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Order Paper and Notice Paper

Issue 204

Tuesday, May 28, 2024
2 p.m.

Orders Of The Day | Notice Paper | Written Questions


The Order Paper and Notice Paper is a document that guides the deliberations of the Senate and lists items of business currently before it. These items are listed in several different categories and in a priority according to an arrangement adopted by the Senate as stipulated in the rules. The majority of these items constitute the Orders of the Day which are called following Routine Proceedings. These items are themselves divided into two principal categories - government business and other business. Within each of these two categories are items for bills, motions, inquiries and reports of committees.

The Notice Paper contains the text of motions and inquiries not yet called for debate.

The Order Paper and Notice Paper is prepared every day in advance of the actual sitting.


Order of Business

(The following is an outline of a typical sitting day in the Senate. Variations are possible subject to the Rules and to the decisions of the Senate.)

Senators' Statements (18 minutes)

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS (30 minutes)

1. Tabling of Documents

2. Presenting or Tabling Reports from Committees

3. Government Notices of Motions

4. Government Notices of Inquiries

5. Introduction and First Reading of Government Bills

6. Introduction and First Reading of Senate Public Bills

7. First Reading of Commons Public Bills

8. Reading of Petitions for Private Bills

9. Introduction and First Reading of Private Bills

10. Tabling of Reports from Interparliamentary Delegations

11. Notices of Motions

12. Notices of Inquiries

13. Tabling of Petitions

Question Period (30 minutes)

Delayed Answers

ORDERS OF THE DAY

Government Business

Bills — Messages from the House of Commons

Bills — Third Reading

Bills — Reports of Committees

Bills — Second Reading

Reports of Committees — Other

Motions

Inquiries

Other

Other Business

Bills — Messages from the House of Commons

Senate Public Bills — Third Reading

Commons Public Bills — Third Reading

Private Bills — Third Reading

Senate Public Bills — Reports of Committees

Commons Public Bills — Reports of Committees

Private Bills — Reports of Committees

Senate Public Bills — Second Reading

Commons Public Bills — Second Reading

Private Bills — Second Reading

Reports of Committees — Other

Motions

Inquiries

Other

NOTICE PAPER

Notices of Motions

Notices of Inquiries


Orders Of The Day

Government Business

Bills – Messages from the House of Commons

Nil


Bills – Third Reading

Nil


Bills – Reports of Committees

Nil


Bills – Second Reading

No. 1.

March 21, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Cotter, seconded by the Honourable Senator Petitclerc, for the second reading of Bill S-17, An Act to correct certain anomalies, inconsistencies, out-dated terminology and errors and to deal with other matters of a non-controversial and uncomplicated nature in the Statutes and Regulations of Canada and to repeal certain provisions that have expired, lapsed or otherwise ceased to have effect.


Reports of Committees – Other

No. 7.

November 22, 2022—Resuming debate on the consideration of the first report of the Standing Senate Committee on Official Languages (Subject matter of Bill C-13, An Act to amend the Official Languages Act, to enact the Use of French in Federally Regulated Private Businesses Act and to make related amendments to other Acts), tabled in the Senate on November 17, 2022.

No. 9.

December 14, 2022—Consideration of the ninth report of the Standing Senate Committee on National Finance, entitled Supplementary Estimates (B) for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2023, tabled in the Senate on December 14, 2022.

No. 10.

May 17, 2023—Consideration of the fourth report of the Standing Senate Committee on National Security, Defence and Veterans Affairs (The subject matter of those elements contained in Division 24 of Part 4 of Bill C-47, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 28, 2023), tabled in the Senate on May 17, 2023.

No. 11.

May 18, 2023—Consideration of the seventh report of the Standing Senate Committee on Fisheries and Oceans (The subject matter of those elements contained in Subdivisions A, B and C of Division 21 of Part 4 of Bill C-47, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 28, 2023), tabled in the Senate on May 18, 2023.

No. 12.

June 1, 2023—Consideration of the fifth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Transport and Communications (The subject matter of those elements contained in Division 2 of Part 3, and Divisions 22 and 23 of Part 4 of Bill C-47, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 28, 2023), tabled in the Senate on June 1, 2023.

No. 13.

June 1, 2023—Consideration of the seventh report of the Standing Senate Committee on Banking, Commerce and the Economy (The subject matter of those elements contained in Clauses 118 to 122 concerning cryptoasset mining in Part 2, and Divisions 1, 2, 6, 7, 26, 33 and 37 of Part 4 of Bill C-47, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 28, 2023), tabled in the Senate on June 1, 2023.

No. 14.

June 1, 2023—Consideration of the eleventh report of the Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade (The subject matter of those elements contained in Divisions 4, 5 10 and 11 of Part 4, and in Subdivision A of Division 3 of Part 4 of Bill C-47, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 28, 2023), tabled in the Senate on June 1, 2023.

No. 15.

November 8, 2023—Resuming debate on the consideration of the fifth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources, entitled The subject matter of those elements contained in Divisions 20 and 36 of Part 4 of Bill C-47, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 28, 2023, deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on June 2, 2023.

No. 16.

June 6, 2023—Consideration of the fourteenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology (The subject matter of those elements contained in Divisions 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 25, 27, 28, 29, 35 and 38 of Part 4 of Bill C-47, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 28, 2023), deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on June 2, 2023.

No. 17.

June 6, 2023—Consideration of the fourteenth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs (The subject matter of those elements contained in Divisions 30, 31, 34 and 39 of Part 4, and in Subdivision B of Division 3 of Part 4 of Bill C-47, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 28, 2023), deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on June 2, 2023.


Motions

No. 1.

November 25, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Gold, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson:

That the following Address be presented to Her Excellency the Governor General of Canada:

To Her Excellency the Right Honourable Mary May Simon, Chancellor and Principal Companion of the Order of Canada, Chancellor and Commander of the Order of Military Merit, Chancellor and Commander of the Order of Merit of the Police Forces, Governor General and Commander-in-Chief of Canada.

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY:

We, Her Majesty’s most loyal and dutiful subjects, the Senate of Canada in Parliament assembled, beg leave to offer our humble thanks to Your Excellency for the gracious Speech which Your Excellency has addressed to both Houses of Parliament.

No. 132.

October 19, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Gold, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson:

That, for the remainder of the current session and notwithstanding any provision of the Rules, when the Senate sits on a Thursday, it stand adjourned at the later of 6 p.m. or the end of Government Business, as if that time were, for all purposes, the ordinary time of adjournment provided for in rule 3-4.

No. 167.

May 21, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson, seconded by the Honourable Senator Lankin, P.C.:

That the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament be authorized to examine and report on the role of non-affiliated senators, including mechanisms to facilitate their full contribution to and participation in a modernized Senate; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than December 19, 2024.

No. 172.

May 21, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Gold, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson:

That, in accordance with rule 10-11(1), the Standing Senate Committee on National Security, Defence and Veterans Affairs be authorized to examine the subject matter of Bill C-20, An Act establishing the Public Complaints and Review Commission and amending certain Acts and statutory instruments, introduced in the House of Commons on May 19, 2022, in advance of the said bill coming before the Senate;

That, for the purposes of this study, the committee be authorized to meet even though the Senate may then be sitting or adjourned, with the application of rules 12-18(1) and 12-18(2) being suspended in relation thereto;

That the committee submit its final report to the Senate no later than June 13, 2024; and

That the committee be authorized to deposit its report with the Clerk of the Senate if the Senate is not then sitting, provided that it then be placed on the Orders of the Day for consideration at the next sitting following the one on which the depositing is recorded in the Journals of the Senate.

And on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Plett, seconded by the Honourable Senator Poirier:

That the motion be not now adopted, but that it be amended by deleting the second paragraph.

No. 175.

By the Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson:

May 23, 2024—That the Standing Senate Committee on National Finance be authorized to examine and report upon the expenditures set out in the Supplementary Estimates (A) for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2025;

That, for the purpose of this study, the committee have the power to meet, even though the Senate may then be sitting or adjourned, and that rules 12-18(1) and 12-18(2) be suspended in relation thereto; and

That the committee be permitted, notwithstanding usual practices, to deposit its report with the Clerk of the Senate, if the Senate is not then sitting, and that the report be deemed to have been tabled in the Senate.


Inquiries

No. 3.

September 22, 2022—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Gagné, calling the attention of the Senate to the life of our late Sovereign, Queen Elizabeth II.

No. 4.

By the Honourable Senator Gagné:

November 15, 2022—That she will call the attention of the Senate to the Fall Economic Statement 2022, tabled in the House of Commons on November 3, 2022, by the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, the Honourable Chrystia Freeland, P.C., M.P., and in the Senate on November 15, 2022.

No. 5.

October 17, 2023—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Gold, P.C., calling the attention of the Senate to the budget entitled A Made-in-Canada Plan: Strong Middle Class, Affordable Economy, Healthy Future, tabled in the House of Commons on March 28, 2023, by the Minister of Finance, the Honourable Chrystia Freeland, P.C., M.P., and in the Senate on March 29, 2023.

No. 6.

November 28, 2023—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson, calling the attention of the Senate to the 2023 Fall Economic Statement, tabled in the House of Commons on November 21, 2023, by the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, the Honourable Chrystia Freeland, P.C., M.P., and in the Senate on November 22, 2023.

No. 7.

April 10, 2024—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson, calling the attention of the Senate to the life of the late Right Honourable Brian Mulroney, P.C.

No. 8.

By the Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson:

April 17, 2024—That she will call the attention of the Senate to the budget entitled Fairness for Every Generation, tabled in the House of Commons on April 16, 2024, by the Minister of Finance, the Honourable Chrystia Freeland, P.C., M.P., and in the Senate on April 17, 2024.


Other

Nil


Other Business

Rule 4-15(2) states:

Except as otherwise ordered by the Senate, any item of Other Business on the Order Paper and any motion or inquiry on the Notice Paper that have not been proceeded with during 15 sitting days shall be dropped from the Order Paper and Notice Paper.

Consequently, the number appearing in parentheses indicates the number of sittings since the item was last proceeded with.

Bills – Messages from the House of Commons

No. 1. (four)

May 8, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Cardozo, seconded by the Honourable Senator Klyne:

That, in relation to Bill S-202, An Act to amend the Parliament of Canada Act (Parliamentary Visual Artist Laureate), the Senate agree to the amendments made by the House of Commons; and

That a message be sent to the House of Commons to acquaint that house accordingly.—(Honourable Senator Martin)


Senate Public Bills – Third Reading

No. 1. (two)

May 21, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Pate, seconded by the Honourable Senator Moodie, for the third reading of Bill S-212, An Act to amend the Criminal Records Act, to make consequential amendments to other Acts and to repeal a regulation, as amended.

And on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin:

That Bill S-212, as amended, be not now read a third time, but that it be further amended, in clause 5, on page 3,

(a) by replacing line 5 with the following:

(a) ten years, in the case of an offence that is prose-”;

(b) by replacing line 14 with the following:

(b) five years, in the case of an offence that is punish-”.—(Honourable Senator McBean)


No. 2. (five)

February 27, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, seconded by the Honourable Senator Dalphond, for the third reading of Bill S-244, An Act to amend the Department of Employment and Social Development Act and the Employment Insurance Act (Employment Insurance Council), as amended.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 3. (three)

April 9, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Moncion, seconded by the Honourable Senator Sorensen, for the third reading of Bill S-252, An Act respecting Jury Duty Appreciation Week.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 4. (five)

November 23, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Downe, seconded by the Honourable Senator Quinn, for the third reading of Bill S-258, An Act to amend the Canada Revenue Agency Act (reporting on unpaid income tax).—(Honourable Senator Seidman)


Commons Public Bills – Third Reading

No. 1.

May 9, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McCallum, seconded by the Honourable Senator Al Zaibak, for the third reading of Bill C-226, An Act respecting the development of a national strategy to assess, prevent and address environmental racism and to advance environmental justice.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 2. (five)

May 2, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Martin, seconded by the Honourable Senator Plett, for the third reading of Bill C-241, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (deduction of travel expenses for tradespersons).—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 3.

May 23, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Martin, seconded by the Honourable Senator Seidman, for the third reading of Bill C-288, An Act to amend the Telecommunications Act (transparent and accurate broadband services information).


Private Bills – Third Reading

Nil


Senate Public Bills – Reports of Committees

No. 1. (six)

April 9, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Cotter, seconded by the Honourable Senator Woo, for the adoption of the twenty-second report of the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs (Bill S-231, An Act to amend the Criminal Code, the Criminal Records Act, the National Defence Act and the DNA Identification Act, with amendments), presented in the Senate on December 12, 2023.—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 2. (three)

May 8, 2024—Consideration of the twentieth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology (Bill S-235, An Act to amend the Citizenship Act and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, with amendments and observations), presented in the Senate on May 8, 2024.—(Honourable Senator Omidvar)


Commons Public Bills – Reports of Committees

Nil


Private Bills – Reports of Committees

Nil


Senate Public Bills – Second Reading

No. 1. (two)

February 10, 2022—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McPhedran, seconded by the Honourable Senator White, for the second reading of Bill S-201, An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act and the Regulation Adapting the Canada Elections Act for the Purposes of a Referendum (voting age).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 2. (ten)

February 24, 2022—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Ataullahjan, for the second reading of Bill S-204, An Act to amend the Customs Tariff (goods from Xinjiang).—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 3. (four)

November 30, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McCallum, seconded by the Honourable Senator Mégie, for the second reading of Bill S-218, An Act to amend the Department for Women and Gender Equality Act.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 4. (five)

December 9, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Carignan, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Housakos, for the second reading of Bill S-220, An Act to amend the Languages Skills Act (Governor General).—(Honourable Senator Ringuette)

No. 5. (fifteen)

April 7, 2022—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Carignan, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Plett, for the second reading of Bill S-221, An Act to amend the Governor General’s Act (retiring annuity and other benefits).—(Honourable Senator Carignan, P.C.)

No. 6. (fourteen)

November 24, 2021—Second reading of Bill S-226, An Act to amend the Constitution Act, 1867 and the Parliament of Canada Act (Speaker of the Senate).—(Honourable Senator Mercer)

No. 7. (two)

March 24, 2022—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Patterson (Nunavut), seconded by the Honourable Senator Tannas, for the second reading of Bill S-228, An Act to amend the Constitution Act, 1867 (property qualifications of Senators).—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 8. (six)

December 14, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Carignan, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Housakos, for the second reading of Bill S-229, An Act to amend the Language Skills Act (Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick).—(Honourable Senator Dalphond)

No. 9. (thirteen)

March 29, 2022—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Wells, for the second reading of Bill S-237, An Act to establish the Foreign Influence Registry and to amend the Criminal Code.—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 10. (three)

March 22, 2022—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Ringuette, seconded by the Honourable Senator Ravalia, for the second reading of Bill S-239, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (criminal interest rate).—(Honourable Senator Petitclerc)

No. 11. (four)

April 19, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin, for the second reading of Bill S-247, An Act to amend the Justice for Victims of Corrupt Foreign Officials Act (Sergei Magnitsky Law).—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 12. (seven)

March 28, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Boisvenu, seconded by the Honourable Senator Seidman, for the second reading of Bill S-255, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (murder of an intimate partner, one’s own child or an intimate partner’s child).—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 13. (fourteen)

November 29, 2022—Second reading of Bill S-257, An Act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act (protecting against discrimination based on political belief).—(Honourable Senator Ataullahjan)

No. 14. (four)

June 1, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Loffreda, seconded by the Honourable Senator Moncion, for the second reading of Bill S-259, An Act to designate the month of March as Hellenic Heritage Month.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 15. (seven)

June 13, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Martin, seconded by the Honourable Senator Housakos, for the second reading of Bill S-260, An Act respecting National Diffuse Midline Glioma Awareness Day.—(Honourable Senator Loffreda)

No. 16. (fourteen)

October 5, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McPhedran, seconded by the Honourable Senator McCallum, for the second reading of Bill S-261, An Act respecting non-disclosure agreements.—(Honourable Senator McPhedran)

No. 17. (fourteen)

October 5, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Omidvar, seconded by the Honourable Senator Ravalia, for the second reading of Bill S-262, An Act to amend the Citizenship Act (Oath of Citizenship).—(Honourable Senator Omidvar)

No. 18. (fourteen)

May 9, 2023—Second reading of Bill S-263, An Act respecting the National Strategy to Combat Human Trafficking.—(Honourable Senator Ataullahjan)

No. 19.

October 17, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Boisvenu, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin, for the second reading of Bill S-265, An Act to enact the Federal Ombudsperson for Victims of Crime Act, to amend the Canadian Victims Bill of Rights and to establish a framework for implementing the rights of victims of crime.—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 20. (nine)

October 26, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Boisvenu, seconded by the Honourable Senator Seidman, for the second reading of Bill S-266, An Act to amend the Criminal Code and the Sex Offender Information Registration Act.—(Honourable Senator Boisvenu)

No. 21. (seven)

March 20, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Ataullahjan, seconded by the Honourable Senator Martin, for the second reading of Bill S-267, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (aggravating circumstance — evacuation order or emergency).—(Honourable Senator Ataullahjan)

No. 22. (one)

October 17, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Tannas, seconded by the Honourable Senator Verner, P.C., for the second reading of Bill S-268, An Act to amend the Criminal Code and the Indian Act.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 23. (fifteen)

October 4, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McCallum, seconded by the Honourable Senator White, for the second reading of Bill S-271, An Act to amend the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Act.—(Honourable Senator McPhedran)

No. 24. (fifteen)

October 3, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McCallum, seconded by the Honourable Senator White, for the second reading of Bill S-272, An Act to amend the Director of Public Prosecutions Act.—(Honourable Senator McPhedran)

No. 25. (three)

September 21, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McCallum, seconded by the Honourable Senator White, for the second reading of Bill S-274, An Act to establish National Thanadelthur Day.—(Honourable Senator McPhedran)

No. 26. (four)

September 26, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, seconded by the Honourable Senator Klyne, for the second reading of Bill S-275, An Act to amend the Bank of Canada Act (mandate, monetary policy governance and accountability).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 27. (one)

May 21, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator MacDonald, seconded by the Honourable Senator Housakos, for the second reading of Bill S-277, An Act respecting a framework to strengthen Canada–Taiwan relations.—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 28. (twelve)

October 17, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Omidvar, seconded by the Honourable Senator Petitclerc, for the second reading of Bill S-278, An Act to amend the Special Economic Measures Act (disposal of foreign state assets).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 29. (one)

February 7, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Omidvar, seconded by the Honourable Senator Dasko, for the second reading of Bill S-279, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (data on registered charities).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 30. (five)

November 28, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Mégie, seconded by the Honourable Senator Cotter, for the second reading of Bill S-280, An Act respecting a national framework on sickle cell disease.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 31. (three)

November 8, 2023—Second reading of Bill S-281, An Act to amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act (parole review).—(Honourable Senator Boisvenu)

No. 32. (four)

March 21, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Moodie, seconded by the Honourable Senator Boehm, for the second reading of Bill S-282, An Act respecting a national strategy for children and youth in Canada.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 33. (eight)

March 19, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Dasko, seconded by the Honourable Senator Petitclerc, for the second reading of Bill S-283, An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act (demographic information).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 34.

May 23, 2024—Second reading of Bill S-284, An Act to establish a National Framework on Heart Failure.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 35.

May 23, 2024—Second reading of Bill S-285, An Act to amend the Canada Business Corporations Act (purpose of a corporation).—(Honourable Senator Miville-Dechêne)


Commons Public Bills – Second Reading

No. 1. (three)

November 30, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Dasko, seconded by the Honourable Senator Coyle, for the second reading of Bill C-252, An Act to amend the Food and Drugs Act (prohibition of food and beverage marketing directed at children).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 2. (eight)

October 19, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Seidman, for the second reading of Bill C-281, An Act to amend the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Act, the Justice for Victims of Corrupt Foreign Officials Act (Sergei Magnitsky Law), the Broadcasting Act and the Prohibiting Cluster Munitions Act.—(Honourable Senator Patterson)

No. 3. (eight)

November 30, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Ravalia, seconded by the Honourable Senator Woo, for the second reading of Bill C-284, An Act to establish a national strategy for eye care.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 4. (thirteen)

February 6, 2024—Second reading of Bill C-290, An Act to amend the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act and to make a consequential amendment to the Conflict of Interest Act.—(Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson)

No. 5.

December 7, 2023—Second reading of Bill C-295, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (neglect of vulnerable adults).—(Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson)

No. 6. (nine)

February 29, 2024—Second reading of Bill C-320, An Act to amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act (disclosure of information to victims).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 7. (nine)

February 29, 2024—Second reading of Bill C-321, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (assaults against persons who provide health services and first responders).—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 8.

May 21, 2024—Second reading of Bill C-355, An Act to prohibit the export by air of horses for slaughter and to make related amendments to certain Acts.—(Honourable Senator Dalphond)


Private Bills – Second Reading

Nil


Reports of Committees – Other

No. 31. (fifteen)

February 14, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Moncion, seconded by the Honourable Senator Yussuff for the adoption of the seventh report of the Standing Committee on Internal Economy, Budgets and Administration, entitled Senate Budget 2023-24, presented in the Senate on February 7, 2023.—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 33. (thirteen)

October 3, 2023—Resuming debate on the consideration of the fifth report (interim) of the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament, entitled Equity between recognized parties and recognized parliamentary groups, tabled in the Senate on March 9, 2023.—(Honourable Senator Bellemare)

No. 40. (eight)

March 19, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Massicotte, seconded by the Honourable Senator Francis for the adoption of the fourth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources, entitled Hydrogen: A Viable Option for a Net-Zero Canada in 2050?, presented in the Senate on May 9, 2023.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 62. (thirteen)

February 6, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Moncion, seconded by the Honourable Senator Cormier for the adoption of the tenth report of the Standing Committee on Internal Economy, Budgets and Administration, entitled Senate Budget 2024-25, presented in the Senate on December 15, 2023.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 63. (nine)

February 28, 2024—Consideration of the sixth report (interim) of the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament, entitled Summary of Evidence: Committee Structure and Mandates, tabled in the Senate on February 28, 2024.—(Honourable Senator Bellemare)

No. 67. (one)

May 21, 2024—Consideration of the twenty-first report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology, entitled Act Now: Solutions for Temporary and Migrant Labour in Canada, deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on May 21, 2024.—(Honourable Senator Omidvar)

No. 68.

May 23, 2024—Consideration of the eighth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Fisheries and Oceans, entitled Sealing the Future: A Call to Action, tabled in the Senate on May 23, 2024.—(Honourable Senator Manning)


Motions

No. 4. (fourteen)

March 24, 2022—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Wells:

That the Senate call on the Government of Canada to:

(a)denounce the illegitimacy of the Cuban regime and recognize the Cuban opposition and civil society as valid interlocutors; and

(b)call on the Cuban regime to ensure the right of the Cuban people to protest peacefully without fear of reprisal and repudiation.—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 5. (five)

May 5, 2022—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Smith:

That the Standing Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade be authorized to examine and report on the situation in Lebanon and determine whether Canada should appoint a special envoy, when and if the committee is formed; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than February 28, 2022.—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 6. (two)

November 25, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Pate, seconded by the Honourable Senator Duncan:

That the Standing Senate Committee on National Finance be authorized to examine and report on a road map for post-pandemic economic and social policy to address the human, social and financial costs of economic marginalization and inequality, when and if the committee is formed;

That, given recent calls for action from Indigenous, provincial, territorial and municipal jurisdictions, the committee examine in particular potential national approaches to interjurisdictional collaboration to implement a guaranteed livable basic income; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than December 31, 2022.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 7. (eleven)

December 2, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Galvez, seconded by the Honourable Senator Forest:

That the Senate of Canada recognize that:

(a)climate change is an urgent crisis that requires an immediate and ambitious response;

(b)human activity is unequivocally warming the atmosphere, ocean and land at an unprecedented pace, and is provoking weather and climate extremes in every region across the globe, including in the Arctic, which is warming at more than twice the global rate;

(c)failure to address climate change is resulting in catastrophic consequences especially for Canadian youth, Indigenous Peoples and future generations; and

(d)climate change is negatively impacting the health and safety of Canadians, and the financial stability of Canada;

That the Senate declare that Canada is in a national climate emergency which requires that Canada uphold its international commitments with respect to climate change and increase its climate action in line with the Paris Agreement’s objective of holding global warming well below two degrees Celsius and pursuing efforts to keep global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius; and

That the Senate commit to action on mitigation and adaptation in response to the climate emergency and that it consider this urgency for action while undertaking its parliamentary business.—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 11. (nine)

November 25, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McCallum, seconded by the Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson:

That the Senate of Canada call on the federal government to adopt anti-racism as the sixth pillar of the Canada Health Act, prohibiting discrimination based on race and affording everyone the equal right to the protection and benefit of the law.—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 12.

November 25, 2021—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McCallum, seconded by the Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources be authorized to examine and report on the cumulative positive and negative impacts of resource extraction and development, and their effects on environmental, economic and social considerations, when and if the committee is formed; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than December 31, 2022.—(Honourable Senator Wells)

No. 19. (eleven)

March 24, 2022—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Patterson (Nunavut), seconded by the Honourable Senator Greene:

Whereas the Senate provides representation for groups that are often underrepresented in Parliament, such as Aboriginal peoples, visible minorities and women;

Whereas paragraph (3) of section 23 of the Constitution Act, 1867 requires that, in order to be qualified for appointment to and to maintain a place in the Senate, a person must own land with a net worth of at least four thousand dollars in the province for which he or she is appointed;

Whereas a person’s personal circumstances or the availability of real property in a particular location may prevent him or her from owning the required property;

Whereas appointment to the Senate should not be restricted to those who own real property of a minimum net worth;

Whereas the existing real property qualification is inconsistent with the democratic values of modern Canadian society and is no longer an appropriate or relevant measure of the fitness of a person to serve in the Senate;

Whereas, in the case of Quebec, each of the twenty-four Senators representing the province must be appointed for and must have either their real property qualification in or be resident of a specified Electoral Division;

Whereas an amendment to the Constitution of Canada in relation to any provision that applies to one or more, but not all, provinces may be made by proclamation issued by the Governor General under the Great Seal of Canada only where so authorized by resolutions of the Senate and House of Commons and of the legislative assembly of each province to which the amendment applies;

Whereas the Supreme Court of Canada has determined that a full repeal of paragraph (3) of section 23 of the Constitution Act, 1867, respecting the real property qualification of Senators, would require a resolution of the Quebec National Assembly pursuant to section 43 of the Constitution Act, 1982;

Now, therefore, the Senate resolves that an amendment to the Constitution of Canada be authorized to be made by proclamation issued by Her Excellency the Governor General under the Great Seal of Canada in accordance with the Schedule hereto.

SCHEDULE

AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF CANADA

1.(1) Paragraph (3) of section 23 of the Constitution Act, 1867 is repealed.

(2) Section 23 of the Act is amended by replacing the semi-colon at the end of paragraph (5) with a period and by repealing paragraph (6).

2.The Declaration of Qualification set out in The Fifth Schedule to the Act is replaced by the following:

I, A.B., do declare and testify that I am by law duly qualified to be appointed a member of the Senate of Canada.

3. This Amendment may be cited as the Constitution Amendment, [year of proclamation] (Real property qualification of Senators).—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 30. (eleven)

February 8, 2022—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Tannas, seconded by the Honourable Senator Black:

That, notwithstanding any provision of the Rules, previous order or usual practice:

1.except as provided in this order, the question not be put on the motion for third reading of a government bill unless the orders for resuming debate at second and third reading have, together, been called at least three times, in addition to the sittings at which the motions for second and third readings were moved;

2.when a government bill has been read a first time, and before a motion is moved to set the date for second reading, the Leader of the Government in the Senate or the Deputy Leader of the Government in the Senate may, without notice, move that the bill be deemed an urgent matter, and that the provisions of paragraph 1 of this order not apply to proceedings on the bill; and

3.when a motion has been moved pursuant to paragraph 2 of this order, the following provisions apply:

(a)the debate shall only deal with whether the bill should be deemed an urgent matter or not;

(b)the debate shall not be adjourned;

(c)the debate shall last a maximum of 20 minutes;

(d)no senator shall speak for more than 5 minutes;

(e)no senators shall speak more than once;

(f)the debate shall not be interrupted for any purpose, except for the reading of a message from the Crown or an event announced in such a message;

(g)the debate may continue beyond the ordinary time of adjournment, if necessary, until the conclusion of the debate and consequential business;

(h)the time taken in debate and for any vote shall not count as part of Routine Proceedings;

(i)no amendment or other motion shall be received, except a motion that a certain senator be now heard or do now speak;

(j)when debate concludes or the time for debate expires, the Speaker shall put the question; and

(k)any standing vote requested shall not be deferred, and the bells shall ring for only 15 minutes.—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 68. (fifteen)

September 19, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Lankin, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Jaffer:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs be authorized to examine and report on the impact of subsection 268(3) of the Criminal Code, enacted in 1997, including but not limited to:

(a)the reasons why there have been no prosecutions under this provision since its enactment 25 years ago; and

(b)the extent to which female genital mutilation is currently occurring in Canada and to Canadian girls taken abroad for such procedures;

That the committee make recommendations, as appropriate, to ensure the Criminal Code provision has its intended impact of ending such crimes being perpetrated against girls in Canada; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than December 31, 2023, and that the committee retain all powers necessary to publicize its findings for 180 days after the tabling of the final report.—(Honourable Senator Lankin, P.C.)

No. 77. (four)

October 26, 2022—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Bellemare, seconded by the Honourable Senator Harder, P.C.:

That a Special Senate Committee on Human Capital and the Labour Market be appointed until the end of the current session, to which may be referred matters relating to human capital, labour markets, and employment generally;

That the committee be composed of nine members, to be nominated by the Committee of Selection, and that four members constitute a quorum; and

That the committee be empowered to inquire into and report on such matters as may be referred to it by the Senate; to send for persons, papers and records; to hear witnesses and to publish such papers and evidence from day to day as may be ordered by the committee.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 82. (ten)

April 27, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Tannas, seconded by the Honourable Senator Osler:

That the Standing Senate Committee on National Security, Defence and Veterans Affairs be authorized to examine and report on the operation, applicability, and functionality of the Emergencies Act in a modern context, as well as the robustness of parliamentary supervision it provides for and its interaction with the rules and procedures of the Senate; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than September 28, 2023.—(Honourable Senator Tannas)

No. 96. (thirteen)

February 14, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McCallum, seconded by the Honourable Senator Campbell:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Indigenous Peoples be authorized to examine and report on the misrepresentation of Indigenous ancestry, inadequate self-identification standards and the profound effects that such identity fraud has on further marginalizing Indigenous people, in particular Indigenous women; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than December 31, 2023.—(Honourable Senator Housakos)

No. 107. (fourteen)

September 28, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Deacon (Nova Scotia), seconded by the Honourable Senator Smith:

That the Senate call on the Government of Canada to replace its outdated program delivery and information technology systems by urgently accelerating the implementation of user-friendly, digital solutions that transform the public service delivery experience of Canadians, and ultimately reduce the cost of program delivery.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 139. (one)

December 15, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Ataullahjan, seconded by the Honourable Senator Marshall:

That the Senate call on the Government of Canada to recognize the erasure of Afghan women and girls from public life as gender apartheid.—(Honourable Senator Patterson)

No. 147. (six)

October 19, 2023—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Seidman:

That the Senate take note of:

(a)the deteriorating humanitarian crisis occurring in Nagorno-Karabakh as a result of Azerbaijan’s ongoing blockade of the Lachin corridor and increased military aggression against indigenous Armenian civilians in the region; and

(b)the actions of the Aliyev regime as being dictatorial, and in violation of international law; and

That the Senate call on the Government of Canada:

(a)to support the liberty of the people of Nagorno-Karabakh and their right to self-determination;

(b)to immediately impose sanctions against the Azeri regime;

(c)to demand the immediate reopening of the Lachin corridor and the release of Armenian Prisoners of War;

(d)to provide a significant aid package through NGOs to those Armenian people forcefully displaced from their indigenous land; and

(e)to protect the Armenian people of Nagorno-Karabakh through the presence of international peacekeeping forces.—(Honourable Senator Petitclerc)

No. 172. (eight)

February 27, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Simons, seconded by the Honourable Senator Greenwood:

That the Senate of Canada:

1.call on the Chief Actuary within the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions to publish an actuarial study that reports on:

(a)a possible exit of Alberta from the Canada Pension Plan (CPP), including an analysis of the viability of the CPP after such an exit by Alberta;

(b)a reasonable estimate of an exit cost of Alberta’s share of the Canada Pension Plan fund; and

(c)any other information that the Chief Actuary deems to be relevant in the study of this issue; and

2.call on the Office of the Parliamentary Budget Officer to study a possible exit of Alberta from the CPP, including any fiscal and/or economic impacts of such an exit from the CPP on Canadians.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 181. (three)

April 16, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Housakos, seconded by the Honourable Senator Dalphond:

That the Senate take note:

(a)of the data from Statistics Canada and Jewish organizations such as the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs, Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Centre and B’nai Brith indicating a shocking rise in antisemitic incidents across Canada over the past years;

(b)of a global surge in antisemitism, to which Canada has not been immune, since the October 7 terrorist attack by Hamas and Israel’s duty to respond to it;

(c)that since October 2023, Canada’s Jewish community has witnessed shots fired at its schools, arson attempts at its communal buildings, boycott efforts and vandalism targeting private businesses, simply because their owners are Jewish, and the intimidation of its students at universities;

(d)that police departments across the country all report major and unprecedented increases in hate crimes since October 2023, with the Jewish community being by far the most targeted;

(e)that the Government of Canada has appointed Deborah Lyons, Canada’s former Ambassador to Israel, as the new Special Envoy on Preserving Holocaust Remembrance and Combatting Antisemitism;

(f)that the authority vested in the Special Envoy’s office permits her to be uniquely placed to convene and chair a second national summit to combat antisemitism; and

(g)that a second national summit to combat antisemitism would provide a valuable forum for stakeholders representing all levels of government, civil servants, law enforcement agencies, educators and community leaders to share information and agree on effective strategies to blunt the unprecedented wave of hate aimed at Jews; and

That the Senate urge the Government of Canada to direct the Special Envoy on Preserving Holocaust Remembrance and Combatting Antisemitism to convene a second national summit to combat antisemitism.—(Honourable Senator Dalphond)

No. 187. (one)

May 21, 2024—Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Martin, seconded by the Honourable Senator Seidman:

That the Senate recognize the month of October, each and every year, as Korean Heritage Month, given the contributions that Korean Canadians have made to Canadian society, the deep-rooted friendship and bilateral ties between Canada and Korea, and the importance of Korean heritage and culture within the fabric of Canadian society.—(Honourable Senator Martin)


Inquiries

No. 1. (fourteen)

June 2, 2022—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Dasko, calling the attention of the Senate to the role of leaders’ debates in enhancing democracy by engaging and informing voters.—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 3. (six)

December 9, 2021—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Boyer, calling the attention of the Senate to the positive contributions and impacts that Métis, Inuit, and First Nations have made to Canada, and the world.—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 4. (three)

March 3, 2022—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Coyle, calling the attention of the Senate to the importance of finding solutions to transition Canada’s society, economy and resource use in pursuit of a fair, prosperous, sustainable and peaceful net-zero emissions future for our country and the planet.—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 5. (four)

December 2, 2021—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Harder, P.C., calling the attention of the Senate to the role and mandate of the RCMP, the skills and capabilities required for it to fulfill its role and mandate, and how it should be organized and resourced in the 21st century.—(Honourable Senator Busson)

No. 8.

November 22, 2022—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Plett, calling the attention of the Senate to the impact on Canada’s public finances of the NDP-Liberal agreement entitled Delivering for Canadians Now, A Supply and Confidence Agreement.—(Honourable Senator Plett)

No. 10. (one)

October 18, 2022—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Boniface, calling the attention of the Senate to intimate partner violence, especially in rural areas across Canada, in response to the coroner’s inquest conducted in Renfrew County, Ontario.—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 12. (ten)

October 4, 2023—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Manning, calling the attention of the Senate to the life of Gordon Pinsent.—(Honourable Senator Manning)

No. 13. (two)

May 2, 2023—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Klyne, calling the attention of the Senate to the ongoing business and economic contributions made by Indigenous businesses to Canada’s economy.—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 14.

October 17, 2023—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Duncan, calling the attention of the Senate to the one hundred and twenty-fifth anniversary of the Yukon Act, an Act of Parliament adopted on June 13, 1898.—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 16. (six)

October 5, 2023—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Black, calling the attention of the Senate to the ongoing concerns with respect to Canadian agricultural, wetland, and forest land reallotments, as well as potential food, economic, and social insecurities as a result of reduced capacity for farming, pasture, forestry, and food production both domestically and internationally.—(Honourable Senator Clement)

No. 17. (one)

November 2, 2023—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson, calling the attention of the Senate to the life of the late Honourable Ian Shugart, P.C.—(Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson)

No. 19. (twelve)

February 8, 2024—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson, calling the attention of the Senate to the life and career of the late Honourable Ed Broadbent, P.C.—(Honourable Senator LaBoucane-Benson)

No. 20. (ten)

February 15, 2024—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Cardozo, calling the attention of the Senate to the Canadian flag as part of celebrating National Flag of Canada Day.—(Honourable Senator White)

No. 21. (three)

April 16, 2024—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Omidvar, calling the attention of the Senate to the courage, bravery and sacrifice of Alexei Navalny and other political prisoners persecuted by Putin’s Russia.—(Honourable Senator Martin)

No. 22. (one)

May 21, 2024—Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Cardozo, calling the attention of the Senate to the future of the CBC/Radio-Canada.—(Honourable Senator White)


Other

Nil


Notice Paper

Motions

No. 90. (thirteen)

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 29, 2022—That the Standing Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade be authorized to examine and report on foreign influence in the electoral process in Canada; and

That the committee submit its final report no later than June 30, 2023.

No. 169.

By the Honourable Senator Bellemare:

December 5, 2023—That the Senate call upon the federal government to create, under the auspices of the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, a working group to examine and report on issues of efficiency and equity related to federal, provincial and territorial strategies to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the agricultural sector, including but not limited to:

(a)the federal carbon tax exemption for fuels such as diesel and gasoline for farm machinery;

(b)the broadening of this exemption to propane and natural gas for farm machinery used to heat or cool a structure for raising or housing animals or growing crops, as well as for grain drying and storage;

(c)the identification of complementary solutions for the reduction of GHG emissions emanating from the use of fossil fuels in the agricultural sector; and

(d)a proposal for the creation of a permanent round table with economic stakeholders and provincial and territorial representatives from the agricultural sector, whose mandate is to advise the federal minister to ensure the adoption of federal policies that complement those of the provinces and territories, are fair and effective, and aim for carbon neutrality;

That the Senate recommend that the working group be composed of five representatives from the provinces and territories, one representative from the federal government, three academic or other experts in the agricultural sector and GHG emissions, and one representative from the Senate and one representative from the House of Commons who will co-chair its proceedings; and

That the Minister cause the working group’s report to be tabled in the two Houses of Parliament no later than June 1, 2024

No. 201.

By the Honourable Senator Harder, P.C.:

May 23, 2024—That the Senate express the view that it should not adopt any bill that contains a declaration pursuant to section 33 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, commonly known as the “notwithstanding clause.”

No. 202.

By the Honourable Senator Dalphond:

May 23, 2024—That the Senate take note:

(a)that Islamophobia includes racism, stereotypes, prejudice, systemic racism, fear or acts of hostility directed towards individual Muslims or followers of Islam in general;

(b)that hatred and discrimination have no place in Canada;

(c)that on November 30, 2023, the Senate unanimously adopted the sixth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights, including 13 recommendations, entitled Combatting Hate: Islamophobia and its impact on Muslims in Canada;

(d)that despite their rich and varied contributions to Canadian society, Muslims are often unfairly vilified and marginalized;

(e)that Islamophobia has motivated violent attacks on Muslim communities in recent years in Edmonton, Saskatoon, Mississauga, London, Quebec City and Toronto;

(f)that the National Council of Canadian Muslims reports a disturbing increase in the number of hate incidents since October 2023; and

(g)that in addition to Islamophobia, incidents of anti-Arab racism have been reported to the police and other public institutions;

That the Senate condemn Islamophobia and anti-Arab racism, reaffirm the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms value of equality, and the recommendations of the sixth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights, and denounce discrimination based on religion and other Charter-protected grounds; and

That the Senate call on the Government of Canada to fulfill its commitments made in its response, tabled in the Senate on April 26, 2024, to the sixth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights and to consider convening, when appropriate, a second national summit to combat Islamophobia, in consultation with Canada’s Special Representative on Combatting Islamophobia.


Inquiries

No. 18.

By the Honourable Senator Omidvar:

November 28, 2023—That she will call the attention of the Senate to the contributions of international students in Canada and the various challenges, such as fraud and physical, emotional, and sometimes sexual abuse, that many of them face.


Written Questions

Pursuant to rule 4-9(3), all unanswered written questions appear in the printed edition of the Order Paper and Notice Paper (OPNP) of the first sitting day of each week and in the electronic version of the OPNP of each sitting day, until the earlier of the following:

(a)an answer is tabled;

(b)a written explanation why an answer has not been provided is tabled;

(c)the question is withdrawn; or

(d)the expiration of the 60-day period provided for in this rule for an answer or explanation.

The 60-day period begins with the date indicated beside a question in the list below, which marks the date it first appeared in the OPNP. Since the OPNP is prepared immediately after a sitting, the list of questions reflects the situation at the end of the sitting preceding the date appearing on the front cover.

Pursuant to the order adopted by the Senate on May 8, 2024, the application of rule 4-9(6) to questions published prior to May 8, 2024, comes into effect on November 8, 2024. Rule 4-9(5) does not apply to these questions.

No. 1.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the 5G security review:

1.According to public statements made by former Minister Ralph Goodale, the current government has been conducting a review of whether to allow Huawei to join Canada’s 5G network since at least September 2018. On what date did the 5G security review formally begin?

2.Which departments, agencies or other entities of the Government of Canada have been involved in this review since 2018?

3.How many full-time equivalents have been assigned to this review since it began?

4.How much funding has been allocated to this review since it began?

5.When is the review expected to be completed?

6.Have any preliminary reports or findings on this matter been provided to any government Minister? If so, on which date, and in which department or agency?

7.Will a final report be submitted? If so, who will receive it, and will it be publicly available, in whole or in part?

No. 5.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB):

An answer provided to Order Paper question No. 114 in the 43rd Parliament, received on March 17, 2021 stated: “…Canadian companies have directly benefited economically from the AIIB. We are aware of three Canadian firms having signed contracts as part of the AIIB’s corporate procurement since Canada officially joined the AIIB in March 2018. In 2018, Hatch provided consulting services on an AIIB-financed project in Uzbekistan. In 2019, Edmonton-based Insignia Software Corporation provided library management system services to the institution. In 2020, EQ Consulting Inc. was awarded two separate contracts by the AIIB for the implementation of market risk tools and order management systems support.”

1.How many jobs were created in Canada through Hatch providing consulting services on an AIIB-financed project in Uzbekistan? How many of these were middle-class jobs?

2.How many jobs were created in Canada through Insignia Software Corporation providing library management system services to the institution? How many of these were middle-class jobs?

3.How many jobs were created in Canada through EQ Consulting Inc. being awarded two contracts for the AIIB for the implementation of market risk tools and order management systems support? How many of these were middle-class jobs?

4.Have any other AIIB contracts been awarded to Canadian companies since the original answer was provided? If so, what are they, and how many middle-class jobs in Canada did they create?

5.The answer stated: “In September 2020, the AIIB also collaborated with the Canadian Embassy in Beijing to organize an informational webinar for Canadian companies to introduce them to the Bank and potential business opportunities.” How many Canadian businesses were awarded contracts with the AIIB following this webinar? How many middle-class jobs in Canada were created as a result?

6.The answer also states: “The AIIB’s Treasury Department has also worked with Canadian financial institutions, such as TD, BMO, RBC and Scotiabank, as part of its funding program. The AIIB is also working with Canadian regulators and legal advisors towards its first issuance on the Canadian fixed income market (known as the “Maple Bond” market).” How many Canadian businesses were awarded contracts with the AIIB as part of this initiative? How many middle-class jobs in Canada were created as a result?

No. 6.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the Government of Canada’s $5.9 billion financial support agreement with Air Canada announced on April 12, 2021:

1.During its negotiations with Air Canada, did the Government of Canada ask Air Canada to disclose information regarding bonuses, share appreciation units, or other compensation paid to executives and management during the COVID-19 pandemic? If not, why not?

2.Did Air Canada provide this information to the Government of Canada? If so, when, and which department(s)/Minister’s office(s) received this information?

No. 10.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding Governor in Council (GIC) Appointments:

1.Could the Government of Canada provide a list of all GIC appointments for each province and territory from October 2015 to date, including the name of the appointee, the appointment received, and the length of the term?

2.Currently, how many vacancies are there in GIC appointed positions, and what is the percentage of vacancies compared to the total number of GIC positions?

No. 11.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding Ministerial Appointments:

Could the Government of Canada provide a list of all Ministerial appointments for each province and territory from November 2016 to date, including the name of the appointee, the appointment received, and the length of the term?

No. 16.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF):

Prior to agreeing to settle class-action lawsuits alleging sexual harassment in the Canada Armed Forces, in late 2017 the federal government argued in a court filing to strike the proceedings that it did not “owe a private law duty of care to individual members within the CAF to provide a safe and harassment-free work environment, or to create policies to prevent sexual harassment or sexual assault.” The federal government also argued it had no duty “to create policies to prevent sexual harassment or sexual assault which are already prohibited by the Canadian Human Rights Act.”

1.When was the former Minister of National Defence and/or his office made aware this argument would be made to the court?

2.When was the Prime Minister and/or his office made aware this argument would be made to the court?

3.Was this class-action lawsuit ever discussed before the former Cabinet Committee on Litigation Management? If so, on which dates?

4.Why did the federal government believe these arguments were justified in 2017, especially given that Operation Honour was initiated in 2015?

No. 22.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the Department of National Defence (DND):

1.On what date in 2018 did the annual performance reviews for the Department of National Defence’s Order in Council appointments begin and on what date did they end? When did the annual performance review for the then-Chief of Defence Staff General Jonathan Vance begin and when did it end?

2.What was the approval process surrounding the pay raise for the Chief of Defence Staff in 2018? Did this process differ from any other process surrounding pay increases for the department’s other Order in Council appointments that year? If so, how was it different?

3.Were National Defence and the Privy Council Office the only two departments of the Government of Canada involved in this process in 2018? If not, which other departments were involved?

4.Did all of DND’s Order in Council appointments receive increases to their base salary and/or performance or “at risk” pay following their performance review in 2018? How many did not receive such increases?

No. 28.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the Government of Canada’s COVID-19 emergency response programs:

1.How much has been spent to date by each government department or agency on external consultants in relation to its COVID-19 emergency response programs?

2.For related contracts in each department or agency, please provide:

(a)The name of the recipient firm or individual of a related contract

(b)The amount of the contract(s)

(c)The date the contract began and ended, and

(d)A summary of the work provided under the contract.

No. 38.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding classified or protected documents:

1.Across the Government of Canada, from January 1, 2020 to date, how many documents have been handled or stored in a manner which did not meet the requirements of the document’s security level?

2.Which government departments or agencies have seen the most incidents of improperly handled or stored documents from January 1, 2020 to date?

3.Have any security clearances been revoked in relation to the treatment of these documents from January 1, 2020 to date? If so, how many?

4.What guidance regarding the treatment of documents has been given to public servants working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic?

5.How do government agencies and departments conduct security checks to monitor the proper handling of documents remotely?

6.Have any “Protected C”, “Confidential”, “Secret”, and “Top Secret” documents been worked on from home during the COVID-19 pandemic? If so, how many, and from which departments or agencies?

No. 39.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding government advertising:

1.Since April 2018, how much have Government of Canada departments and agencies spent on Facebook and Instagram advertising, promotions, and sponsored posts and videos?

2.How is this spending broken down by government department and agency?

3.How much have Government of Canada departments and agencies spent on Facebook and Instagram advertising, promotions, and sponsored posts and videos specifically related to the COVID-19 pandemic?

4.How much has the Government of Canada collected in GST from Facebook and Instagram ads on these platforms since 2019?

No. 45.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding newspaper articles written by government departments and agencies:

1.In both 2020 and to date in 2021, how much did the Government of Canada pay to publish news articles written by government employees?

2.Which departments or agencies paid for the distribution of these articles, and how much in total did they spend?

3.In which newspapers did these articles appear?

No. 46.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding harassment complaints across the Government of Canada:

1.How many workplace harassment complaints were lodged across Government of Canada departments, agencies, or other entities in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 and to date in 2021?

2.How many of these complaints completed all five steps in the harassment complaint process in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 and to date in 2021 (acknowledging receipt, reviewing the complaint, exploring options, rendering a decision and notifying in writing, and restoring the well-being of the workplace)?

3.Which departments, agencies, or other entities were among the top five across the Government of Canada for harassment complaints lodged in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 and to date in 2021?

4.Across the Government of Canada, how many cases of assault subject to the Criminal Code, including sexual assault and criminal harassment, were referred to the appropriate authorities in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 and to date in 2021?

5.How much was paid out in settlements across Government of Canada departments, agencies or other entities in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 and to date in 2021?

6.How many individuals received these settlements in 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 and to date in 2021?

No. 47.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the residences situated at Harrington Lake:

1.When was the “Caretaker’s House”, originally built in 1850, moved and renamed the “Farmhouse”?

2.Was the Prime Minister, the Prime Minister’s Office and/or the Privy Council Office involved in the decision to move the Caretaker’s House?

3.What are the detailed costs of moving the Caretaker’s House and renovating the Farmhouse?

4.What is the budget for renovating the main cottage?

5.What is the timeline to complete the renovations?

No. 55.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding Government of Canada contracts:

1.Since 2016, how many departments, agencies or other entities of the Government of Canada have entered into partnerships or awarded contracts to social media influencers or digital influencers for sponsored content?

2.For each of these contracts or partnerships, could the government provide the following?

(a)Date

(b)Amount

(c)Start and end date of the contract

(d)Description of goods or services provided

(e)Whether the contract was sole-sourced or tendered

(f)Whether the contract specified if the content must be identified as sponsored

3.What is the total value of all contracts or partnerships entered into with social media influencers or digital influencers since 2016?

No. 62.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the Large Employer Emergency Financing Facility (LEEFF):

1.How many companies and industry associations have contacted Minister’s offices and/or departments identifying problems with/requesting changes to the LEEFF? In particular, how many have contacted the following Ministers and/or their offices/departments since the LEEFF was launched?

(a)Prime Minister

(b)Deputy Prime Minister

(c)Minister of Finance

(d)Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry

(e)Minister of Transport

(f)Minister of Natural Resources

2.Could the government break down the number of companies and industry associations which contacted the Government of Canada regarding changes to the LEEF by each economic sector listed below?

(a)Aerospace

(b)Airlines

(c)Manufacturing

(d)Oil and Gas

(e)Retail

(f)Tourism/Hospitality

3.How many applications did the LEEFF program receive?

No. 76.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding government contracts:

In Spring 2019, the Privy Council Office gave two sole-sourced contracts to WE Charity.

The first contract (Procurement Identification Number 8040926) from March 19th to March 31st was for $17,050.34. The information in the government’s contracts database states that it was for “Other professional services not elsewhere specified” and “Honoraria”.

The second contract (Procurement Identification Number 6026849) for “management consulting” was worth $24,996.00, just a few dollars under the threshold to advertise the contract for tendering. The contract ran from May 1st to May 3rd, 2019 and some of the only information about this contract in the database states: “conference/workshop services”.

1.Could the government please provide the following information on these two contracts:

(a)Who authorized these contracts?

(b)What were these contracts for?

(c)What work was provided?

(d)What was the location where the work was provided?

(e)Who received the money?

(f)Why were these contracts sole sourced instead of tendered?

2.With respect to PCO contract 8040926, no individual’s name was attached to this contract, as is the case with other “Honoraria” contracts in the government’s database. Why?

No. 77.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the Privy Council Office (PCO):

In January 2016, Mr. Matthew Mendelsohn was appointed Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet (Results and Delivery) in the Privy Council Office. On March 4, 2020, the Prime Minister announced Mr. Mendelsohn had stepped down from his position.

1.What was Mr. Mendelsohn’s salary or salary range?

2.Did Mr. Mendelsohn receive severance pay or any amount after leaving his position?

3.Who replaced Mr. Mendelsohn as Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet (Results and Delivery)?

4.How many PCO employees were assigned to Results and Delivery between January 2016 and March 2020?

5.What results were delivered by the Results and Delivery section of the Privy Council Office between January 2016 and March 2020?

No. 78.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the Privy Council Office (PCO):

1.When did PCO’s Security Operations Division begin its investigation of the leak to former CBC journalist James Cudmore of Cabinet deliberations and decisions regarding the interim supply ships? When did PCO’s Security Operations Division end this investigation?

2.Were any outside investigators hired to assist in this PCO probe? If so, how many, and at what cost? What were the total costs associated with this investigation?

3.How many individuals were interviewed during the course of this investigation? Could a list of their names be provided?

4.Who received the final report from PCO’s Security Operations Division regarding this investigation? When was it submitted? Did PCO’s Security Operations Division recommend asking the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) to investigate the leak?

5.On what date was the RCMP asked to investigate the leak? How was the request made, and who made the request?

6.How many investigations into leaks from Cabinet or any other government leaks have been conducted by PCO’s Security Operations Division since 2016?

(a)Was it asked to investigate the leak surrounding the judicial selection process of the 2017 Supreme Court appointment?

(b)Was it asked to investigate the leak of Statistics Canada’s labour force survey for April 2020?

No. 79.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the public service:

In 2018, changes to the rules surrounding performance pay for Governor-in-Council (GIC) appointees stated any performance pay and associated compensation could be clawed back if the appointee is found to have committed serious breaches of conduct or mismanagement in their annual performance review, or “willfully or recklessly” sought to hide or misrepresent their achievements such that any deficiencies would have been difficult to detect at the time of review.

1.Since 2018, how much performance pay and associated compensation has been recouped by the Government of Canada as a result of this policy change in the Performance Management Program?

2.How is the amount recouped broken down by the following categories?

(a)Performance Pay

(b)Bonuses

(c)In-range Increases

(d)Re-calculation of Pension Entitlements

3.From how many GIC appointees was this pay recouped?

4.How many GIC appointees received ratings of “did not meet” for performance reviews in 2016-17, 2017-18, 2018-19, 2019-20, and 2020-21?

5.What is the process for determining if a GIC appointee has willfully or recklessly sought to hide or misrepresent their achievements such that any deficiencies would have been difficult to detect at the time of the performance evaluation? How many of these processes have taken place to date?

No. 86.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the National Capital Commission:

1.Since October 2, 2017, how much has the National Capital Commission spent on renovations at Rideau Hall carried out at the request of former Governor General Julie Payette and/or her office? What is the breakdown of these renovation projects and their costs?

2.Were these renovation projects completed by January 21, 2021, when the former Governor General resigned? If not, how many were not concluded, and what is their current status?

3.How many nights did the former Governor General spend at Rideau Hall during her tenure?

No. 89.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the Advisory Board for Senate Appointments:

1. The most recent report on the Board’s website is its Spring 2018 (April 2018 to September 2018) report. Has the Board submitted any reports on its work to the Government of Canada since this report was submitted on December 5, 2018?

2. If the Board has submitted reports to the Government of Canada since December 2018:

(a) How many reports were submitted, and when?

(b) Who received the reports?

(c) Why weren’t they made public?

(d) Who made the decision not to publicly release the reports?

3. If the Board has not submitted reports to the Government of Canada since December 2018:

(a) When was this decision made?

(b) Who made this decision?

(c) What was the basis for this decision?

4. The Spring 2018 report states: “A total of 11 deliberation meetings were held for the Spring 2018 cycle.” How many deliberation meetings have been held by the Board since the Spring 2018 cycle?

5. The Spring 2018 report states: “Expenses for the Spring 2018 cycle are still being processed. Estimated costs are in the range of $550,000”. What was the total amount spent for the Spring 2018 cycle?

6. What is the total amount spent by the Advisory Board for Senate Appointments since its establishment? How much has been spent annually since its establishment and what is the breakdown of these expenses, including the amount spent on per diems and the amount spent on travel expenditures for in-person meetings?

No. 90.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments:

On March 9, 2020, Order in Council 2020-0120 re-appointed “Vianne Timmons, O.C., of Regina, Saskatchewan, as a special adviser to the Prime Minister, to serve as an ad hoc provincial member of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments, to hold office during pleasure for a term ending on April 30, 2020.”

1.Why did the government re-appoint Dr. Timmons as a Saskatchewan member of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments when the Board of Regents of Memorial University of Newfoundland announced in December 2019 that Dr. Timmons would become its president and vice-chancellor, effective April 1, 2020?

2.Are provincial members of the Independent Advisory Board for Senate Appointments required to be residents of the province they represent? If not, why not? How many other provincial members of the Advisory Board are not residents of the province they represent?

3.According to the government’s Senate appointments website, applications are only supposed to be retained for two years. Have there been instances where a list older than two years has been used to fill a Senate seat for any province? If so, how many? When was the last list for the province of Saskatchewan submitted?

No. 91.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the 2019 Economic and Fiscal Update:

Page 23 of the 2019 Economic and Fiscal Update, released on December 16, 2019 states: “The Government will also launch the first phase of a comprehensive review of government spending and tax expenditures, to ensure that resources are efficiently allocated to continue to invest in people and keep the economy strong and growing. This review will result in $1.5 billion in annual savings, starting in 2020-21.”

1.Which person, group or department within the Government of Canada was designated as the lead for this comprehensive review?

2.Were any contracts signed with outside consultants in relation to this review? If so, how many? Which departments authorized these contracts? Which consultants received contracts? How were these consultants chosen? How much were the contracts worth?

3.Has this comprehensive review since been abandoned? If so, when was it abandoned? If not, what departments and/or programs have been targeted for the first phase of the review?

4.If this review has not been abandoned, are all types of government spending being reviewed, or just operating spending?

5.If this review has not been abandoned, are tax policies currently under consideration? If so, which ones?

6.If the review has not been abandoned, does the Government of Canada still maintain that it will result in $1.5 billion in annual savings? If this target amount has been revised, what is it?

No. 92.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey:

Statistics Canada’s Labour Force Survey (LFS) for April 2020 was leaked to a media outlet, which publicized the numbers over half an hour before their official release. When a Statistics Canada investigation into the leak was announced, former Finance Minister Bill Morneau said: “We will be leaving no stone unturned” and “We need to make sure that information that’s important like this, that can be market moving is kept confidential right up until the time that it is released publicly.”

1.A report dated June 5, 2020, on the investigation into this leak led by the Audit and Evaluation branch of Statistics Canada concluded: “Based on the investigation and review of results, there is no evidence that Bloomberg obtained Labour Force Survey pre-release information from Statistics Canada personnel, nor as a result of a technical error.” Has this incident been further investigated by any of the organizations and/or responsible Minister’s office which received the advance release of the April 2020 LFS?

(a)Finance Canada

(b)Employment and Social Development Canada

(c)Privy Council Office

(d)Bank of Canada

(e)Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada

2.Regarding investigations conducted by the five organizations listed above:

(a)On what date did the investigation begin?

(b)Is the investigation still ongoing? If so, when is it expected to conclude?

(c)If the investigation has concluded:

(i)When did it end?

(ii)Has a final report been submitted regarding this investigation? If so, when, and who received it? What were its findings?

(d)Were any outside investigators hired to assist in the investigation?

(i)If so, how many?

(ii)If so, what was the cost?

(e)How many individuals were interviewed during the investigation? Could a list of their names be provided?

(f)How many email records were analyzed during the investigation?

(g)How many telephone account logs were reviewed during the investigation?

(h)Was blame assigned to any individual, office, or department for the LFS leak, as a result of the investigation or by any other means? If so, who was found to be ultimately responsible for the leak? Was any sanction applied as a result?

3.After the leak, Statistics Canada suspended the pre-release of LFS information to government officials.

(a)Has this practice since resumed?

(b)If not, is it expected to resume?

(c)If so, when did it resume?

(d)If so, has it resumed for all five organizations who previously received this information?

(e)If so, were any new or enhanced security measures attached to providing advance notice of this information to government officials?

4.Statistics Canada’s report into their investigation noted: “On April 7, 2020, pre-release access to the LFS estimates was granted by authorization of the Clerk of the Privy Council on the recommendation of the Chief Statistician to two additional departments: Bank of Canada and Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada.” Why did the former Clerk of the Privy Council authorize these two entities to have access to the pre-release of the LFS?

5.Is the Government of Canada embarrassed that it did not have the integrity to keep this information secure?

No. 95.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 23, 2021—Regarding the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project:

1.Question No. 56 on the Order Paper in the 43rd Parliament asked how many investors had expressed interest in purchasing Trans Mountain in June 2018. An answer from the Department of Finance stated: “Due to commercial confidentiality, the Government cannot state the names of the companies involved in the 2018 process.” The question did not ask for the names of companies; it asked for a number. How many investors expressed interest in purchasing Trans Mountain in June 2018, as the former Minister of Finance indicated at the time?

2.Trans Mountain Pipeline LP has said that in 2020, it “…experienced a significant reduction in available insurance capacity” and that “(i)t sought and secured partial replacement policies to compensate for this reduction, but did so at a significantly higher cost.” What was the “significantly higher” cost of Trans Mountain’s increased insurance costs in 2020?

No. 115.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 8, 2022—Regarding the Department of Finance Canada:

Conservative MP Larry Maguire’s Private Member’s Bill C-208 was passed by the Senate and received royal assent in June 2021.

1.On June 17, 2021, during debate on C-208 in the Senate, Senator Marc Gold, Leader of the Government in the Senate, stated: “…these are serious tax-avoidance opportunities that will come at a significant cost to the fiscal framework which the government has already carefully plotted out in Budget 2021. In short, Bill C-208 would provide considerable benefits to some taxpayers in the form of tax-free distributions of corporate surplus without adequately ensuring that a genuine intergenerational business transfer has occurred.” Did the Department of Finance provide any information or data to Senator Gold in preparation for his speech? If so, what information or data?

2.Does the Department of Finance support the claims made by Senator Gold in his June 17, 2021 speech?

3.On June 17, 2021, during debate on C-208 in the Senate, Senator Yuen Pau Woo, who was defending the position of the federal government, stated: “This bill will open tax avoidance opportunities.” Did the Department of Finance provide any information or data to Senator Woo in preparation for his speech? If so, what information or data?

4.Does the Department of Finance support the claims made by Senator Woo in his June 17, 2021 speech?

5.On June 22, 2021, during debate on C-208 in the Senate, Senator Pierre Dalphond, who was defending the position of the federal government, stated: “The lack of proper safeguards as they exist in the Quebec framework is made more concerning by the fact that Bill C-208 will come into force immediately. In other words, there is no transition period contemplated to allow the Canada Revenue Agency to adapt to this new reality, to issue any forms needed or to train its employees.” Did the Department of Finance provide any information or data to Senator Dalphond in preparation for his speech? If so, what information or data?

6.Does the Department of Finance support the claims made by Senator Dalphond in his June 22, 2021 speech?

7.On June 22, 2021, during debate on C-208 in the Senate, Senator Peter Harder, who was defending the position of the federal government, stated: “…the bill becomes a substantial fiscal cost to the Government of Canada. The Parliamentary Budget Officer has spoken of earlier contributions and estimated the cost at half a billion dollars four years ago. Combined with behavioural responses as more tax firms offer this product, I can only assume that this number will be much exceeded should this bill be adopted.” Did the Department of Finance provide any information or data to Senator Harder in preparation for his speech? If so, what information or data?

8.Does the Department of Finance support the claims made by Senator Harder in his June 22, 2021 speech?

9.A Department of Finance press release issued on June 30, 2021 stated: “The government proposes to introduce legislation to clarify that these amendments would apply at the beginning of the next taxation year, starting on January 1, 2022.” Regarding this press release:

(a)Has the Department received any legal notice(s) confirming that it may, by press release, decide on the effective date of a bill that has received Royal Assent? If so, from whom? Can the Department provide a copy of the legal opinion(s)?

(b)Did the Minister of Finance authorize this press release? If not, who is the person with the highest level of authority in the Department who authorized the release?

10.On July 19, 2021, the Department of Finance issued another press release rescinding the provisions of its June 30th release. It includes the following quote from the Minister of Finance: “Bill C-208 was voted on by Parliament and received Royal Assent. The law is the law.” Who decided to change the Department’s position on the coming into force of Bill C-208?

11.In the July 19, 2021 press release, the federal government “…is clarifying that it does intend to bring forward amendments to the Income Tax Act that honour the spirit of Bill C-208 while safeguarding against any unintended tax avoidance loopholes that may have been created by Bill C-208.” To date, no such amendments to the Income Tax Act have been introduced. Why? Can the federal government provide an estimate of the tax loss caused by its failure to protect itself against these “loopholes”?

No. 125.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 8, 2022—Regarding the Privy Council Office:

The Supplementary Estimates (A) 2020-21 contained $7,699,338 in voted funding “to support regional presence, stabilize and enhance PCO capacity and the transfer of exempt staff in Ministers’ Regional Offices.”

1.Was this entire amount expended? If not, how much was expended?

2.What is the detailed breakdown of how this funding was expended?

No. 147.

By the Honourable Senator Housakos:

March 30, 2022—Regarding government contracts:

Since March 2020, have any departments or agencies of the Government of Canada hired speakers, instructors, performers, or entertainment for virtual staff meetings? For related contracts in each department or agency, please provide:

(a)The name of the recipient firm or individual of a related contract;

(b)The amount of the contract(s);

(c)The date the contract began and ended; and

(d)A summary of the work or services provided under the contract.

No. 148.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 26, 2022—Concerning the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank:

1.Did the Government of Canada make a payment of US$39.8 million to the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank in March 2022? If so, on what date was this payment made?

2.Was this the final payment made to the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank by the Government of Canada? If not, what other payments are scheduled to take place, and when?

No. 160.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

May 5, 2022—Regarding dividends paid to the Government of Canada:

On March 24, 2022, the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) announced a dividend of $995 million to its shareholder (the Government of Canada) to be paid no later than April 30, 2022. CMHC stated: “By returning some excess capital to our shareholder, we enable the Government of Canada to use the funds to support Canadians where it is needed most.”

1.What happened to this dividend? Was it deposited into the Consolidated Revenue Fund of the Government of Canada?

2.Since CMHC began making dividend payments to its shareholder in 2017, how much has it provided in total to the Government of Canada? What has the government done with this money?

No. 166.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

June 2, 2022—Regarding Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada:

1.When did the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship and/or his office become aware of a “friendly” soccer match between Canada and Iran, originally scheduled to take place on June 5, 2022 in Vancouver?

2.Did the Minister and/or his office contact Canada Soccer regarding this match? If so, when did that occur? What message was communicated to Canada Soccer?

3.Did the Minister and/or his office provide direction to his department regarding this match? If so, when did that occur? What message or instructions were communicated to the department?

4.What assistance did the department of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada provide to Canada Soccer regarding this soccer match? On what date did this begin?

5.How many visas or work permits were requested in relation to this soccer match?

6.How many visas or work permits were processed in relation to this soccer match?

7.How many visas or work permits in relation to this soccer match were rejected on the grounds of ties to the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps?

No. 178.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 13, 2022—Concerning federal-provincial discussions:

1.Did the federal government hold any discussions with one or more provinces since 2019 on changes to the equalization program? If so, when and with whom? And are any discussions currently planned?

2.Did the federal government hold any discussions with one or more provinces since 2019 on changes to the economic stabilization program? If so, when and with whom? And are any discussions currently planned?

3.Did the federal government hold any discussions with one or more provinces since 2019 on reforms to the Senate of Canada? If so, when and with whom? And are any discussions currently planned?

No. 179.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 13, 2022—Regarding the 35% tariff rate on fertilizer originating from Russia or Belarus:

1.What is the total amount collected under this tariff since it was imposed in March 2022?

2.What is the breakdown of the amount collected by province?

3.What has been done with the funds collected through the tariff on fertilizer?

No. 183.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 13, 2022—Regarding the Rogers cell and internet service outage of July 8, 2022:

1.What federal government services were unavailable to Canadians during the outage?

2.How many passports were unable to be processed during the outage?

3.Have any federal departments or agencies entered into contracts with other suppliers to limit the damage to their operations in the event of another similar outage? If so, which ones, and with which internet service provider?

No. 184.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

December 13, 2022—Regarding the Task Force on Services to Canadians:

1.Since the Task Force on Services to Canadians was announced by the Prime Minister on June 25, 2022, how many times has it met, either virtually or in-person?

2.Did the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, and the Minister of Transport attend each of these meetings?

3.Approximately how much of the Task Force’s time in these meetings was spent on each of the following areas? Were any meetings dedicated solely to one of these areas?

(a)The delivery of passports

(b)Wait times for passengers at Canada’s airports

(c)The processing of immigration applications

4.What has the Task Force accomplished since it was announced, and how has this been measured?

No. 198.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 2, 2023—Regarding the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank:

1.Since 2016, how much money has the Government of Canada contributed to the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank?

2.How many middle-class jobs have been created in Canada as a result of Canada joining the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank? How is this number calculated?

No. 217.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 8, 2023—Regarding the Shared Equity Mortgage Providers Fund:

1.Since the Shared Equity Mortgage Providers Fund launched on July 31, 2019, how many new units have been completed?

(a)How does this break down by fiscal year?

(b)How does this break down by program stream (Preconstruction Loans — Stream 1 and Shared Equity Mortgages — Stream 2)?

2.Since the Shared Equity Mortgage Providers Fund launched on July 31, 2019, how many homebuyers were helped to buy their first home?

(a)How does this break down by fiscal year?

(b)How does this break down by program stream (Preconstruction Loans — Stream 1 and Shared Equity Mortgages — Stream 2)?

3.How much of the funds allocated to the Shared Equity Mortgage Providers Fund have been expended since its launch?

(a)How does this break down by fiscal year?

(b)How does this break down by program stream (Preconstruction Loans — Stream 1 and Shared Equity Mortgages — Stream 2)?

4.What has been the cost to date to administer the Shared Equity Mortgage Providers Fund?

No. 218.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 22, 2023—Regarding the 2018 report “Driving Change: Technology and the Future of the Automated Vehicle” from the Standing Senate Committee on Transport and Communications:

1.How has the Government of Canada worked to address each of the report’s recommendations?

2.The report noted that a committee witness told them Infrastructure Canada’s Smart Cities Challenge is a good way to encourage the early adoption or early pilot test of automated vehicles or connected vehicles. How much of the funds disbursed through the Smart Cities Challenge winners in 2019 went towards this work? What were the outcomes related to this funding?

3.What is the current status of the vehicle of the future advisory group, which was created in November 2018?

No. 220.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 22, 2023—Regarding foreign interference:

On March 11, 2023, Mr. Cheuk Kwan of the Toronto Association for Democracy in China said in an interview with CBC journalist Natasha Fatah: “We have collected the evidence in testimonies of harassment and intimidation. Our group, together with Amnesty International and other groups, have compiled this report since 2017. We submitted it to RCMP (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) and PMO (Prime Minister’s Office) but we have not heard anything from them. What we have been saying now is being corroborated by the CSIS leaks.”

1.Why didn’t the RCMP or PMO acknowledge receipt of this report at any point since it was submitted in 2017?

2.Did the PMO provide this report to any other departments or agencies of the Government of Canada? If not, why not? If so, which departments or agencies were provided the report? What actions were taken by these departments or agencies in response to the evidence provided in this report?

3.What action was taken by the RCMP on the information provided in this report? Did the RCMP investigate any of the report’s examples of harassment and intimidation of Chinese Canadians by the Beijing government?

No. 222.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 22, 2023—Regarding the Trans Mountain Corporation (TMC):

1.Since 2018, how much has the Trans Mountain Corporation paid out in each category?

(a)Termination benefits;

(b)Short-term incentive or performance benefits;

(c)Long-term incentive or performance benefits; and

(d)Any other discretionary bonuses.

2.What is the total amount TMC has paid out in all forms of compensation since 2018?

No. 223.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

March 30, 2023—Regarding the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF):

The Government of Canada has selected the F-35 as Canada’s next fighter aircraft. The government expects the first four aircraft to be delivered in 2026, and another 12 by 2028.

1.When is it anticipated that the first frontline squadron will enter full operational service?

2.When is it anticipated that all 88 aircraft will be delivered?

3.How many frontline squadrons will be deployed by the RCAF in total?

4.What is the anticipated schedule for standing up these squadrons?

5.The CF-18s are to be flown until 2032. What is the anticipated total cost of operating the CF-18s from 2022 to 2032?

6.What is the total number of pilots currently qualified to fly the CF-18 fighter in the RCAF? How many of these pilots are women? How many are visible minorities? How many are Indigenous?

7.How many CF-18 pilots left the RCAF between the start of 2020 and the end of 2022?

8.How many new individuals were trained to fly the CF-18 in the RCAF between the start of 2020 and the end of 2022?

9.Are changes anticipated in pilot requirements, and in particular the weight requirement, in order to safely wear the helmet that will be required to fly the F-35?

10.What is the average amount of time required to fully train a pilot to qualify for the CF-18? Please provide a breakdown of individual training courses from the start of primary, or initial, flight training to the end of conversion to the CF-18.

11.After selection and preliminary qualification, what is the current average wait time for pilot trainees for each of the required flight training courses required before a pilot is qualified on the CF-18?

No. 230.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

May 30, 2023—Regarding comments made by the Prime Minister:

In January 2017, in a town hall meeting, the Prime Minister answered a question about the issue of tolls on the Confederation Bridge. He said: “I will make sure I pass along your concerns to our Island MPs, and we will look at what can be done to make sure people are able to travel freely, travel efficiently and openly across the country at modest costs.”

1.Did the Prime Minister pass along those concerns to the Liberal Members of Parliament representing Prince Edward Island? If so, how and when?

2.Did the PEI Liberal MPs actually do anything about this issue?

3. Did the Prime Minister pass along those concerns about the cost of the toll on Confederation Bridge to one or more Ministers, who can actually act on this issue? If so, who are the Ministers, and when were they briefed?

4.What are the government’s plans to make sure Islanders “are able to travel freely, travel efficiently and openly across the country at modest costs”?

No. 236.

By the Honourable Senator Moodie:

June 21, 2023—Regarding the Calls to Action on combatting racism and advancing equity and inclusion within the Public Service by the Clerk of the Privy Council in January of 2021:

1.What percentage of appointments to and within the Executive group have gone to BIPOC candidates since the Calls to Action were released?

2.What percentage of interviews for Executive Group positions have gone to BIPOC candidates since the Calls to Action were released?

3.What percentage of applications for Executive Group positions have come from BIPOC candidates since the Calls to Action were released?

4.What has been done in concrete terms to provide better support to BIPOC employees in preparation for leadership roles?

5.How many BIPOC employees have been sponsored for leadership roles since the Calls to Action were released?

6.How many of those employees have actually gone on to leadership roles?

7.What measures have been adopted to increase participation by BIPOC employees in leadership development programs?

8.What has been done to make career development services more accessible to BIPOC employees?

9.By how much has the proportion of employees in those programs that are BIPOC increased since the Calls to Action were released?

10.What outreach programs have been created to attract more candidates from BIPOC communities to the public service?

11.What percentage of applicants for public service positions have been from BIPOC communities since these programs have started?

12.What percentage of interview offers have been given to BIPOC candidates since the programs have started?

13.Of those interviewed BIPOC candidates, how many were ultimately recruited to the public service?

14.What has been the overall success rate of BIPOC applicants in obtaining employment with the public service since the start of these programs?

15.How has the public service improved access to education about racism, reconciliation, accessibility, and inclusion?

16.How many public service leaders have taken advantage of these opportunities?

17.What feedback has the public service received from employees as to whether they feel the culture within the public service is improving?

18.What initiatives have been launched to encourage employees to speak up about bias and oppression in the public service?

19.What has ben done when reports of bias or oppression are received?

20.Has the public service received feedback from employees that they feel safer and more encouraged to bring forward issues of bias and oppression?

21.How has the public service endeavoured to increase grassroots networks’ access to resources and participation in senior executive decisions?

22.What grassroots networks have become involved through these processes?

23.What measures have been taken to encourage employees of diverse backgrounds to speak out against discrimination and barriers to inclusion?

24.What has been done to ensure those employees feel safe to do so?

25.What proactive efforts have been made to seek out diverse voices in the public service to speak on their experiences of systemic racism, discrimination, and barriers to inclusion?

26.How has the public service endeavoured to include diverse voices in the design and implementation of action to address these issues?

27.What statistics are being collected to measure the increase in BIPOC candidates recruited and promoted?

28.What statistics are being collected to measure public service employees’ overall feeling of comfort and security in bringing forth complaints of systemic racism, discrimination, bias, and oppression?

29.Can you provide any examples of actions being taken pursuant to concerns raised by the collection of this survey data?

30.Given the testimony heard at the Standing Committee on Human Rights that some racialized employees can be left behind when ‘visible minorities’ are aggregated together, is the public service pursuing the collection of disaggregated data to ensure these especially underrepresented minorities are accounted for?

No. 237.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 19, 2023—Regarding the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB):

On June 14, 2023, the Minister of Finance stated: “The Government of Canada will immediately halt all government-led activity at the Bank, and I have instructed the Department of Finance to lead an immediate review of the allegations raised and of Canada’s involvement in the AIIB.”

1.What specific government-led activity at the AIIB was halted by Canada? Does this activity remain halted, or has it resumed?

2.What is the current status of the Department of Finance review? What specific activity has this review entailed to date? How many Finance officials are working on this review? Has a report or recommendations been submitted to the Minister? If so, on what date did this take place?

3.On June 14, 2023, the Minister of Finance also stated: “The Government of Canada will also discuss this matter with our allies and partners who are members of the Bank.” How many members of the AIIB discussed this matter with the Government of Canada? Could the Government of Canada summarize the information or advice received from these members?

4.On June 14, 2023, the Minister of Finance stated that this review would be undertaken “expeditiously”. When is the review expected to be completed?

No. 238.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 19, 2023—Regarding the ArriveCAN app:

1.On January 23, 2023, the Prime Minister told reporters he asked the public service why his government paid over $8 million to a two-person company to sub-contract out the work of developing the ArriveCAN app. Was an answer provided to the Prime Minister? If so, what reason was given? If an answer was not provided to the Prime Minister, why not?

2.How many information technology workers does the Government of Canada employ? Could any of them have developed this app?

3.Why didn’t the Government of Canada deal directly with the developers of the ArriveCAN app?

4.How much has been spent in total to sub-contractors regarding the ArriveCAN app? For each related contract, please provide:

(a)The name of the recipient firm or individual;

(b)The amount of the contract(s);

(c)The date the contract began and ended; and

(d)A summary of the work provided under the contract.

5.How much has been spent in total on the ArriveCAN app? How much of this spending has occurred since October 1, 2022, when the use of ArriveCAN was no longer mandatory for travellers entering Canada?

6.In 2022, the Canada Border Services Agency said it would review why it told the House of Commons that the company ThinkOn worked on the app’s QR code scanning and received $1.2 million, when in fact this company was Microsoft. What did the review entail? Is it publicly available? Did the review find other mistakes? If so, what are they?

7.On January 23, 2023, the Prime Minister said: “I have made sure that the Clerk of the Privy Council is looking into procurement practices to make sure that we are getting value for money and that we are doing things in a smart and logical way.” Did the Clerk of the Privy Council look into procurement practices? If not, why not? If so, what was the outcome? Does the Clerk of the Privy Council believe this was an example of good value for money?

No. 240.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 19, 2023—Regarding Finance Canada:

1.For each budget handed down under the current government beginning with Budget 2016, how much was spent on the budget’s cover art? How is this spending broken down (including but not limited to talent fees, photo shoots, and outside consultants)?

2.For each budget handed down under the current government beginning with Budget 2016, how many hard copies of the budget did the government print?

No. 255.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 19, 2023—Regarding the Canada Growth Fund:

On December 7, 2022, the Minister of Finance told the Standing Senate Committee on National Finance: “We need to move really fast. Getting this fund in place quickly is more important than ever.”

1.As of July 2023, the Canada Development Investment Corporation’s (CDEV) website said: “More details will follow shortly.” If the government needed “to move really fast” on this Fund, why were no details provided for many months?

2.Why does the Canada Growth Fund’s Technical Backgrounder make no mention of the Public Sector Pension Investment Board’s involvement?

3.How many employees are currently assigned to work on the Canada Growth Fund?

4.Have any consultants been hired in relation to the Canada Growth Fund? If so, for each related contract, please provide:

(a)the name of the recipient firm or individual;

(b)the amount of the contract;

(c)the date the contract began and ended; and

(d)a summary of the work provided under the contract.

5.To date, how much has been spent in total in relation to the Canada Growth Fund? How is this spending broken down?

6.Canadians were told the Canada Growth Fund would begin investing in the first half of 2023. Did that occur? If not, what is the new target date for when the Canada Growth Fund will begin investing?

7.How much longer will the Canada Growth Fund be a subsidiary of CDEV?

8.When will a report into the Canada Growth Fund’s activities, structure, policies, investments, etc. be made publicly available?

No. 257.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 19, 2023—Regarding housing:

1.What is the current status of the government’s 2021 federal election campaign promise to create a National Indigenous Housing Centre?

2.Which federal departments are working on the creation of a National Indigenous Housing Centre? How many federal public servants are currently working on its creation?

3.How much has the government spent to date to create a National Indigenous Housing Centre?

4.Why did Budget 2023 make no mention of a National Indigenous Housing Centre?

5.When will the National Indigenous Housing Centre be operational?

No. 258.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 19, 2023—Regarding the Canada Infrastructure Bank:

1.How many current employees of the Canada Infrastructure Bank have previously worked for McKinsey & Company? What percentage is this out of the total number of current employees?

2.How many former employees of the Canada Infrastructure Bank also previously worked for McKinsey & Company? What percentage is this out of the total number of former employees?

No. 261.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 19, 2023—Regarding non-disclosure agreements (NDA):

In November 2016, the Ottawa Citizen reported that 235 military personnel and federal employees working on the fighter jet replacement project across seven departments had signed an NDA. The NDAs for this project were first implemented in January 2016.

1.How many NDAs are currently in place regarding the fighter jet replacement project, broken down by department?

2.Aside from the fighter jets, are NDAs in place for individuals working on any other military procurement projects? If so, for each procurement project, please provide:

(a)The name of the project;

(b)The number of NDAs signed, broken down by department;

(c)The date these NDAs were first implemented;

(d)The rationale for requiring an NDA to be signed.

No. 266.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

September 19, 2023—Regarding the 2022 Public Order Emergency:

The minutes of a February 6, 2022, meeting tabled with the Public Order Emergency Commission quoted the head of CSIS, David Vigneault, as saying: “There is not a lot of energy and support from the U.S.A. to Canada. CSIS has also not seen any foreign money coming from other states to support this.”

On February 11, 2022, when the Prime Minister was asked by journalist Marieke Walsh for details on the percentage of financing coming from the U.S., he said: “Those aren’t details that I have right in front of me. I have heard that, on certain platforms, the number of U.S. donations are approaching 50%.”

Where did the Prime Minister receive this information?

No. 271.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 2, 2023—Regarding the Bank of Canada:

1.For each of the last five years, how much in bonuses were paid to employees?

(a)For each of these amounts, how is it broken down by type of bonus?

(b)For each of these amounts, how much was paid in total to the top 10 executives?

2.What criteria was used to determine if a bonus was payable and the amount of the bonus?

3.Was the responsible Minister consulted before any of the payments were made?

4.How many employees did the Bank of Canada have on December 31 of each of the last five years?

No. 277.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 2, 2023—Regarding the Canada Development Investment Corporation (CDEV):

1.For each of the last five years, how much in bonuses were paid to employees?

(a)For each of these amounts, how is it broken down by type of bonus?

(b)For each of these amounts, how much was paid in total to the top 10 executives?

2.What criteria was used to determine if a bonus was payable and the amount of the bonus?

3.Was the responsible Minister consulted before any of the payments were made?

4.How many employees did CDEV have on December 31 of each of the last five years?

No. 278.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 2, 2023—Regarding the Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation (CDIC):

1.For each of the last five years, how much in bonuses were paid to employees?

(a)For each of these amounts, how is it broken down by type of bonus?

(b)For each of these amounts, how much was paid in total to the top 10 executives?

2.What criteria was used to determine if a bonus was payable and the amount of the bonus?

3.Was the responsible Minister consulted before any of the payments were made?

4.How many employees did CIDC have on December 31 of each of the last five years?

No. 279.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 2, 2023—Regarding the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC):

1.For each of the last five years, how much in bonuses were paid to employees?

(a)For each of these amounts, how is it broken down by type of bonus?

(b)For each of these amounts, how much was paid in total to the top 10 executives?

2.What criteria was used to determine if a bonus was payable and the amount of the bonus?

3.Was the responsible Minister consulted before any of the payments were made?

4.How many employees did CMHC have on December 31 of each of the last five years?

No. 281.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

November 2, 2023—Regarding the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPP Investments):

1.For each of the last five years, how much in bonuses were paid to employees?

(a)For each of these amounts, how is it broken down by type of bonus?

(b)For each of these amounts, how much was paid in total to the top 10 executives?

2.What criteria was used to determine if a bonus was payable and the amount of the bonus?

3.Was the responsible Minister consulted before any of the payments were made?

4.How many employees did CPP Investments have on December 31 of each of the last five years?

No. 299.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 6, 2024—Regarding the Royal Canadian Mint:

1.For each of the last five years, how much in bonuses were paid to employees?

(a)For each of these amounts, how is it broken down by type of bonus?

(b)For each of these amounts, how much was paid in total to the top 10 executives?

2.What criteria was used to determine if a bonus was payable and the amount of the bonus?

3.Was the responsible Minister consulted before any of the payments were made?

4.How many employees did the Royal Canadian Mint have on December 31 of each of the last five years?

No. 308.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 6, 2024—Regarding the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s December 2016-January 2017 family vacation at the Aga Khan’s private Bell Island in the Bahamas:

1.What was the total amount of costs incurred by the RCMP during this trip? How were these amounts broken down?

2.How many times did the RCMP attempt to reimburse Bell Island managers for these costs? On what date was the last attempt made?

3.It was reported in December 2019 that the RCMP had decided in mid-2018 not to reimburse Bell Island for their costs associated with this trip. Did the RCMP ever re-visit this decision? If so, when?

4.As a result of these unpaid expenses, did the RCMP ever consider recusing themselves from the decision whether to investigate if the Prime Minister broke the law by accepting this vacation?

5.Documents released through Access to Information in 2022 indicate the RCMP decided not to charge the Prime Minister with fraud under section 121(1)(c) of the Criminal Code as the RCMP was unclear if he had the ability to provide written approval for his own free trip. In the House of Commons on April 26, 2022, the Prime Minister confirmed he had not given himself permission. After the Prime Minister made this statement, did the RCMP re-consider opening its investigation, or consider referring the matter to another police agency for investigation? If not, why not?

No. 309.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 6, 2024—Regarding the Infrastructure Bank:

1.In 2022 and 2023, how much did the Infrastructure Bank pay out in each category?

(a)Termination benefits

(b)Short-term incentive or performance benefits

(c)Long-term incentive or performance benefits

(d)Any other discretionary bonuses

2.What is the total amount the Infrastructure Bank has paid out in all forms of compensation between December 1, 2021, and December 31, 2023?

No. 310.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 6, 2024—Regarding invasive wild pigs in Western Canada:

1.Does the Government of Canada have a cost estimate for the agricultural damage the invasive wild pig population has caused in Canada through the destruction of crops, spreading disease to farms and livestock, etc.?

2.Work on Canada’s Wild Pig Strategy began in 2021. Has this strategy since been implemented? If not, when will it be in place?

3.What actions have been taken since 2021 by federal departments and/or agencies to reduce the population of invasive wild pigs in Canada?

4.How much has the Government of Canada spent to address this issue since 2021? How is this spending broken down?

5.What work has been done with the U.S. government and/or individual American states on this issue?

No. 311.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 29, 2024—Regarding the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPP Investments):

On February 27, 2024, Fortune magazine reported: “Canada Pension Plan Investment Board has done three deals at discounted prices, selling its interests in a pair of Vancouver towers, a business park in Southern California and a redevelopment project in Manhattan, with the New York stake offloaded for the eyebrow-raising price of just $1.”

1.Could CPP Investments confirm that each of these sales took place? If so, what was the rationale for each sale?

2.How much did CPP Investments spend to acquire each of these properties?

3.How much did CPP Investments spend in relation to each property (including but not limited to operational costs) prior to their sale?

4.How much did CPP Investments sell each of these properties for, and what were their conditions of sale?

No. 312.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

February 29, 2024—Regarding a fixed transportation link between Newfoundland and Labrador across the Strait of Belle Isle:

The Prime Minister’s mandate letter to the former Minister of Infrastructure and Communities dated December 13, 2019, mentioned “supporting the Newfoundland-Labrador fixed transportation link”.

1.What is the current status of this work?

2.Since December 2019, how much has the Government of Canada spent on work related to the proposed fixed link?

3.What is the Government of Canada’s response to a report on the proposed fixed link from the Arup engineering firm? Has this report been made publicly available? If not, why not?

No. 315.

By the Honourable Senator Pate:

March 19, 2024—In what the government itself, and now the Supreme Court of Canada, has stated to be both horrific and appalling, over 52% of all children in state care in Canada are Indigenous, despite Indigenous children representing less than 8% of children in Canada. There are more than three times as many Indigenous children in state care today as there were children enrolled in residential schools at their peak. This is a stain on our national conscience.

The Government of Canada has recently begun to implement an historic settlement providing for both compensation and urgent reform in regard to Indigenous child welfare, for which it is to be commended. But this settlement applies only to on-reserve First Nation children and families who were victims of the broken Indigenous child welfare system. Left out of this settlement and reforms, and left out in the cold, are the thousands of off-reserve First Nation, non–Indian Act status, Inuit and Métis children and families.

These children and families are no less Indigenous merely because they were not apprehended on a reserve, and they are no less over-represented in child welfare. Failure to address the plight of off-reserve and non-status First Nation, and Inuit and Métis children and families is a half-measure at best and will ensure this humanitarian crisis continues unabated.

Not only has the government excluded these off-reserve Indigenous children from settlement and reform, it continues to fight them in court.

Two weeks ago, the Supreme Court of Canada, in an historic ruling, confirmed the enormity of the crisis, the urgent need to bring it to an end as a matter of reconciliation and, importantly, confirmed that the federal government has full jurisdiction to address this issue under our constitution.

Even with respect to off-reserve First Nation children and Inuit children, there is more than one instance where Canada has, in fact, accepted sole responsibility for their loss of cultural identity and other harms, despite provincial involvement, including, for example, the Sixties Scoop settlement. So why in this instance does the government accept sole responsibility in regard to on-reserve Indigenous children, but assert that the provinces have responsibility for off-reserve children? Surely the answer cannot be that they are considered less Indigenous in the eyes of Canada?

As stated by the Federal Court in the Stonechild matter: “At a time of truth and reconciliation, federal responsibility to Indigenous children should not be hidden behind provincial and territorial walls.” If Canada believes the provinces should be involved in resolution, will it not agree that it is nevertheless incumbent on the federal government to show leadership and bring all parties to the table — including the provinces and Indigenous representatives, to finally and fully address this issue?

With this guidance, when will the government agree that it is time to stop fighting Indigenous children in court, and instead launch and lead an urgent national process aimed at resolution of this overlooked but critical aspect of the crisis of Indigenous over-representation in state care? If not now, why not?

No. 316.

By the Honourable Senator Pate:

March 19, 2024—During Question Period on February 7, 2024, I referred to the tragic death last year of the human rights defender, Nell Toussaint. Ms. Toussaint was subsequently honoured last month at a reception hosted by the Speaker of the House to recognize Black History Month.

I noted in my question that Canada has yet to comply with the decision of the UN Human Rights Committee in Ms. Toussaint’s historic case, which required Canada to take necessary measures to ensure access to health care for irregular migrants to protect their right to life.

I further noted that Canada was due to submit its report to the UN Human Rights Council by February 12, 2024, in which it was to respond to each recommendation made during Canada’s recent Universal Periodic Review of human rights in Canada. Those recommendations included recommendations to ensure access to health care services for irregular migrants and their children. I asked for information about measures the government would be taking to address these concerns.

At that time, the Government Representative in the Senate indicated that he was unable to respond to the specifics of my question at that time and undertook to raise this matter with relevant ministers. In follow-up, I am hoping that the response might include information regarding the particular response submitted by Canada to the UN Human Rights Council regarding recommendation 37.180 of the Report of the Working Group on the Universal Periodic Review — Canada A/HRC/55/12 that Canada: “Ensure improved access to health services for all, especially persons in vulnerable situations and those with no immigration status”.

No. 317.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 9, 2024—In relation to the answers provided by Public Services and Procurement Canada to Senate Order Paper question No. 173 in the 44th Parliament, 1st session:

The answer provided in February 2023 showed a total of $805,600 spent to come up with a plan for 24 Sussex Drive. Could the government provide updated information on any additional spending since the previous answer? For each contract, please provide:

(a)The name of the recipient firm or individual of a related contract;

(b)The amount of the contract(s);

(c)The date the contract began and ended; and

(d)A summary of the work provided under the contract.

No. 318.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 9, 2024—Regarding handguns:

The freeze on the importation, sale, transfer etc. of handguns has been active since October 22, 2022. This 17-month period should be sufficient to measure trends as to how this is affecting numerous related activities such as street crime including murders, suicides, sports retail stores, gun clubs and shooting ranges, and responsible gun owners.

Could the Government of Canada provide statistics that relate directly to the freeze in the following areas?

1.The number and type of handguns that have been collected following the freeze by confiscation following the death of a registered owner of a handgun (since these can no longer be possessed by the deceased and could not be further transferred).

2.The make and model of each handgun collected: e.g., single or double action revolver, caliber and cylinder capacity, semi-automatic and magazine capacity, muzzle loader antiques, etc.

3.The owner’s use /or intended use of each collected handgun: e.g., murder, suicide, armed robbery and carjacking, target shooting, sports and competitive shooting, collections and heirloom preservation.

4.The value of each confiscated handgun.

5.The quantified reduction or increase in street crime, murders and suicides resulting from “taking these registered handguns off the street”.

6.Quantified negative impacts on sports clubs, ranges, and sports retailers.

7.The long-term impact assessment of the Bill, i.e., in three generations, when all registered handguns are gone:

(a)The total number (open source shows 1,235,914 registered firearms) and a detailed description of the handguns to be confiscated;

(b)Confirm that the total value of guns to be confiscated with no compensation; 1,235,914 firearms will be worth about $2 billion. Confirm that the rendering useless of handgun storage facilities and locks, plus now wasted funds spent on gun training courses and RPALs (Registered Possession and Acquisition Licenses) comprises approximately an additional 1.5 billion dollars;

(c)Amount to be collected by the government should it decide to sell the confiscated property overseas;

(d)Aggregated quantified failure of sports clubs, gun ranges and related retail stores;

(e)Total number of families negatively impacted by the destruction of their collections and family heirlooms; of course with no compensation.

No. 319.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 9, 2024—Regarding Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC):

1.Have any PSPC employees been terminated for fraudulently accessing the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB)? If so, how many?

2.Is PSPC currently investigating any employees for fraud related to CERB? If so, how many employees are currently being investigated?

No. 320.

By the Honourable Senator Plett:

April 9, 2024—Regarding the Canada Student Loans Program:

1.In a written response to question No. 53 on the Senate’s Order Paper in the 43rd Parliament, 2nd Session, Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) stated: “As of September 2020, the amount of direct loans in default is valued at $2.45B.” What is the value of outstanding student loans in default as of March 31, 2024?

2.Regarding the Repayment Assistance Plan, the Auditor General stated in a Spring 2020 report: “We noted that, as of 31 July 2018, 87% of borrowers participating in the plan were making no repayments. The value of these loans was $2.9 billion.” How many borrowers were making no repayments as of March 31, 2024, and what was the value of these loans?

3.In the Spring 2020 report, the Auditor General of Canada recommended “…mandatory training for student loan applicants before loans are provided and for student loan recipients who abandon or complete their studies”. Did ESDC conduct a feasibility study into mandatory financial literacy training for post-secondary students, as previously indicated? If so, on what dates did it start and end? What were the results? If the feasibility study was not carried out, why not?

4.How has ESDC worked to address all recommendations contained in the Auditor General’s Spring 2020 report? Have all recommendations been implemented? If not, why not?

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