SENATE SUBCOMMITTEE ON THE BOREAL FOREST

COMPETING REALITIES: The Boreal Forest at Risk


Manitoba: Allocation of the boreal forest to industry and amount of protected status forest. Estimates made from various sources of data.

1. Ownership of the ‘Boreal – predominately forest’ Forest Region landbase1.

Ownership Hectares

Federal Crown 306,020
First Nation (IR) 156,079
Provincial Crown 27,555,273
Municipal 109,511
Non-Industrial private 1,772,317

Total 29,899,200
2. Amount of landbase converted or seriously degraded (e.g., converted to cropland, urbanization, pasture); assume reasonably approximated by municipal and non-industrial private.  

 

 

1,881,828

3. Amount of boreal forest landbase that remains. 28,017,372
4. Amount of boreal forest allocated to the forest industry.  
  1. Forest Zone Provincial Crown land2.
  2. Long-term allocation (1994) was 63.9% of the annual allowable cut3. Therefore approximately 63.9% of the previous hectares would be allocated to industry4.
 


27,555,273

 

17,607,819

5. Percentage of boreal forest landbase allocated to the forest industry.

a. Of the original boreal forest – 58.9%. 
b. Of the remaining boreal forest – 62.8%.

6. Amount of boreal forest in which logging, mining and hydro-electric development cannot occur5

a. Of the original boreal forest – 4.0%6.

 

1,193,562


1Source: K. Power, Canadian Forest Service. Hectares exclusive of ‘large water’ land class.

2The Manitoba Forest Zone encompasses almost the entire ‘boreal – predominately forest’ region plus some of the ‘boreal – forest and barren’ forest region.

3Source: Manitoba’s Forest Plan … Towards Ecosystems Based Management (1995); exclusive of the Aspen Parkland forest section. Recent and pending allocations not included (significant allocation of hardwoods has occurred since 1994 (Repap Manitoba Inc. Forest Management Plan. 1996.); a significant allocation of softwoods to Pine Falls Paper Company is pending). The great majority of unallocated volume is inaccessible therefore the analysis does not reflect regional allocation levels. For example, "The Mountain Forest Section accounts for the largest percentage of the provincial AAC, with 17% of the available harvest volume from Open Zone provincial Crown land. This forest section is currently fully committed to forest operations." (Five Year Report on the Status of Forestry. 1996).

4Estimates do not account for netdown of landbase (e.g., Manitoba "Natural Areas’; economically, environmentally or physically inaccessible forest lands; ‘non-productive’ land class).

5Hectares are for Natural Regions 4a, 4b, 4c, 5a, 5b, 5c and 7. Source: World Wildlife Fund database; B. Watkins, Manitoba Natural Resources.

6Estimate does not include recent announcements granting interim protection to Long Point, Chitek Lake or Poplar River. Inclusion of Long Point and Chitek Lake will increase the level to 4.7%; Poplar River (792,000 ha) should substantially increase the level; however, the final hectares of the area may be considerably less.


Saskatchewan: Allocation of the boreal forest to industry and amount of protected status forest. Estimates made from various sources of data.

1. Ownership of the ‘Boreal – predominately forest’ Forest Region landbase1.

Ownership Hectares

Federal Crown 339,511
First Nation (IR) 85,486
Provincial Crown 27,945,309
Non-Industrial private 354
Unspecified private 1,281,365
Unclassified 584,883
Total 30,236,908
2. Amount of landbase converted or seriously degraded (e.g.,converted to cropland, urbanization, pasture); assume reasonably approximated by non-industrial and unspecified private.  

1,281,699

3. Amount of boreal forest landbase that remains. 28,955,209
4 Amount of boreal forest landbase allocated to the forest industry2.  
  1. Commercial Forest Zone.
  2. Long-term allocation was 77% of the annual allowable cut.
  3. Therefore approximately 77% of the area of the Commercial Forest Zone would be allocated to industry3.

 


12,900,000

 

 

9,933,000

5. Percentage of boreal forest allocated to the forest industry4.

a. Of the original boreal forest – 32.9%.

b. Of the remaining boreal forest – 34.3%.

6. Amount of boreal forest in which logging, mining and hydro-electric development cannot occur5.

a. Of the original boreal forest – 6.8%.

2,058,842

1Source: K. Power, Canadian Forest Service.

2State of the Resource Report. 1993.

3Estimates do not account for netdown of landbase (e.g., Saskatchewan ‘Representative Areas’, ‘other non-forest’ land class).

4Allocation has occurred exclusively or almost exclusively in the Boreal Plain ecozone. Estimate does not include recent pending allocation and reallocation.

5Hectares are for the Boreal Shield and Boreal Plain ecozones. Source: World Wildlife Fund database; N. Cherney, Saskatchewan Environment and Resource Management.


Alberta: Allocation of the boreal forest to industry and amount of protected status forest. Estimates made from various sources of data.

1. Ownership of the ‘Boreal – predominately forest’ Forest Region landbase1.

Ownership Hectares

Federal Crown 3,632,654
First Nation (IR) 173,419
Provincial Crown 33,262,955
Municipal 23,609
Unspecified private 2,554,061
Unclassified 1,661,073

Total 41,307,771
2.Amount of landbase converted or seriously degraded (e.g., converted to cropland, urbanization, pasture); assume reasonably approximated by municipal, unspecified private and unclassified  

 

4,238,743

3. Amount of boreal forest landbase that remains . 37,069,028
.
4. Amount of boreal forest landbase allocated to the forest industry .
   a. Green Zone Provincial Crown land   33,262,955
   b. Less Green Zone land for which no annual allowable cut has been calculated or allocation made (Units All, A12, A13, F10, F20 and L9: 4,779,478 hectares)2 .


28,483,477
   c. Long-term allocation is 91.4% of the annual allowable cut2.
Therefore approximately 91.4% of the previous hectares would be allocated to industry3.
 

26,033,898

.
5. Percentage of boreal forest allocated to the forest industry.
  a. Of the original boreal forest – 63.0%.
  b. Of the remaining boreal forest – 70.2%4.
6.  Amount of boreal forest in which logging, mining and hydro-electric development cannot occur5.

3,865,900
  a. Of the original boreal forest – 9.4%6.

1Source: K. Power, Canadian Forest Service.

2Source: D. Price, Alberta Land and Forest Service.

3Estimates do not account for netdown of landbase (e.g., Alberta ‘Special Places’; economically, environmentally or physically inaccessible forest lands, ‘other nonforest’ lands).

4Significant amounts, perhaps most, of the unallocated boreal forest consists of land with low volumes of wood fiber.

5Hectares are for the Foothills, Boreal Forest and Canadian Shield natural regions.

Source: World Wildlife Fund database; Alberta Special Places ‘Progress of Special Places’ website (updated January 19, 1999).

6Protected hectares almost exclusively from the northern part of the boreal forest (e.g., Wood Buffalo National Park encompasses 3.6 million hectares).


Ontario: Allocation of the boreal and Great Lakes – St. Lawrence forest to industry and amount of protected status forest. Estimates made from various sources of data.

1. Ownership of the ‘Boreal – predominately forest’ and ‘Great Lakes – St. Lawrence’ Forest Regions landbase1.

 

Ownership Hectares

Federal Crown 287,268
First Nation (IR) 446,732
Provincial Crown 66,203,290
Private 9,822,400

Total  76,759,690

2. Amount of forest landbase under Federal Crown and Provincial Crown ownership
66,490,558
.
3. Amount of Crown forest landbase allocated to the forest industry.
  a. Inventoried productive Crown forest available to industry2.
25,046,494
  b. Inventoried productive Crown forest3. 34,139,500
  c. Percentage available/total – 73.4%.
  d.Inventoried Crown forest landbase (forested and non-forested)3.
47,895,900
  e. First estimate of Crown forest landbase available to industry (Inventoried Crown forest landbase X 73.4%).
35,138,897
  f. Net annual allowable cut from a2. 325,892
  g. Planned Crown harvest2. 314,968
  h. Final estimate of Crown forest landbase available to industry (Netted down for planned to allowable)4.
33,961,030
4. Percentage of forest landbase allocated to the forest industry.
   a. Of the Crown forest – 51.1%.
5. Amount of forest in which logging, mining and hydro-electric development cannot occur5.
3,469,100
  a. Of the Crown forest – 5.2%.

1Source: Total area calculated from Table 1 of Information Report PI-X-122 (1995. Canadian Forest Service.). Ownership estimated from data in summary of "The Forest Resources of Ontario" (www.mnr.gov.on.ca…fmb_info/html) and Table 2.4 of "The Forest Resources of Ontario" (1996. Provided by Mr. Robert Mears of Ontario MNR). Breakdown between Federal Crown and First Nation lands according to percentage in Table 16.20 of Information Report PI-X-115 (1994. Canadian Forest Service.).

2Source: Mr. Richard Raper, Ontario MNR. Estimates based on summation of Five Year Forest Management Plans.

3Table 2.4 of "The Forest Resources of Ontario" (1996. Provided by Mr. Robert Mears of Ontario MNR).

 

4The forest management planning process also allows for netdowns of the landbase (e.g., for environmentally or economically inaccessible forest lands).

5Hectares are for all Site Districts exclusive of Regions 1E and 7E and Site Districts 2E1, 2E2, 2W2, 6E13 and 6E15. Source: World Wildlife Fund database. Implications of ‘Living Legacy’ not considered.


16. Changes in Industrial Capacity

 

Manitoba: Changes in industrial capacity.

 Pulpmills, Newsprint and Paperboard

19731 Abitibi Paper Company Ltd.  Pine Falls 464 tonnes/day newsprint
Building Products of Canada Ltd. Winnipeg 21,800 tonnes/year roofing felt paper
Manfor Ltd. The Pas 327 tonnes/day unbleached kraft paper

19852 Manfor Ltd. The Pas 391 tonnes/day

Panelboard Mills

1973 Welclad Industries Canada Ltd. Winnipeg 37 M ft2/8 hr shift (1/2" basis) fibreboard
19972 Louisiana-Pacific Canada Ltd. Minitonas 450 MM ft2/year (3/8" basis) OSB
Palliser Furniture Ltd. Winnipeg 60 MM ft2/year (3/8" basis) particleboard

 

Sawmills (>5 MM Annual Production)

1973 Three sawmills 327 Mfbm/8 hour shift
1985 Five sawmill-planing complexes 330 Mfbm/8 hour shift (saw);
185 Mfbm/8 hour shift (plane)
19912 Three sawmill-planing complexes 290 Mfbm/8 hour shift (saw);
315 Mfbm/8 hour shift (plane)

Note: MM = million; M = thousand; ADMT = air dry metric tonne; fbm = foot board measure.

1Data represents majority of industrial capacity in 1973. Source: A Directory of Primary Wood-Using Industries in West-Central Canada, 1973.

2Data for 1985, 1991 and 1997 represent notable additions or new capacities for upgrades to capacity since the previously reported year; data for 1997 based on voluntary reporting and may not be complete. Source: Directory of Primary Wood-Using Industries in Manitoba - 1985.; Directory of Primary Wood-Using Industries in Manitoba – 1991.; Directory of Primary Wood Using Industries in Manitoba – 1998.


Saskatchewan: Changes in industrial capacity.

 

Pulpmills, Newsprint and Paperboard

19731 Prince Albert Pulp Company Ltd. Prince Albert 773 tonnes/day bleached sulphate pulp
Domtar Construction Materials Ltd. Saskatoon 40 MM ft2/year (1/2" basis) board
19922 Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd.3 Prince Albert 960 ADMT/day blended kraft pulp;
640 ADMT/day paper
Millar Western Pulp Ltd. Meadow Lake  700 ADMT/day ctm pulp

Panelboard Mills

19731 MacMillan Bloedel (Saskatchewan) Ltd. Hudson Bay 150 MM ft2/year (3/8" basis) sheathing panel
19852 Saskatchewan Forest Products Corporation Hudson Bay  180 M ft2/8 hour shift (3/8" basis) plywood

Sawmills (>5 MM Annual Production)

19731 Three sawmills; three planing mills 362 Mfbm/8 hour shift (saw);
138 Mfbm/8 hour shift (plane)
1985 Six sawmill-planing complexes 635 Mfbm/8 hour shift (saw);
555 Mfbm/8 hour shift (plane)
Two planning mills 105 Mfbm/8 hour shift
1992 Four sawmill-planing complexes 560 Mfbm/8 hour shift (saw);
552 Mfbm/8 hour shift (plane)
One planing mill. 50 Mfbm/8 hour shift

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

Note: MM = million; M = thousand; ADMT = air dry metric tonne; fbm = foot board measure

1 Data represents majority of industrial capacity in 1973. Source: A Directory of Primary Wood-Using Industries in West-Central Canada, 1973.

2Data for 1985 and 1992 represent notable additions or new capacities for upgrades since the previously reported year. Source: A Directory of Primary Wood-Using Industries in Saskatchewan - 1985.; Directory of Primary Wood-Using Industries in Saskatchewan - 1992.

3Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd. acquired Prince Albert Pulp Company Ltd..


Alberta: Changes in industrial capacity.

Pulpmills, Newsprint and Paperboard

19731 Building Products of Canada Ltd. Edmonton 23,600 tonnes/year roofing felt paper
IKO Industries Ltd. Calgary 16.4 tonnes/8 hr shift paper;
65 M ft2/8 hr shift (1/2" basis) board
North Western Pulp and Power Ltd.  Hinton 180,000 tonnes/year bleached kraft pulp
Proctor & Gamble Cellulose Ltd.  Grande Prairie 227,000 tonnes/year bleached kraft pulp
19922 Alberta Newsprint Company Whitecourt 625 tonnes/day newsprint
Daishowa-Marubeni International Ltd. Peace River 1000 ADMT/day bleached kraft pulp
IKO Industries Ltd. Calgary 118 tonnes/8 hr shift paper;
250 M ft2/8 hr shift (1/2" basis) board
Millar Western Pulp Ltd. Whitecourt 700 tonnes/day ctm pulp
Slave Lake Pulp Corporation Slave Lake 350 ADMT/day cmt pulp
Weldwood of Canada Ltd.3 Hinton 1100 ADMT/day bleached kraft pulp
Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd.3  Grande Prairie 905 tonnes/day bleached kraft pulp
19952 Alberta-Pacific Forest Industries Inc.  Boyle 500,000 ADMT/year bleached kraft pulp
19992 Slave Lake Pulp Corporation 165,000 ADMT/year ctm pulp

Panelboard Mills

1973 Crestbrook Forest Industries Ltd. Fort McLoed 55 MM ft2/year (3/8" basis) plywood
North Canadian Forest Industries Ltd. Grande Prairie 75 MM ft2/year (3/8" basis) plywood
Zeidler Plywood Corporation Edmonton 70 MM ft2/year (3/8" basis) panels
Building Products of Canada Ltd. Wabamum 54 MM ft2/year (1/2" basis) fibreboard

1992 Blue Ridge Lumber (1981) Ltd. Blue Ridge 123 M ft2/8 hr shift (3/8" basis) fibreboard
Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd. Drayton Valley 315 MM ft2/year (3/8" basis) OSB
Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd. Edson 310 MM ft2/year (3/8" basis) OSB
Zeidler Forest Industries Ltd.  Slave Lake 166 Mfbm/8 hr shift veneer

1995 Ainsworth Lumber Co. Ltd.  Grande Prairie 540 MM ft2/year (3/8" basis) OSB
Tolko Industries Ltd. High Prairie 450 MM ft2/year (3/8" basis) OSB
Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd. Slave Lake 200 MM ft2/year (3/8" basis) OSB
1999 West Fraser Mills Ltd.3 Blue Ridge 200 MM ft2/year (3/8" basis) fibreboard

Sawmills (>5 MM Annual Production)

1973 Thirty-two sawmills; eight planing mills 2,127 Mfbm/8 hour shift (saw);
540 Mfbm/8 hour shift (plane)
1992 Thirty-three sawmills and sawmill-planing 4,641 Mfbm/8 hour shift (saw);
complexes; two planing mills 5,033 Mfbm/8 hour shift (plane)

Note: MM = million; M = thousand; ADMT = air dry metric tonne; fbm = foot board measure.

1Data represents majority of industrial capacity in 1973. Source: A Directory of Primary Wood-Using Industries in West-Central Canada, 1973.

2Data for 1992, 1995 and 1999 represent notable additions or new capacities for upgrades since the previously reported year; data for 1995 based on voluntary reporting and may not be complete. Source: Directory of Primary Wood-Using Industries in Alberta – 1992; Directory of Primary Wood Products Manufacturing in Alberta - 1995; www.abforestprod.org/

3North Western Pulp and Power Ltd. became Weldwood of Canada Ltd.; Proctor & Gamble Cellulose Ltd. became Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd.; Blue Ridge Lumber (1981) Ltd. became West Fraser Mills Ltd.


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