided?

3. Has Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, or any other government department or agency conducted modelling on how many COVID-19 infections could have been avoided in Canada under different scenarios of the vaccine roll-out; for example, if Canada had a stronger vaccine supply? If so, could it be provided?

4. Has Health Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, or any other government department or agency conducted modelling on the impact on our economy in Canada under different scenarios of the vaccine roll-out; for example, if Canada had a stronger vaccine supply? If so, could it be provided?

No. 137.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 16, 2021—Regarding Export Development Canada (EDC):

Volume III of the 2018-2019 Public Accounts of Canada shows $196,010,248 written off from Export Development Canada’s Canada Account.

1.How did the government determine it would not be able to recoup this money? How long did it take to make this determination?

2.What was the approval process behind the decision of the Minister of International Trade and the Minister of Finance to authorize writing off this loan in December 2018?

3.Since this loan was written off, has EDC engaged with or in any way funded the corporation in question?

4.Since 2016, how many loans from Export Development Canada’s Canada Account have been written off? What is the total amount written off for each of these loans?

No. 138.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 16, 2021—Regarding newspaper articles written by government departments and agencies:

1.In 2020, how much did the Government of Canada pay to publish news articles written by government employees?

2.Which departments or agencies paid for the distribution of these articles, and how much in total did they spend?

3.In which newspapers did these articles appear?

No. 139.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 16, 2021—Regarding Indigenous Services Canada:

On June 11, 2020, the Government of Canada announced $117 million in emergency support related to the COVID-19 pandemic through the Indigenous Community Business Fund. The most recent report to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance on the emergency spending, dated August 6, 2020, shows an availability of “Shortly” and a status of “Additional details to follow” for this funding.

1. Has this entire $117 million in emergency funding been provided to First Nations, Inuit and Métis community or collectively owned businesses? If not, how much has been provided to date?

2. How many applications have been received for this funding?

3. How many applications have been approved for this funding? What is the breakdown of recipients by province and territory?

No. 140.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 16, 2021—Regarding personal protective equipment (PPE):

It has been reported that two million surgical masks were stolen in Hamilton, Ontario in early July 2020.

1.What is the dollar value of the missing masks?

2.Were the missing masks insured against theft? If so, for how much?

3.Had the missing masks been determined as meeting the federal government’s specification requirements for use by front-line health care workers, or had they been determined to be faulty?

4.What were the arrangements for signing over authority for the masks upon arrival and verifying the identity of who picked them up?

5.It has been reported that the Hamilton Police Service has ended their investigation into the theft of these masks. Why was the investigation dropped? What is being done to recover these masks or find the responsible individuals?

6.Why didn’t the Government of Canada alert the John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport of the theft of the masks?

7.Why didn’t the Government of Canada reveal the theft of these masks to Canadian taxpayers?

8.How many other shipments of PPE purchased by the Government of Canada have gone missing since March 2020?

(a)What do these shipments contain?

(b)What is their dollar value?

(c)What is being done to retrieve them?

9.After this theft occured, how were security arrangements changed to ensure this doesn’t happen again? Can the Government of Canada assure Canadians that secure arrangements are now in place to ensure that medical necessities for fighting the COVID-19 pandemic don’t similarly disappear without the government telling Canadians?

No. 141.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 16, 2021—Regarding witness testimony during the January 2019 pre-trial hearing of Vice-Admiral Mark Norman concerning Access to Information request processing in the Canadian Forces and Department of National Defence:

1. The Canadian Forces National Investigation Service (CFNIS) was asked to investigate this matter. When did this investigation begin and when did it end?

2. How many CFNIS personnel were assigned to this investigation?

3. How many people were interviewed throughout the course of this investigation?

4. Was a report produced at the end of the CFNIS investigation?

(a) If so, who received the report, and when?

(b) What were its conclusions?

(c) When will it be made publicly available?

5. How did the CFNIS arrive at the determination that its investigation did not reveal sufficient evidence to pursue criminal or service offence charges in this matter?

6. Since 2016, how many CFNIS investigations have taken place concerning allegations of hiding documents, using code words to circumvent Access to Information, or the improper processing of Access to Information requests?

7. On February 28, 2020, the Minister of National Defence responded to a letter from the Information Commissioner, laying out his department’s response to her recommendations regarding the processing of Access to Information requests. Can the Department of National Defence confirm that the use of code words is no longer used to evade the release of information under Access to Information?

No. 142.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 16, 2021—Regarding witness testimony during the January 2019 pre-trial hearing of Vice-Admiral Mark Norman concerning Access to Information request processing in the Canadian Forces and Department of National Defence and the failed prosecution of the Vice-Admiral:

1. The Information Commissioner of Canada stated in her July 2020 Special Report to Parliament: “Information also came to my attention during the investigation that, in my view, was evidence of the possible commission of an offence under the Act during the processing of an access request related to Vice-Admiral Norman. Since I do not have the authority to investigate such offences, I disclosed this information to the Attorney General of Canada in February 2019.”

(a) When did the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada forward this matter to the Public Prosecution Service of Canada?

(b) What it the current status of the Public Prosecution Service of Canada investigation?

2. The Department of Justice has previously stated that the legal costs incurred in the failed prosecution of the Vice-Admiral were $1,425,389.68, as of Dec. 9, 2019. Is this number still accurate? If not, what is the updated amount?

No. 143.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 16, 2021—Regarding the 2019 Economic and Fiscal Update:

Page 23 of the 2019 Economic and Fiscal Update, released on December 16, 2019 states: “The Government will also launch the first phase of a comprehensive review of government spending and tax expenditures, to ensure that resources are efficiently allocated to continue to invest in people and keep the economy strong and growing. This review will result in $1.5 billion in annual savings, starting in 2020-21.”

1. Which person, group or department within the Government of Canada was designated as the lead for this comprehensive review?

2. Were any contracts signed with outside consultants in relation to this review? If so, how many? Which departments authorized these contracts? Which consultants received contracts? How were these consultants chosen? How much were the contracts worth?

3. Has this comprehensive review since been abandoned? If so, when was it abandoned? If not, what departments and/or programs have been targeted for the first phase of the review?

4. If this review has not been abandoned, is all types of government spending being reviewed, or just operating spending?

5. If this review has not been abandoned, are tax policies currently under consideration? If so, which ones?

6. If the review has not been abandoned, does the Government of Canada still maintain that it will result in $1.5 billion in annual savings? If this target amount has been revised, what is it?

No. 144.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 16, 2021—Regarding the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA):

1. On April 4, 2017, a Framework for Cooperation between Global Affairs Canada and UNRWA was signed.

(a) How did the Government of Canada monitor the undertakings committed to by UNRWA under this framework?

(b) How did the Government of Canada assess if the $500,000 provided to UNWRA for supporting mainstreamed neutrality activities and new neutrality initiatives met its objectives?

(c) Did the Government of Canada ever raise concerns with UNRWA regarding any of the 10 activities listed in the framework’s annex related to Global Affairs Canada’s enhanced due diligence process and neutrality expectations? If so, what concerns were raised, when were they raised, and how were they addressed?

2. The Framework for Cooperation between Global Affairs Canada and UNRWA states: “Global Affairs Canada is particularly interested in (the) ongoing curriculum review process, which enables UNRWA’s educators to use consistent criteria in analyzing and enriching Host Government textbooks, in order to promote UN values and principles in UNRWA classrooms.” On January 19, 2021, the Minister of International Development spoke with UNRWA’s Commissioner-General regarding “…certain educational materials used last year to support Palestinian refugee children during pandemic-related school closures in the West Bank and Gaza contained references that violated UN values of human rights, tolerance, neutrality and non-discrimination.”

(a) When did the investigation announced by the Minister of International Development on January 22, 2021 begin? If it has ended, when did it end? What were the results of the investigation? What actions were taken as a result of the investigation?

(b) Between April 2017 and January 2021, how did the Government of Canada monitor the neutrality of UNRWA’s curriculum and textbooks, and compliance with Canadian anti-terrorism requirements?

(c) Between April 2017 and January 2021, did the Government of Canada raise concerns with UNRWA regarding the neutrality of its curriculum and textbooks, and compliance with Canadian anti-terrorism requirements? If so, when did this occur, and what were the circumstances?

3. Does the Government of Canada have similar frameworks or agreements with any other agency of the United Nations regarding the neutrality of its operations? If so, which ones?

4. Since 2016, has the Government of Canada ever considered withdrawing funding from UNRWA and instead providing funding to other organizations that support vulnerable Palestinians?

No. 145.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 30, 2021—Regarding Finance Canada:

1.Prior to the announcement of Mr. Dominic Barton as Chair of the Government of Canada’s Advisory Council on Economic Growth in February 2016, did he undergo a vetting process? Did any of the 14 members of the council undergo a vetting process prior to the government’s announcement of the composition of the council in March 2016? If so, who conducted the vetting?

2.Was a security screening conducted for the Chair of the council? Were security screenings conducted for any of the other members of the council? If so, who conducted the security screening? If security screenings were not conducted, why not?

3.Was the Chair required to disclose his involvement with foreign state-owned enterprises prior to being named to the council? Were any of the other members of the council required to disclose their involvement with foreign state-owned entities prior to be named to the council? If not, why not?

4.While council members were paid a salary of $1, their expenses were reimbursed by the Government of Canada. How much was reimbursed by the Government of Canada for each of the council members? What is total amount reimbursed to council members as a whole?

No. 146.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 30, 2021—Regarding the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB):

An answer provided to Order Paper question #114, received on March 17, 2021 stated: “…Canadian companies have directly benefited economically from the AIIB. We are aware of three Canadian firms having signed contracts as part of the AIIB’s corporate procurement since Canada officially joined the AIIB in March 2018. In 2018, Hatch provided consulting services on an AIIB-financed project in Uzbekistan. In 2019, Edmonton-based Insignia Software Corporation provided library management system services to the institution. In 2020, EQ Consulting Inc. was awarded two separate contracts by the AIIB for the implementation of market risk tools and order management systems support.”

1.How many jobs were created in Canada through Hatch providing consulting services on an AIIB-financed project in Uzbekistan? How many of these were middle-class jobs?

2.How many jobs were created in Canada through Insignia Software Corporation providing library management system services to the institution? How many of these were middle-class jobs?

3.How many jobs were created in Canada through EQ Consulting Inc. being awarded two contracts for the AIIB for the implementation of market risk tools and order management systems support? How many of these were middle-class jobs?

4.Have any other AIIB contracts been awarded to Canadian companies since the original answer was provided? If so, what are they, and how many middle-class jobs in Canada did they create?

5.The answer stated: “In September 2020, the AIIB also collaborated with the Canadian Embassy in Beijing to organize an informational webinar for Canadian companies to introduce them to the Bank and potential business opportunities.” How many Canadian businesses were awarded contracts with the AIIB following this webinar? How many middle-class jobs in Canada were created as a result?

6.The answer also states: “The AIIB’s Treasury Department has also worked with Canadian financial institutions, such as TD, BMO RBC and Scotiabank, as part of its funding program. The AIIB is also working with Canadian regulators and legal advisors towards its first issuance on the Canadian fixed income market (known as the “Maple Bond” market).” How many Canadian businesses were awarded contracts with the AIIB as part of this initiative? How many middle-class jobs in Canada were created as a result?

No. 147.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 30, 2021—Regarding the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF):

Prior to agreeing to settle class-action lawsuits alleging sexual harassment in the Canada Armed Forces, in late 2017 the federal government argued in a court filing to strike the proceedings that it did not “owe a private law duty of care to individual members within the CAF to provide a safe and harassment-free work environment, or to create policies to prevent sexual harassment or sexual assault.” The federal government also argued it had no duty “to create policies to prevent sexual harassment or sexual assault which are already prohibited by the Canadian Human Rights Act.”

1.When was the Minister of National Defence and/or his office made aware this argument would be made to the court?

2.When was the Prime Minister and/or his office made aware this argument would be made to the court?

3.Was this class-action lawsuit ever discussed before the former Cabinet Committee on Litigation Management? If so, on which dates?

4.Why did the federal government believe these arguments were justified in 2017, especially given that Operation Honour was initiated in 2015?

No. 148.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 30, 2021—Regarding Global Affairs Canada:

1.What is the total number of Canadian citizens detained or imprisoned in China (not including Taiwan)? Please break that number down to numbers imprisoned vs. otherwise detained/not permitted to leave China.

2.What is the total number of permanent residents detained or imprisoned in China (not including Taiwan)? Please break that number down to numbers imprisoned vs. otherwise detained/not permitted to leave China.

3.How many of the total in each category have been convicted in a Chinese court of offences vs. awaiting trial or otherwise detained?

4.What is the number of Canadian citizens or permanent residents under sentence of death in China (not including Taiwan)?

No. 149.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 30, 2021—Regarding deportations:

1.Follow-up to Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) /Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA): The answer provided by CSC to Order Paper question 88 indicates that 58 of 254 foreign offenders granted parole for deportation were not successfully deported.

(a)How many of the 58 cases resulted from a judicial review? Other than bringing a judicial review, were there other reasons that an offender was not successfully deported? If so, what were those reasons?

(b)How many of the 58 offenders not deported were maintained in the community instead of being detained? How many of the 58 offenders were detained by Immigration/CBSA? How many were returned to CSC custody?

(c)How many of the 58 offenders are serving life sentences? How many of the 58 offenders are serving sentences for serious violent or sexual offending?

(d)Which agency has primary jurisdiction in managing foreign offenders who have been granted parole but have not been deported?

(e)Since the answer to question 88 was provided, have any of the 58 offenders been successfully deported?

2.Follow-up to CSC/CBSA/Global Affairs: For several countries (Colombia, Sudan, Somalia and Ethiopia) there have been no successful deportations since 2015. For other countries (e.g., Jamaica and Vietnam) there have been several unsuccessful deportations.

(a)Are members the Parole Board of Canada made specifically aware of those countries where parole for deportation has either not been successful or where such deportations are often unsuccessful? If not, why not?

(b)What specific actions are being taken to address the inability or difficulties of deporting offenders to certain countries?

(c)Has the issue been raised with the governments of Colombia, Ethiopia, Vietnam or Jamaica? What has been the response in each case?

No. 150.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 30, 2021—

Regarding Huawei:

1.Since 2016, how many departments, agencies, granting councils or other entities of the Government of Canada have entered into partnerships or awarded contracts to Huawei?

2.For each of these contracts or partnerships, could the government provide the following?

(a)Date

(b)Amount

(c)Start and end date of the contract

(d)Description of goods or services provided

(e)Whether the contract was sole-sourced or tendered

(f)Whether a security check was conducted in relation to the contract

3.What is the total value of all contracts or partnerships entered into with Huawei since 2016?

No. 151.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 30, 2021—In relations to the answers provided by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans to Question 28:

1.Question 2 was not answered. Therefore, the question is repeated: “The Government has asked for an RFI from Canadian shipyards on their ability to build the Diefenbaker icebreaker as a replacement for the Louis S. St-Laurent. For what reason did the Government remove the Diefenbaker from the Seaspan yard in June 2019 only to issue an RFI, including Seaspan, eight months later? Why did it take the Government eight months to issue this RFI, after removing the Diefenbaker icebreaker from the Seaspan yard, when the project is clearly extremely urgent? What explains the fact that it has taken the Government four years, since taking office in November 2015, to issue this RFI related to the replacement of the Louis S. St-Laurent?”

2.Question 3 inquired as to the critical path and milestones related to the construction of the planned polar icebreaker. The Department’s answer was that the Coast Guard: “is working with Public Services and Procurement Canada to explore options for a timely procurement of the Polar Icebreaker to meet operational requirements. ... Ultimately, Polar Icebreaker construction timelines will vary depending on the procurement approach, as shipyards’ construction workbooks and schedules differ”. The Government publicly set the objective of securing entry into service of the polar icebreaker by the end of 2029. How was that specific date selected? Does the Government have a critical path with clear milestones or does it not? If there is no critical path, how was the Government able to select the objective of “the end of 2029” without such a path? If a critical path exists, please provide that path to cover the period up to the end of 2029?

3.In relation to Question 4, the answer indicates that cost estimates for building the polar icebreaker are a “Cabinet confidence”. How then has the Government seen fit to provide a cost estimate for the acquisition of the Canadian Surface Combatants (CSC), but refuses to provide such an estimate for the polar icebreaker? Are not cost estimates for the construction of CSC also a cabinet confidence? Parliament is responsible for voting funds for all projects proposed by the Government. Therefore, when parliamentarians ask for cost estimates for particular projects, such estimates should be provided so that Parliament is able to fulfil its constitutional role. Please provide the general and current cost estimates for the construction of the polar icebreaker.

4.The answer to Question 5 indicates that the final medium icebreaker will not enter service until 2038/39. Can the Government assure Parliament that the interim icebreakers being acquired will be fully able to meet Canada’s icebreaking requirements until the final medium icebreaker enters service? Does the Government believe that additional life extensions to the current icebreaker fleet will be required, notwithstanding the acquisition of the interim icebreakers? If so, please outline any such plans.

5.Question 6 was not answered. Therefore, it is repeated with revisions given the fact that the Government has missed the objective of negotiating an umbrella agreement with Davie Shipbuilding by the end of 2020: What is the Government’s new objective for negotiating an umbrella agreement with Davie Shipbuilding? When will construction of the first medium icebreaker begin?

6.Question 8 inquired how many times the Minister responsible for the Canadian Coast Guard has met with the Minister of Public Services and Procurement since 2015 to discuss either the Polar icebreaker or medium icebreaker projects. The Department answered that the Ministers meet “regularly” to discuss fleet renewal. How often did the ministers meet during 2020 specifically for the purpose of discussing those projects — either in person or by video/phone?

No. 152.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 30, 2021—Regarding Government of Canada contracts:

1.Since 2016, how many departments, agencies or other entities of the Government of Canada have entered into partnerships or awarded contracts to social media influencers or digital influencers for sponsored content?

2.For each of these contracts or partnerships, could the government provide the following?

(a)Date

(b)Amount

(c)Start and end date of the contract

(d)Description of goods or services provided

(e)Whether the contract was sole-sourced or tendered

(f)Whether the contract specified if the content must be identified as sponsored

3.What is the total value of all contracts or partnerships entered into with social media influencers or digital influencers since 2016?

No. 153.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 30, 2021—Regarding Temporary Foreign Workers (TFW):

On March 16, 2021, Employment and Social Development Canada announced that after March 21, 2021, TFWs who will need to travel by public means to a secondary location upon arrival in Canada will be required to stay in a Government Authorized Accommodation (GAA) and await the results of their COVID-19 test.

1.How many TFWs have entered Canada since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic but prior to the change in policy effective March 21, 2021?

2.How many of these TFWs travelled by public means to a secondary location upon arrival in Canada?

No. 154.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 30, 2021—Regarding the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project:

1.Question #56 on the Order Paper asked how many investors had expressed interest in purchasing Trans Mountain in June 2018. An answer from the Department of Finance stated: “Due to commercial confidentiality, the Government cannot state the names of the companies involved in the 2018 process.” The question did not ask for the names of companies; it asked for a number. How many investors expressed interest in purchasing Trans Mountain in June 2018, as the former Minister of Finance indicated at the time?

2.Trans Mountain Pipeline LP has said that in 2020, it “…experienced a significant reduction in available insurance capacity” and that “(i)t sought and secured partial replacement policies to compensate for this reduction, but did so at a significantly higher cost.” What was the “significantly higher” cost of Trans Mountain’s increased insurance costs in 2020?

No. 155.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 20, 2021—Regarding suicide prevention:

In December 2020, the House of Commons unanimously passed a motion calling upon the federal government to take immediate action in collaboration with our provinces to establish a National Suicide Prevention hotline that consolidates all suicide crisis numbers into one easy to remember three-digit (9-8-8) hotline that is accessible to all Canadians.

1.What work has been done to date to implement a three-digit suicide prevention hotline?

2.How many public servants at Health Canada or any other department or agency of the Government of Canada are working on the implementation of this hotline, on either a full-time or part-time basis?

3.What is the budget allocated to support work to create this hotline?

4.What interaction has taken place to date between the Government of Canada and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) regarding the implementation of this hotline?

5.What date is this hotline expected to be operational?

6.Is the Government of Canada considering a different number other than 9-8-8 for the national suicide prevention hotline?

No. 156.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 20, 2021—Regarding Global Affairs Canada:

1.What is the status of a promise made during the 2015 federal election campaign to open a Canadian Embassy in Armenia?

2.When is the Canadian Embassy in Armenia expected to officially open?

3.If the Government of Canada has decided to break this campaign promise, what is the rationale for doing so? Has the Government of Canada communicated this decision to the Government of the Republic of Armenia?

No. 157.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 20, 2021—Regarding the Canada Investment Development Corporation (CDEV):

In fall/winter 2016, the Government of Canada engaged Credit Suisse to provide financial advice regarding the privatization of Canadian airports. An answer to Senate Order Paper question #2 stated “In processing Parliamentary Returns, the Government applies the Privacy Act and the principles set out in the Access to Information Act. As a result, information pertaining to the cost and publication of the Credit Suisse study have been withheld on the following grounds: a) Economic interests; b) Financial and commercial interests of a third party.”

1.Since 2016, how many reports provided to CDEV have been withheld from public release under the rationale stated above?

2.Since 2016, how many reports provided to CDEV by Credit Suisse have been withheld from public release under the rational stated above?

No. 158.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 20, 2021—Regarding the Department of National Defence (DND):

1.On what date in 2018 did the annual performance reviews for the Department of National Defence’s Order in Council appointments begin and on what date did they end? When did the annual performance review for the then-Chief of Defence Staff General Jonathan Vance begin and when did it end?

2.What was the approval process surrounding the pay raise for the Chief of Defence Staff in 2018? Did this process differ from any other process surrounding pay increases for the department’s other Order in Council appointments that year? If so, how was it different?

3.Were National Defence and the Privy Council Office the only two departments of the Government of Canada involved in this process in 2018? If not, which other departments were involved?

4.Did all of DND’s Order in Council appointments receive increases to their base salary and/or performance or “at risk” pay following their performance review in 2018? How many did not receive such increases?

No. 159.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 20, 2021—Regarding essential workers:

On February 14, 2021, Public Safety Minister Bill Blair told the CBC: “We’re working very closely with the Public Health Agency of Canada and also with our provincial health authorities to [look] at implementing a system of regular testing to help protect those essential workers and truck drivers that are coming into the country and also to ensure that they’re not the source of any new infection.”

1.Since February 14, 2021, how many rapid tests have been sent by the Government of Canada to the Canada-U.S. border to test essential workers and truck drivers entering Canada for COVID-19? How is this number broken down by province?

2.Since February 14, 2021, how many of these rapid tests have been used at the Canada-U.S. border to test essential workers and truck drivers entering Canada for COVID-19? How is this number broken down by province?

3.How many of these essential workers and truck drivers have tested positive for COVID-19? How is this number broken down by province?

No. 160.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 20, 2021—Regarding COVID-19 research:

On March 24, 2021, the Government of Canada issued a Security Policy Statement warning the research community in Canada — especially those involved in COVID-19 research — about foreign espionage and/or interference activities.

These activities pose threats to the integrity of Canada’s research enterprise, as well as our country’s national security, long-term economic competitiveness and prosperity”, the statement warned.

It further encouraged “all members of the research community — including those in government, academia, and the private sector — to take extra precautions to protect the security of their research, intellectual property, and knowledge development.”

This statement followed one on September 14, 2020 that specifically warned the COVID-19 research community to be vigilant and alert to possible threats to their people and their work. It specifically mentioned the actions of hostile actors targeting COVID-19 related research in Canada.

1.What prompted the security warning in September? Was this warning in any way related to the Ill-advised and failed Canada-China collaboration on vaccines that fell apart shortly after it was announced in May 2020? Did any suspicion or evidence of foreign state espionage prompt the September warning?

2.In total, how many research collaborations with which is Canada engaged are being carried out with organizations in countries that would be considered potentially hostile actors by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS)? Who are those actors?

3.How many research collaborations with which Canada is engaged, specifically related to COVID-19, are being carried out with organizations in countries that would be considered potentially hostile actors by CSIS? Who are those actors?

4.Have any breaches occurred or been reported as a result of research collaborations and if so, how many?

5.Has a list of the most worrisome, or potentially troublesome, actors been provided to the research community involved in collaboration?

6.The Security Warning specifically identifies both human and cyber-security threats. How many breaches can be categorized as human and how many as cyber-security breaches?

7.What security precautions were in place prior to these warnings and have they been enhanced? How?

8.In “Safeguarding Your Research”, a government online guide for researchers, it says that “Some countries view academia and associated research and innovation as an opportunity to advance their own objectives. They seek to increase their own economic prosperity at the expense of other nations through espionage or other illicit means.” In August 2020, after the vaccine deal with China collapsed, Margaret McCuaig-Johnston, a former Assistant Deputy Minister in charge of vaccine collaboration with China specifically identified China as just such a country. Why did Canada get involved with China on vaccine production when it was well known by our officials and intelligence agencies that it is a hostile actor engaged in espionage?

No. 161.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 20, 2021—Regarding the Canada Revenue Agency:

The Fall 2017 report of the Auditor General of Canada found the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) blocked more than half of the calls it received (about 29 million out of 53.5 million) because it could not handle the volume.

1.How many calls did CRA receive in 2020?

2.How many of these calls were blocked, by number and percentage?

3.How many of these calls reached an agent, by number and percentage?

4.How many of these calls went to automated self-service options, by number and percentage?

5.How many of these calls went to automated self-service options and the caller hung up in less than one minute, by number and percentage?

6.How many of these calls went to automated self-service options and the call lasted one minute or longer, by number and percentage?

No. 162.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 20, 2021—Regarding the Highly Affected Sectors Credit Availability Program (HASCAP):

1.How many applications for HASCAP loans have been received to date? What is this breakdown by industry, and province/territory?

2.How many applications for HASCAP loans have been approved to date? What is this breakdown by industry, and province/territory?

3.The HASCAP loans can range from $25,000 to $1 million for businesses which qualify.

(a)What is the amount of the average HASCAP loan?

(b)What is the amount of the average HASCAP loan per industry?

(c)What is the amount of the average HASCAP loan per province/territory?

(d)How many businesses across Canada have received the maximum $1 million loan?

(e)How many businesses across Canada have received the minimum $25,000 loan?

4.When will HASCAP loans be made available to new businesses which started in 2020?

No. 163.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 20, 2021—Regarding Enbridge Line 5:

Since November 2020, how many representatives of the Government of Canada have spoken directly, either in person or by video/phone, with Governor Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan about Enbridge Line 5? Please provide the dates and name of the Cabinet Minister or other representative of the Government of Canada who spoke directly with the Governor about Enbridge Line 5.

No. 164.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 20, 2021—Regarding the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC):

1.A Special Staff Assistance Visit Report on the Climate, Training Environment, Culture and Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP) Programme at the Royal Military College of Canada — Kingston was released in March 2017.

(a)What progress has been made to implement each of the over 70 recommendations made in the report?

2.The Auditor General of Canada released a report looking into the Royal Military College in Fall 2017.

(a)How has the Department of National Defence (DND) implemented each of the report’s six recommendations?

(b)One recommendation stated: “The Royal Military College of Canada should ensure that before senior Officer Cadets are appointed to leadership positions, they demonstrate high standards of conduct and ethical behaviour.” What progress has been made on this specific point? What is the most recent data on incidences of serious military misconduct and academic misconduct at the RMC? Please explain how “high standards of conduct and ethical behavior” is defined by the Canadian Armed Forces?

(c)The Auditor General found that at the time of its audit, some designated first responders were not fully trained to take action to prevent and respond to suicides. Is this still the case?

3.A redacted version of the final report of a Board of Inquiry into the suicides of three RMC Officer Cadets in 2016 was released in July 2018.

(a)What progress has been made on each of the recommendations in the report?

(b)In its report, the Board found that stigma was a major obstacle preventing Officer Cadets from seeking support. What progress has been made on this particular point?

No. 165.

By the Honourable Senator Boisvenu:

April 20, 2021—With regard to the Correctional Service of Canada:

Please provide:

1.The total number of admissions to federal institutions or healing lodges respectively for the years 2018-2019-2020;

2.The total number of offenders released back into the community for the years 2018-2019-2020;

3.The number of offenders released back into the community who had received an indeterminate sentence for the years 2018-2019-2020;

4.The number of offenders released back into the community who had received a determinate sentence for the years 2018-2019-2020;

5.The number of offenders released back into the community from medium-security federal institutions for the years 2018-2019-2020;

6.The number of offenders released back into the community from minimum-security federal institutions for the years 2018-2019-2020; and

7.The total number of incarcerated offenders in federal institutions for the years 2018-2019-2020.

No. 166.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 30, 2021—Regarding the Canada Council for the Arts:

1.The answer to question #4 on the Order Paper stated 31 allegations of discrimination, harassment and sexual misconduct have been brought forward against grant recipients since April 2018. Does this figure represent 31 separate allegations, or does it include multiple allegations against a single recipient?

2.The answer stated that 16 reviews had been undertaken since April 2018, but only one grant had been reversed. What is the status of the other 15 reviews?

3.The answer stated: ““Concerned Status” enables the Council to more closely monitor the organizational health of an organization receiving core funding...Through “Concerned Status”, Council can place additional conditions on the release of funding installments.” How many grant recipients are currently placed on “Concerned Status”?

4.The answer stated: ““Major Warning” provides a process through which Council informs a core-funded organization of serious concerns with respect to either their competitiveness against the component assessment criteria and objectives, or their organizational health and viability. A “Major Warning” is accompanied by a funding decrease. Multiple warnings lead to the cessation of core funding.” How many grant recipients are currently subject to a “Major Warning”?

5.The answer stated that only one grant had been reversed since April 2018. How much was that grant worth? How was the money recouped?

No. 167.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 30, 2021—Regarding the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB):

The Department of Employment and Social Development Canada admitted that it knowingly paid $500 million in CERB payments to those who were already collecting Employment Insurance and ineligible for it. This was a design of the program, not a bug, Deputy Minister Graham Flack told the House of Commons Public Accounts Committee: “We knew when we were launching the benefit that it was not possible in the time we had to have real-time reconciliation between the two systems.”

1.At the time CERB was launching and there was no expectation to have “real-time reconciliation between the two systems”, when was it expected that reconciliation would take place?

2.What if any measures were put in place to ensure reconciliation would take place?

3.If no measures were put in place at the time, what measures have been put in place now to establish reconciliation?

4.Was there an estimate at time of the total cost of ineligible payments that would be sent out? If it was not $500 million, what was it? Was the Minister provided with that estimate? If not, why not?

5.How much money has been recovered so far?

6.Last May when news of fraudulent applications for CERB became public, the Prime Minister said, “Of course there is going to be a few people who misrepresent themselves and try to defraud the situation.” How many people account for the half a billion dollars in overpayments? Is it a few, or more than a few?

No. 168.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 30, 2021—Regarding Canadians fully vaccinated against COVID-19:

1.Which departments, agencies or other entities of the Government of Canada have worked on guidance or interim guidance for Canadians fully vaccinated against COVID-19 (two weeks or more after either the receipt of the second dose in a two-dose series of vaccines, or receipt of one dose of a single-dose vaccines)?

2.What is the guidance or interim guidance for fully vaccinated Canadians under the following circumstances?

(a)Fully vaccinated individuals meeting other fully vaccinated individuals

(b)Fully vaccinated individuals meeting unvaccinated individuals

(c)Relaxing non-pharmaceutical interventions such as physical distancing and the wearing of face masks

(d)Congregate living settings, such as Long-Term Care facilities or correctional institutions

(e)Domestic travel between provinces, including testing and quarantine provisions

(f)International travel, including testing and quarantine provisions

3.If this guidance or interim guidance has not been released, when is it expected to be made public?

No. 169.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 30, 2021—Regarding COVID-19 variants of interest:

1.Which variants of interest are being screened in Canada amongst confirmed cases of COVID-19, and when did monitoring begin for each of these variants of interest?

2.When did Canada begin screening confirmed cases of COVID-19 for the “double mutant” B.1.617 variant of interest first identified in India?

3.When was the Government of Canada first notified of a confirmed case of B.1.617 in Canada?

4.Do all jurisdictions in Canada screen confirmed cases of COVID-19 for the “triple mutant” B.1.618 variant first identified in India?

(a)If so, when did this screening begin?

(b)If this screening is not currently conducted in all jurisdictions, why not?

5.How many cases of variants of interests have been confirmed in Canada? How does this number break down by province?

6.How many deaths related to variants of interests have been confirmed in Canada?

No. 170.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 30, 2021—Regarding Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey:

Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey (LFS) for April 2020 was leaked to a media outlet, which publicized the numbers over half an hour before their official release. When a Statistics Canada investigation into the leak was announced, former Finance Minister Bill Morneau said: “We will be leaving no stone unturned” and “We need to make sure that information that’s important like this, that can be market moving is kept confidential right up until the time that it is released publicly.”

1.A report dated June 5, 2020, on the investigation into this leak led by the Audit and Evaluation branch of Statistics Canada concluded: “Based on the investigation and review of results, there is no evidence that Bloomberg obtained Labour Force Survey pre-release information from Statistics Canada personnel, nor as a result of a technical error.” Has this incident been further investigated by any of the organizations and/or responsible Minister’s office which received the advance release of the April 2020 LFS?

(a)Finance Canada

(b)Employment and Social Development Canada

(c)Privy Council Office

(d)Bank of Canada

(e)Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada

2.Regarding investigations conducted by the five organizations listed above:

(a)On what date did the investigation begin?

(b)Is the investigation still ongoing? If so, when is it expected to conclude?

(c)If the investigation has concluded:

(i)When did it end?

(ii)Has a final report been submitted regarding this investigation? If so, when, and who received it? What were its findings?

(d)Were any outside investigators hired to assist in the investigation?

(i)If so, how many?

(ii)If so, what was the cost?

(e)How many individuals were interviewed during the investigation? Could a list of their names be provided?

(f)How many email records were analyzed during the investigation?

(g)How many telephone account logs were reviewed during the investigation?

(h)Was blame assigned to any individual, office, or department for the LFS leak, as a result of the investigation or by any other means? If so, who was found to be ultimately responsible for the leak? Was any sanction applied as a result?

3.After the leak, Statistics Canada suspended the pre-release of LFS information to government officials.

(a)Has this practice since resumed?

(b)If not, is it expected to resume?

(c)If so, when did it resume?

(d)If so, has it resumed for all five organizations who previously received this information?

(e)If so, were any new or enhanced security measures attached to providing advance notice of this information to government officials?

4.Statistics Canada’s report into their investigation noted: “On April 7, 2020, pre-release access to the LFS estimates was granted by authorization of the Clerk of the Privy Council on the recommendation of the Chief Statistician to two additional departments: Bank of Canada and Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada.” Why did the former Clerk of the Privy Council authorize these two entities to have access to the pre-release of the LFS?

5.Is the Government of Canada embarrassed that it did not have the integrity to keep this information secure?

No. 171.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 30, 2021—Regarding COVID-19 vaccinations:

1.How many Canadians does the Government of Canada estimate have received COVID-19 vaccines while living in the United States?

2.How many Canadians does the Government of Canada estimate have travelled to the United States to specifically receive one or more doses of COVID-19 vaccines?

3.How many Canadians does the Government of Canada estimate have received COVID-19 vaccines while on short term work visas, such as an O-1 visa, in the United States?

4.How many Canadians does the Government of Canada estimate have received COVID-19 vaccines upon the invitation of Indigenous groups in the United States?

5.How many Canadians in total does the Government of Canada estimate have received COVID-19 vaccines in the United States?

No. 172.

By the Honourable Senator Pate:

April 30, 2021—Regarding Bill C-22:

1.For each offence for which Bill C-22 repeals a mandatory minimum penalty, what is the distribution of sentences that were handed down for those admitted to prison/penitentiary:

(a)Broken down by sentences under the current (2021) mandatory minimum penalty, at this minimum, and over this minimum;

(b)For four periods, each of the years: before the minimum came into effect, and two and three and four years after the minimum came into effect;

(c)Disaggregated by race of the person sentenced (Indigenous, Black, other racialized groups, Caucasian);

(d)If there are null responses in (a), (b) or (c), please indicate whether each null response was because:

(i)The relevant data is not collected;

(ii)The relevant data is not organized in a way that makes it possible to answer the question;

(iii)The relevant response is being withheld;

(iv)Other reasons;

(e)With respect to responses under (d)(ii) above, please describe how the data is organized;

(f)With respect to responses under (d)(iii) above, please explain the justification for withholding the information;

(g)With respect to responses under (d)(iv) above, please explain the other reason.