Previous Sittings
Previous Sittings

Order Paper and Notice Paper

 
 

The Senate of Canada

Order Paper and Notice Paper

(at dissolution - September 7, 2008)


Issue 74

Tuesday, September 16, 2008
2:00 p.m.

Orders of the Day

Notice Paper

Questions


The Order Paper and Notice Paper is a document that guides the deliberations of the Senate and lists items of business currently before it. These items are listed in several different categories and in a priority according to an arrangement adopted by the Senate as stipulated in the rules. The majority of these items constitute the Orders of the Day which are called following the daily Routine of Business.  These items are themselves divided into two principal categories - government business and other business. Within each of these two categories are items for bills, motions, inquiries and reports of committees.

The Notice Paper contains the text of motions and inquiries not yet called for debate. 

The Order Paper and Notice Paper is prepared every day in advance of the actual sitting.


Daily Routine of Business

1. Senators' Statements.

2. Tabling of Documents.

3. Presentation of Reports from Standing or Special Committees.

4. Government Notices of Motions.

5. Introduction and First Reading of Government Bills.

6. Introduction and First Reading of Senate Public Bills.

7. First Reading of Commons Public Bills.

8. Reading of Petitions for Private Bills.

9. Introduction and First Reading of Private Bills.

10. Tabling of Reports from Inter-Parliamentary Delegations.

11. Notices of Motions.

12. Notices of Inquiries.

13. Presentation of Petitions.

14. Question Period.

15. Delayed Answers.

16. Orders of the Day.

17. Inquiries.

18. Motions.


ORDERS OF THE DAY

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Bills

No. 1.

June 26, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Oliver, seconded by the Honourable Senator Segal, for the second reading of Bill C-29, An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act (accountability with respect to loans).

No. 2.

June 18, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Cochrane, seconded by the Honourable Senator Champagne, P.C., for the second reading of Bill S-4, An Act to amend the Energy Efficiency Act.

Inquiries

No. 1.

April 2, 2008-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Comeau, calling the attention of the Senate to the budget entitled, Responsible Leadership, tabled in the House of Commons on February 26, 2008, by the Minister of Finance, the Honourable James M. Flaherty, P.C., M.P., and in the Senate on February 27, 2008.

Motions

Nil

Reports of Committees

Nil

OTHER BUSINESS

Rule 27(3) states:

Unless previously ordered, any item under "Other Business'', "Inquiries'' and "Motions'' that has not been proceeded with during fifteen sittings shall be dropped from the Order Paper.

Consequently, the number appearing in parenthesis indicates the number of sittings since the item was last proceeded with.

Senate Public Bills

No. 1.

June 26, 2008-Third reading of Bill S-206, An Act to amend the Food and Drugs Act (clean drinking water).-(Honourable Senator Carstairs, P.C.)

No. 2.

March 4, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Banks, seconded by the Honourable Senator Day, for the second reading of Bill S-229, An Act to amend the Constitution Act, 1867 (Property qualifications of Senators).-(Honourable Senator Tardif)

No. 3. (one)

June 18, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Carstairs, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Cowan, for the second reading of Bill S-239, An Act to amend the Employment Insurance Act (foreign postings).-(Honourable Senator Stratton)

No. 4. (one)

June 18, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Hervieux-Payette, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Tardif, for the second reading of Bill S-241, An Act to amend the Investment Canada Act (foreign investments).-(Honourable Senator Comeau)

No. 5. (two)

March 4, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Milne, seconded by the Honourable Senator Cook, for the second reading of Bill S-230, An Act to amend the Excise Tax Act (zero-rating of supply of cut fresh fruit).-(Honourable Senator Comeau)

No. 6. (two)

June 17, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Munson, seconded by the Honourable Senator Mercer, for the second reading of Bill S-237, An Act respecting World Autism Awareness Day.-(Honourable Senator Mercer)

No. 7. (three)

June 10, 2008-Second reading of Bill S-238, An Act respecting Canadian professional football.-(Honourable Senator Campbell)

No. 8. (three)

June 12, 2008-Second reading of Bill S-240, An Act to amend the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.-(Honourable Senator Banks)

No. 9. (three)

October 30, 2007-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Grafstein, seconded by the Honourable Senator Corbin, for the second reading of Bill S-208, An Act to require the Minister of the Environment to establish, in co-operation with the provinces, an agency with the power to identify and protect Canada's watersheds that will constitute sources of drinking water in the future.-(Honourable Senator Banks)

No. 10. (four)

June 10, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Murray, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Segal, for the second reading of Bill S-236, An Act to amend the Financial Administration Act (borrowing of money).-(Honourable Senator Segal)

No. 11. (seven)

May 7, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Gill, seconded by the Honourable Senator Watt, for the second reading of Bill S-234, An Act to establish an assembly of the aboriginal peoples of Canada and an executive council.-(Honourable Senator Comeau)

No. 12. (seven)

April 30, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Grafstein, seconded by the Honourable Senator Corbin, for the second reading of Bill S-233, An Act to amend the Library and Archives of Canada Act (National Portrait Gallery).-(Honourable Senator Stratton)

No. 13. (ten)

May 13, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Goldstein, seconded by the Honourable Senator Adams, for the second reading of Bill S-235, An Act concerning unsolicited commercial electronic messages. -(Honourable Senator Comeau)

No. 14. (thirteen)

November 22, 2007-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Murray, P.C., for the Honourable Senator Carney, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Day, for the second reading of Bill S-217, An Act to amend the International Boundary Waters Treaty Act (bulk water removal). -(Honourable Senator Nolin)

No. 15. (fifteen)

December 5, 2007-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Grafstein, seconded by the Honourable Senator Stollery, for the second reading of Bill S-211, An Act to regulate securities and to provide for a single securities commission for Canada.-(Honourable Senator Fraser)

No. 16. (four)

April 10, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Segal, seconded by the Honourable Senator Meighen, for the second reading of Bill S-231, An Act to amend the Citizenship Act (oath of citizenship).-(Honourable Senator Comeau)

No. 17. (nine)

January 30, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Grafstein, seconded by the Honourable Senator Fitzpatrick, for the second reading of Bill S-226, An Act to amend the Business Development Bank of Canada Act (municipal infrastructure bonds) and to make a consequential amendment to another Act.-(Honourable Senator Eyton)

No. 18. (one)

June 18, 2008-Second reading of Bill S-242, An Act to amend the Telecommunications Act (telecommunications consumer agency).-(Honourable Senator Oliver)

No. 19.

June 26, 2008-Second reading of Bill S-243, An Act respecting the office of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development.-(Honourable Senator McCoy)

Commons Public Bills

No. 1. (one)

March 12, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Moore, seconded by the Honourable Senator Day, for the second reading of Bill C-253, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (deductibility of RESP contributions). -(Honourable Senator Comeau)

No. 2. (three)

June 10, 2008-Second reading of Bill C-377, An Act to ensure Canada assumes its responsibilities in preventing dangerous climate change.-(Honourable Senator Comeau)

No. 3. (three)

June 12, 2008-Second reading of Bill C-207, An Act to amend the Income Tax Act (tax credit for new graduates working in designated regions).-(Honourable Senator Comeau)

Private Bills

Nil

Reports of Committees

No. 1.

June 26, 2008-Consideration of the fourth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Fisheries and Oceans, entitled: The Coast Guard in Canada's Arctic: Interim Report, deposited with the Clerk of the Senate on June 23, 2008.-(Honourable Senator Cochrane)

No. 2.

June 26, 2008-Consideration of the seventeenth report (first interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology, entitled: Poverty, Housing and Homelessness: Issues and Options, tabled in the Senate on June 26, 2008.-(Honourable Senator Eggleton, P.C.)

No. 3. (one)

June 18, 2008-Consideration of the thirteenth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights, entitled: Canada and the United Nations Human Rights Council: A Time for Serious Re-Evaluation, tabled in the Senate on June 18, 2008. -(Honourable Senator Andreychuk)

No. 4. (one)

June 18, 2008-Consideration of the tenth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence, entitled: Report on Reductions of Services Income Security Insurance Plan Long Term Disability Benefits, tabled in the Senate on June 18, 2008.-(Honourable Senator Day)

No. 5. (one)

June 18, 2008-Consideration of the seventh report of the Standing Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade, entitled: Overcoming 40 Years Of Failure: A New Road Map For Sub-Saharan Africa, tabled in the Senate on February 15, 2007, during the First Session of the Thirty-ninth Parliament.-(Honourable Senator Di Nino)

No. 6. (two)

April 9, 2008-Resuming debate on the consideration of the tenth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology, entitled: Population Health Policy: Issues & Options, tabled in the Senate on April 2, 2008. -(Honourable Senator Prud'homme, P.C.)

No. 7. (two)

June 16, 2008-Consideration of the ninth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, entitled: Beyond Freefall: Halting Rural Poverty, presented in the Senate on June 16, 2008.-(Honourable Senator Fairbairn, P.C.)

No. 8. (three)

June 10, 2008-Consideration of the ninth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence entitled: How Are We Doing in Afghanistan? Canadians Need to Know, tabled in the Senate on June 10, 2008.-(Honourable Senator Kenny)

No. 9. (thirteen)

March 4, 2008-Resuming debate on the consideration of the fifth report of the Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources (subject-matter of Bill S-208, An Act to require the Minister of the Environment to establish, in co-operation with the provinces, an agency with the power to identify and protect Canada's watersheds that will constitute sources of drinking water in the future), tabled in the Senate on February 28, 2008.-(Honourable Senator Comeau)

No. 10. (fourteen)

November 28, 2007-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Keon, seconded by the Honourable Senator Segal, for the adoption of the second report of the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament (amendments to the Rules of the Senate-reinstatement of bills from the previous session of the same Parliament), presented in the Senate on November 20, 2007.-(Honourable Senator Comeau)

No. 11. (fourteen)

December 4, 2007-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Keon, seconded by the Honourable Senator Eyton, for the adoption of the third report of the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament (amendments to the Rules of the Senate-questions of privilege and points of order), presented in the Senate on November 20, 2007. -(Honourable Senator Fraser)

No. 12. (three)

June 12, 2008-Consideration of the eighth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, entitled: "Growing'' Costs for Canadian Farmers, tabled in the Senate on June 12, 2008.-(Honourable Senator Fairbairn, P.C.)

Other

No. 101. (motion)

June 26, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator McCoy, seconded by the Honourable Senator Segal:

That a message be sent to the House of Commons to remind that House that, in recognition of the primacy of the Commons with respect to bills for appropriating the public revenue and implementing government budgets, this House has voluntarily refrained for many years from amending such money bills; and to inform that House that this House nonetheless insists on its right under the Constitution Act, 1867 to amend any money bill containing substantive non- financial provisions such as those amending the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act found in Bill C-50, the Budget Implementation Act, 2008.-(Honourable Senator McCoy)

No. 11. (one) (motion)

December 5, 2007-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Segal, seconded by the Honourable Senator Keon:

That whenever the Senate is sitting, the proceedings of the upper chamber, like those of the lower one, be televised, or otherwise audio-visually recorded, so that those proceedings can be carried live or replayed on CPAC, or any other television station, at times that are convenient for Canadians;

And, on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Banks, seconded by the Honourable Senator Segal, that the motion be amended by deleting all words after the first "That'' and replacing them by the following:

"the Senate approve in principle the installation of equipment necessary to the broadcast-quality audio-visual recording of its proceedings and other approved events in the Senate Chamber and in no fewer than four rooms ordinarily used for meetings by Committees of the Senate;

That for the purposes set out in the following paragraph, public proceedings of the Senate and of its Committees be recorded by this equipment, subject to policies, practices and guidelines approved from time to time by the Standing Committee on Internal Economy, Budgets and Administration ("the Committee'');

That selected and edited proceedings categorized according to subjects of interest be prepared and made available for use by any television broadcaster or distributor of audio-visual programmes, subject to the terms specified in any current or future agreements between the Senate and that broadcaster or distributor;

That such selected proceedings also be made available on demand to the public on the Parliamentary Internet;

That the Senate engage by contract a producer who shall, subject only to the direction of the Committee, make the determination of the programme content of the selected, edited and categorized proceedings of the Senate and of its Committees;

That equipment and personnel necessary for the expert selection, editing, preparation and categorization of broadcast-quality proceedings be secured for these purposes; and

That the Committee be instructed to take measures necessary to the implementation of this motion.'';

And, on the motion of the Honourable Senator Comeau, seconded by the Honourable Senator Stratton, that the question now before the Senate be referred to the Standing Committee on Rules, Procedures and the Rights of Parliament.-(Honourable Senator Corbin)

No. 88. (one) (motion)

March 4, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Banks, seconded by the Honourable Senator Corbin:

That,

WHEREAS, in the 2nd Session of the 39th Parliament, a bill has been introduced in the Senate to amend the Constitution of Canada by repealing the provision that requires that a person, in order to qualify for appointment to the Senate and to maintain their place in the Senate after being appointed, own land with a net worth of at least four thousand dollars within the province for which he or she is appointed;

AND WHEREAS a related provision of the Constitution makes reference, in respect of the province of Quebec, to the real property qualification that is proposed to be repealed;

AND WHEREAS, in respect of a Senator that represents Quebec, the real property qualification must be had in the electoral division for which the Senator is appointed or the Senator must be resident in that division;

AND WHEREAS the division of Quebec into 24 electoral divisions, corresponding to the 24 seats in the former Legislative Council of Quebec, reflects the historic boundaries of Lower Canada and no longer reflects the full territorial limits of the province of Quebec;

AND WHEREAS section 43 of the Constitution Act, 1982 provides that an amendment to the Constitution of Canada may be made by proclamation issued by the Governor General under the Great Seal of Canada where so authorized by resolutions of the Senate and House of Commons and of the legislative assembly of each province to which the amendment applies;

NOW THEREFORE the Senate resolves that an amendment to the Constitution of Canada be authorized to be made by proclamation issued by Her Excellency the Governor General under the Great Seal of Canada in accordance with the schedule hereto.

SCHEDULE

AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF CANADA

1. Section 22 of the Constitution Act, 1867 is amended by striking out the second paragraph of that section, beginning with the words "In the Case of Quebec'' and ending with "the Consolidated Statutes of Canada.''.

2. (1) Paragraph (5) of section 23 of the Act is replaced by the following:

(5) He shall be resident in the Province for which he is appointed.

(2) Paragraph (6) of section 23 of the Act is repealed.

Citation

3. This Amendment may be cited as the Constitution Amendment, [year of proclamation] (Quebec: electoral divisions and real property qualifications of Senators).-(Honourable Senator Fraser)

No. 96. (one) (motion)

April 29, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Callbeck, seconded by the Honourable Senator Day:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology be authorized to examine and report on the accessibility of post-secondary education in Canada, including but not limited to:

(a) analysis of the current barriers in post-secondary education, such as geography, family income levels, means of financing for students and debt levels;

(b) evaluation of the current mechanisms for students to fund post-secondary education, such as Canada Student Loans Program, Canada Student Grants Program, Canada Access Grants, funding for Aboriginal students, Canada Learning Bonds, and Registered Education Savings Plans;

(c) examination of the current federal/provincial transfer mechanism for post-secondary education;

(d) evaluation of the potential establishment of a dedicated transfer for post-secondary education; and

(e) any other matters related to the study; and

That the Committee submit its final report no later than December 31, 2009, and that the Committee retain until June 30, 2010, all powers necessary to publicize its findings.-(Honourable Senator Comeau)

No. 79. (one) (motion)

February 12, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Segal, seconded by the Honourable Senator Tkachuk:

That the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology be authorized to examine and report on the implementation of a guaranteed annual income system, including the negative income tax model, as a qualitative improvement in income security, with a view to reducing the number of Canadians now living under the poverty line;

That the Committee consider the best possible design of a negative income tax that would:

(a) ensure that existing income security expenditures at the federal, provincial and municipal levels remain at the same level;

(b) create strong incentives for the able-bodied to work and earn a decent living;

(c) provide for coordination of federal and provincial income security through federal-provincial agreements; and

That the Committee submit its final report no later than June 30, 2009; and

That the Committee retain all powers necessary to publicize its findings until 90 days after the tabling of the final report. -(Honourable Senator Nolin)

No. 3. (one) (motion)

October 23, 2007-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Grafstein, seconded by the Honourable Senator Losier-Cool:

That the following Resolution on Combating Anti-Semitism and Other Forms of Intolerance, which was adopted at the 16th Annual Session of the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly, in which Canada participated in Kyiv, Ukraine on July 9, 2007, be referred to the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights for consideration and that the Committee table its final report no later than March 31, 2008:

RESOLUTION ON COMBATING ANTI-SEMITISM, RACISM, XENOPHOBIA AND OTHER FORMS
OF INTOLERANCE, INCLUDING AGAINST MUSLIMS AND ROMA

1. Recalling the Parliamentary Assembly's leadership in raising the focus and attention of the participating States since the 2002 Annual Session in Berlin on issues related to intolerance, discrimination, and hate crimes, including particular concern over manifestations of anti-Semitism, racism, xenophobia and other forms of intolerance,

2. Celebrating the richness of ethnic, cultural, racial, and religious diversity within the 56 OSCE participating States,

3. Emphasizing the need to ensure implementation of existing OSCE commitments on combating anti-Semitism, racism, xenophobia, and other forms of intolerance and discrimination, including against Christians, Muslims, and members of other religions, as well as against Roma,

4. Recalling other international commitments of the OSCE participating States, and urging immediate ratification and full implementation of the Convention on Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, the Convention on the Non-Applicability of Statutory Limitations to War Crimes and Crimes against Humanity, and the Rome Statute,

5. Reminding participating States that hate crimes and discrimination are motivated not only by race, ethnicity, sex, and religion or belief, but also by political opinion, national or social origin, language, birth or other status,

The OSCE Parliamentary Assembly:

6. Welcomes the convening of the June 2007 OSCE High Level Conference on Combating Discrimination and Promoting Mutual Respect and Understanding, in Bucharest, Romania as a follow-up to the 2005 Cordoba Conference on Anti-Semitism and Other Forms of Intolerance;

7. Appreciates the ongoing work undertaken by the OSCE and the Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (the OSCE/ODIHR) through its Programme on Tolerance and Non-discrimination, as well as its efforts to improve the situation of Roma and Sinti through its Contact Point for Roma and Sinti Issues, and supports the continued organization of expert meetings on anti-Semitism and other forms of intolerance aimed at enhancing the implementation of relevant OSCE commitments;

8. Recognizes the importance of the OSCE/ODIHR Law Enforcement Officers Programme (LEOP) in helping police forces within the participating States better to identify and combat hate crimes, and recommends that other participating States make use of it;

9. Reiterates its full support for the political-level work undertaken by the three Personal Representatives of the Chair-in-Office and endorses the continuance of their efforts under their existing and distinct mandates;

10. Reminds participating States of the Holocaust, its impact, and the continued acts of anti-Semitism occurring throughout the 56-nation OSCE region that are not unique to any one country and necessitate unwavering steadfastness by all participating States to erase the black mark on human history;

11. Calls upon participating States to recall that atrocities within the OSCE region motivated by race, national origin, sex, religion or belief, disability or sexual orientation have contributed to the negative perceptions and treatment of persons in the region;

12. Further recalls the resolutions on anti-Semitism adopted unanimously by the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly at its Annual Sessions in Berlin in 2002, Rotterdam in 2003, Edinburgh in 2004, Washington in 2005 and Brussels in 2006;

13. Reaffirms especially the 2002 Porto Ministerial Decision condemning "anti-Semitic incidents in the OSCE area, recognizing the role that the existence of anti-Semitism has played throughout history as a major threat to freedom'';

14. Recalls the agreement of the participating States, adopted in Cracow in 1991, to preserve and protect those monuments and sites of remembrance, including most notably extermination camps, and the related archives, which are themselves testimonials to tragic experiences in their common past;

15. Commends the 11 member states of the International Tracing Service for approving the immediate transfer of scanned Holocaust archives to receiving institutions and encourages all participating States to cooperate in opening, copying, and disseminating archival material from the Holocaust;

16. Commemorates the bicentennial of the 1807 Abolition of the Slave Trade Act which banned the slave trade in the British Empire, allowed for the search and seizure of ships suspected of transporting enslaved people, and provided compensation for the freedom of slaves;

17. Agrees that the transatlantic slave trade was a crime against humanity and urges participating states to develop educational tools, programmes, and activities to teach current and future generations about its significance

18. Acknowledges the horrible legacy that centuries of racism, slavery, colonialism discrimination, exploitation, violence, and extreme oppression have continued to have on the promulgation of stereotypes, prejudice, and hatred directed towards persons of African descent;

19. Reminds parliamentarians and participating States that Roma constitute the largest ethnic minority in the European Union and have suffered from slavery, genocide, mass expulsions and imprisonment, forced assimilations, and numerous other discriminatory practices in the OSCE region;

20. Reminds participating States of the role these histories and other events have played in the institutionalization of practices that limit members of minority groups from having equal access to and participation in state-sponsored institutions, resulting in gross disparities in health, wealth, education, housing, political participation, and access to legal redress through the courts:

21. Underscores the sentiments of earlier resolutions regarding the continuing threat that anti- Semitism and other forms of intolerance pose to the underlying fundamental human rights and democratic values that serve as the underpinnings for security in the OSCE region;

22. Therefore urges participating States to increase efforts to work with their diverse communities to develop and implement practices to provide members of minority groups with equal access to and opportunities within social, political, legal, and economic spheres;

23. Notes the growing prevalence of anti-Semitism, racism, xenophobia, and other forms of intolerance being displayed within popular culture, including the Internet, computer games, and sports;

24. Deplores the growing prevalence of anti-Semitic materials and symbols of racist, xenophobic and anti-Semitic organizations in some OSCE participating States;

25. Reminds participating States of the 2004 OSCE meeting on the Relationship between Racist, Xenophobic and Anti-Semitic Propaganda on the Internet and Hate Crimes and suggested measures to combat the dissemination of racist and anti-Semitic material via the Internet as well as in printed or otherwise mediatized form that could be utilized throughout the OSCE region;

26. Deplores the continuing intellectualization of anti-Semitism, racism and other forms of intolerance in academic spheres, particularly through publications and public events at universities;

27. Condemns the association of politicians and political parties with discriminatory platforms, and reaffirms that such actions violate human rights standards;

28. Notes the legislative efforts, public awareness campaigns, and other initiatives of some participating States to recognize the historical injustices of the transatlantic slave trade, study the enslavement of Roma, and commemorate the Holocaust;

29. Urges other states to take similar steps in recognizing the impact of past injustices on current day practices and beliefs as a means of providing a platform to address anti-Semitism and other forms of intolerance;

30. Suggests guidelines on academic responsibility to ensure the protection of Jewish and other minority students from harassment, discrimination, and abuse in the academic environment;

31. Urges participating States to implement the commitments following the original 2003 Vienna Conferences on Anti-Semitism and on Racism, Xenophobia and Discrimination and subsequent conferences that include calls to:

a. provide the proper legal framework and authority to combat anti-Semitism and other forms of intolerance;

b. collect, analyse, publish, and promote hate crimes data;

c. protect religious facilities and communitarian institutions, including Jewish sites of worship;

d. promote national guidelines on educational work to promote tolerance and combat anti-Semitism, including Holocaust education;

e. train law enforcement officers and military personnel to interact with diverse communities and address hate crimes, including community policing efforts;

f. appoint ombudspersons or special commissioners with the necessary resources to adequately monitor and address anti-Semitism and other forms of intolerance;

g. work with civil society to develop and implement tolerance initiatives;

32. Urges parliamentarians and the participating States to report their initiatives to combat anti-Semitism and other forms of intolerance and publicly recognize the benefits of diversity at the 2008 Annual Session;

33. Commends all parliamentary efforts on combating all forms of intolerance, especially the British All-Party Parliamentary Inquiry into Anti-Semitism and its final report;

34. Emphasizes the key role of politicians and political parties in combating intolerance by raising awareness of the value of diversity as a source of mutual enrichment of societies, and calls attention to the importance of integration with respect for diversity as a key element in promoting mutual respect and understanding;

35. Calls upon OSCE PA delegates to encourage regular debates on the subjects of anti-Semitism and other forms of intolerance in their national parliaments, following the example of the All-Party Parliamentary Inquiry into Anti- Semitism;

36. Calls upon journalists to develop a self-regulated code of ethics for addressing anti-Semitism, racism, discrimination against Muslims, and other forms of intolerance within the media;

37. Expresses its concern at all attempts to target Israeli institutions and individuals for boycotts, divestments and sanctions;

38. Urges implementation of the Resolution on Roma Education unanimously adopted at the OSCE PA 2002 Berlin Annual Session to "eradicate practices that segregate Roma in schooling'' and provide equal access to education that includes intercultural education;

39. Calls upon parliamentarians and other elected officials to publicly speak out against discrimination, violence and other manifestations of intolerance against Roma, Sinti, Jews, and other ethnic or religious groups;

40. Urges the participating States to ensure the timely provision of resources and technical support and the establishment of an administrative support structure to assist the three Personal Representatives of the Chair-in- Office in their work to promote greater tolerance and combat racism, xenophobia and discrimination;

41. Encourages the three Personal Representatives of the Chair-in-Office to address the Assembly's Winter Meetings and Annual Sessions on their work to promote greater tolerance and combat racism, xenophobia, and discrimination throughout the OSCE region;

42. Recognizes the unique contribution that the Mediterranean Partners for Co-operation could make to OSCE efforts to promote greater tolerance and combat anti-Semitism, racism, xenophobia and discrimination, including by supporting the ongoing work of the three Personal Representatives of the Chair-in-Office;

43. Reminds participating States that respect for freedom of thought, conscience, religion or belief should assist in combating all forms of intolerance with the ultimate goal of building positive relationships among all people, furthering social justice, and attaining world peace;

44. Reminds participating States that, historically, violations of freedom of thought, conscience, religion or belief have, through direct or indirect means, led to war, human suffering, and divisions between and among nations and peoples;

45. Condemns the rising violence in the OSCE region against persons believed to be Muslim and welcomes the conference to be held in Cordoba in October 2007 on combating discrimination against Muslims;

46. Calls upon parliamentarians and the participating States to ensure and facilitate the freedom of the individual to profess and practice any religion or belief, alone or in community with others, through transparent and non- discriminatory laws, regulations, practices and policies, and to remove any registration or recognition policies that discriminate against any religious community and hinder its ability to operate freely and equally with other faiths;

47. Encourages an increased focus by participating States on the greater role teenagers and young adults can play in combating anti-Semitism and other forms of intolerance and urges participating States to collect data and report on hate crimes committed by persons under the age of 24 and to promote tolerance initiatives through education, workforce training, youth organizations, sports clubs, and other organized activities;

48. Reminds participating States that this year marks the 59th Anniversary of the United Nations Human Rights Commission's adoption of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, which has served as the inspiration for numerous international treaties and declarations on tolerance issues;

49. Calls upon participating States to reaffirm and implement the sentiments expressed in the 2000 Bucharest Declaration and in this resolution as a testament to their commitment to "respect human rights and fundamental freedoms, including the freedom of thought, conscience, religion or belief, for all without distinction as to race, sex, language or religion'', as enshrined in the Helsinki Final Act;

50. Expresses deep concern at the glorification of the Nazi movement, including the erection of monuments and memorials and the holding of public demonstrations glorifying the Nazi past, the Nazi movement and neo- Nazism;

51. Also stresses that such practices fuel contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and contribute to the spread and multiplication of various extremist political parties, movements and groups, including neo-Nazis and skinhead groups;

52. Emphasizes the need to take the necessary measures to put an end to the practices described above, and calls upon participating States to take more effective measures to combat these phenomena and the extremist movements, which pose a real threat to democratic values. -(Honourable Senator Di Nino)

No. 12. (one) (inquiry)

April 8, 2008-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Hubley, calling the attention of the Senate to the current state of maternity and parental benefits in Canada, to the challenges facing working Canadians who decide to have children, and to the options for improving federal benefits programs to address these challenges.-(Honourable Senator Trenholme Counsell)

No. 15. (two) (inquiry)

June 16, 2008-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Segal, calling the attention of the Senate to

(a) the capacity of Canada and its allies to understand, measure and contain Iranian state-sponsored preparations for war throughout the Iraq, Afghanistan and Middle East regions; and

(b) the capacity of Canada to support allied efforts should a broad, multi-front war break out.-(Honourable Senator Tardif)

No. 69. (six) (motion)

December 5, 2007-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Grafstein, seconded by the Honourable Senator Callbeck:

That the Senate urge the Government to establish a National Portrait Gallery in the National Capital Region without delay. -(Honourable Senator Tkachuk)

No. 7. (six) (inquiry)

December 13, 2007-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Stollery, calling the attention of the Senate to the need for reforms to the Canadian International Development Agency.-(Honourable Senator Di Nino)

No. 8. (eight) (inquiry)

February 13, 2008-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Hubley, calling the attention of the Senate to questions concerning post-secondary education in Canada. -(Honourable Senator Andreychuk)

No. 11. (nine) (inquiry)

February 14, 2008-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Carstairs, P.C., calling the attention of the Senate to the custom of allowing Senate Public Bills to be considered free of the procedural obstacles that limit the consideration of Private Members' Bills in the other place, and the custom of ensuring all Senators the fair opportunity to have their proposals decided by the Senate.-(Honourable Senator Comeau)

No. 13. (ten) (inquiry)

March 4, 2008-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Di Nino, calling the attention of the Senate to the voting age in Canada for federal elections and referendums.-(Honourable Senator Cowan)

No. 6. (ten) (motion)

October 30, 2007-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Segal, seconded by the Honourable Senator Keon:

WHEREAS the Canadian public has never been consulted on the structure of its government (Crown, Senate and House of Commons)

AND WHEREAS there has never been a clear and precise expression by the Canadian public on the legitimacy of the Upper House since the constitutional agreement establishing its existence

AND WHEREAS a clear and concise opinion might be obtained by putting the question directly to the electors by means of a referendum

THAT the Senate urge the Governor in Council to obtain by means of a referendum, pursuant to section 3 of the Referendum Act, the opinion of the electors of Canada on whether the Senate should be abolished; and

THAT a message be sent to the House of Commons requesting that House to unite with the Senate for the above purpose. -(Honourable Senator Cowan)

No. 14. (eleven) (inquiry)

May 6, 2008-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Tardif, calling the attention of the Senate to the present state of linguistic rights in Canada and on the development of official-language minority communities. -(Honourable Senator Champagne, P.C.)

No. 68. (twelve) (motion)

February 26, 2008-Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Pépin:

That this House urge the Government to reconsider its decision not to appeal the death sentence of Ronald Smith, a Canadian citizen, who is on death row in a prison in Montana, and seek from the American authorities a commutation to life imprisonment; and

That the Government abides by the basic principle of the sanctity of life and commit itself to supporting, at all international forums, the abolition of the death penalty in the full knowledge that this country abolished capital punishment more than 30 years ago.-(Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C.)

No. 4. (two) (inquiry)

November 27, 2007-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Comeau, calling the attention of the Senate to the debilitating nature of arthritis and its effect on all Canadians.-(Honourable Senator Tkachuk)

No. 10. (fourteen) (inquiry)

February 5, 2008-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Oliver, calling the attention of the Senate to the progress that has been made on the implementation of the Federal Accountability Act, highlighting the status of key measures of the Act and underscoring the importance of this Act to improving responsibility and accountability in our government.-(Honourable Senator Banks)

No. 16. (four) (inquiry)

May 1, 2008-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Carstairs, P.C., calling the attention of the Senate to the recent report on the Human Rights of Parliamentarians at the meeting of the Inter-Parliamentary Union in Cape Town, South Africa, April 2008.-(Honourable Senator Prud'homme, P.C.)

No. 9. (four) (inquiry)

January 31, 2008-Resuming debate on the inquiry of the Honourable Senator Carstairs, P.C., calling the attention of the Senate to the reasons for the high attrition rate of Foreign Service Officers and others who serve in Canadian Embassies abroad, most particularly the failure of this and past governments to recognize the rights of the partners of these employees. -(Honourable Senator Comeau)


NOTICE PAPER

INQUIRIES

No. 18. (five)

By the Honourable Senator Grafstein:

May 14, 2008-That he will call the attention of the Senate to the current credit crisis, its impact on Canadian financial services, and what reforms the Government of Canada and others might consider to avoid similar financial shocks in the future.


MOTIONS

No. 105. (ten)

By the Honourable Senator Hervieux-Payette, P.C.:

May 6, 2008-Whereas Elections Canada is an independent and non-partisan body mandated by Parliament to administer all aspects of federal elections;

Whereas Elections Canada carries out its mandate fairly, openly and professionally;

Whereas Elections Canada has an impeccable international reputation and has been asked to provide electoral assistance in countries around the world by, among others, the United Nations, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the Organization of American States, La Francophonie and the Commonwealth;

Whereas since 1980 Elections Canada has organized some 400 international development missions in 100 countries in response to such requests;

Whereas Elections Canada enjoys a national and international reputation for excellence that is above reproach;

Whereas Canadians should be able to have confidence that the next federal election will be administered freely, fairly and openly by Elections Canada;

That the Senate therefore express its full and unswerving confidence in Elections Canada and the Commissioner of Canada Elections.

No. 107. (eight)

By the Honourable Senator Murray, P.C.:

May 8, 2008-That,

WHEREAS an amendment to the Constitution of Canada may be made by proclamation issued by the Governor General under the Great Seal of Canada where so authorized by resolutions of the Senate and House of Commons and of the legislative assemblies of the provinces as provided for in section 38 of the Constitution Act, 1982;

AND WHEREAS it is desirable to amend the Constitution of Canada to provide for a better balance of western regional representation in the Senate;

AND WHEREAS it is desirable that the 24 seats in the Senate currently representing the division of the western provinces be distributed among the prairie provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta, and that British Columbia be made a separate division represented by 12 Senators;

NOW, THEREFORE, the Senate resolves that an amendment to the Constitution of Canada be authorized to be made by proclamation issued by Her Excellency the Governor General under the Great Seal of Canada in accordance with the schedule hereto.

SCHEDULE

AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION OF CANADA

1. Sections 21 and 22 of the Constitution Act, 1867 are replaced by the following:

"21. The Senate shall, subject to the Provisions of this Act, consist of One hundred and seventeen Members, who shall be styled Senators.

22. In relation to the Constitution of the Senate, Canada shall be deemed to consist of Five Divisions:

1. Ontario;

2. Quebec;

3. The Maritime Provinces, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island;

4. The Prairie Provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta;

5. British Columbia;

which Five Divisions shall (subject to the Provisions of this Act) be represented in the Senate as follows: Ontario by Twenty-four Senators; Quebec by Twenty-four Senators; the Maritime Provinces and Prince Edward Island by Twenty-four Senators, Ten thereof representing Nova Scotia, Ten thereof representing New Brunswick, and Four thereof representing Prince Edward Island; the Prairie Provinces by Twenty-four Senators, Seven thereof representing Manitoba, Seven thereof representing Saskatchewan, and Ten thereof representing Alberta; British Columbia by Twelve Senators; Newfoundland and Labrador shall be entitled to be represented in the Senate by Six Senators; Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut shall be entitled to be represented in the Senate by One Senator each.

In the Case of Quebec, each of the Twenty-four Senators representing that Province shall be appointed for One of the Twenty-four Electoral Divisions of Lower Canada specified in Schedule A. to Chapter One of the Consolidated Statutes of Canada.''

2. Sections 26 to 28 of the Act are replaced by the following:

"26. If at any Time on the Recommendation of the Governor General the Queen thinks fit to direct that Five or Ten Members be added to the Senate, the Governor General may by Summons to Five or Ten qualified Persons (as the Case may be), representing equally the Five Divisions of Canada, add to the Senate accordingly.

27. In case of such Addition being at any Time made, the Governor General shall not summon any Person to the Senate, except on a further like Direction by the Queen on the like Recommendation, to represent one of the Five Divisions until such Division is represented by Twenty-four Senators or, in the case of British Columbia, Twelve Senators, and no more.

28. The Number of Senators shall not at any Time exceed One hundred and twenty-seven.''

CITATION

3. This Amendment may be cited as the Constitution Amendment, [year of proclamation] (western provincial representation in the Senate).

No. 120. (one)

By the Honourable Senator Joyal, P.C.:

June 18, 2008-That, at 3 o'clock p.m. on Thursday, June 11, 2009, the Senate resolve itself into a committee of the whole in order to hear from Phil Fontaine, National Chief Assembly of First Nations; Patrick Brazeau, National Chief of the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples; Mary Simon, President of the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami; and Clem Chartier, President of the Metis National Council, for the purpose of reporting on progress made on commitments endorsed by parliamentarians of both Chambers during the year following the Government's apology to former students of Indian Residential Schools.


QUESTIONS

No. 1.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

October 17, 2007-With respect to government decentralization:

A. Could the Government of Canada provide a copy of any reports and/or briefing notes that have been prepared since December 2003 for the Prime Minister or any other minister regarding proposals to relocate government departments (or parts thereof), agencies and Crown corporations from the National Capital area to the regions of Canada?

B. Could the Government of Canada provide reports and/or briefing notes prepared by any government department since December 2003 assessing which government departments (or parts thereof), agencies or Crown corporations could be relocated from the National Capital area to the regions of Canada?

No. 5.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

October 17, 2007-Over $230 million has been invested in the Canada Summer and Winter Games since inception. From track and field complexes to ski hills, soccer pitches to swimming pools, a legacy of sports facilities have been built up in 19 medium-sized communities across Canada.

A. Could the Government of Canada provide all statistics, documents, briefing notes, or assessments regarding the Canada Games Financial Framework including:

i) the procedural guidelines for inflationary adjustments; and

ii) a description of acceptable "essential operating'' costs?

B. Could the Government of Canada provide the total amount actually spent on the 2005 Canada Summer Games in Regina?

C. Could the Government of Canada provide all statistics, documents, briefing notes, or assessments regarding its financial commitment to the 2009 Canada Summer Games in Prince Edward Island including:

i) the present financial contribution; and

ii) the total proposed financial contribution?

No. 7.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

October 17, 2007-In 1997, the North American Free Trade Agreement Technical Working Group (TWG) on Pesticides was established to serve as a focal point for addressing pesticide related issues. The TWG's primary objective is to facilitate cost effective pesticide regulation and trade among Canada, Mexico, and the United States through harmonization.

A. Could the Government of Canada provide all statistics, documents, briefing notes, or assessments from January 2004 to September 2007 on the following:

i) How many cases exist where Canadian pesticide standards have been lowered in order to harmonize regulations with the United States?

ii) How many cases exist where Canadian pesticide standards have been increased in order to harmonize regulations with the United States?

iii) How many products were affected from lowering Canadian pesticide standards in order to harmonize pesticide regulations with the United States?

iv) How many products were affected from increasing Canadian pesticide standards in order to harmonize pesticide regulations with the United States?

v) What are the standards Canadian officials use to determine whether or not to lower pesticide standards?

vi) What percentage of Canadian pesticide residue levels are stricter than American standards?

vii) What percentage of products in Canada are found to exceed legal residue limits?

No. 10.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

October 17, 2007-With regard to the Government of Canada's Use of Employment Services:

A. Could the Government of Canada provide the total costs associated with the use of headhunters, executive recruiters, and employment agencies in hiring exempt political staff since January 2006 for the following:

i) Ministerial Offices

ii) Prime Minister's Office

B. Could the Government of Canada provide the following information pertaining to the use of headhunters, executive recruiters, and employment agencies for Governor in Council appointments:

i) What was the total number of individuals recruited using employment services since January 2006?

ii) How many of these individuals were appointed?

iii) What vacant positions were these individuals expected to fill?

iv) What was the total cost for using various employment services?

No. 14.

By the Honourable Senator Downe:

October 24, 2007-1. With respect to Burma:

Under the military junta, Burma has achieved one of the worst human rights records in the world. Over three decades of military dictatorship has led to widespread suppression of democratic ideals such as freedom of speech, association, assembly and the murder of innocent people. Could the Government of Canada provide all emails, correspondences, briefing notes, or assessments regarding its position on the following:

A. What measures is the Government of Canada taking to ensure Canadian corporations end all commercial ties with Burma?

B. What measures is the Government of Canada taking to ensure that no additional commercial contracts form between Canadian companies and Burma?

C. What domestic steps is the Government of Canada pursuing to guarantee those Canadian corporations financially benefiting from economic activity in Burma are restricted from securing any contracts from the Government of Canada?

D. What steps is the Government of Canada taking to assure the Canadian Pension Plan Investment Board does not maintain any direct or indirect holdings in companies conducting business with Burma?

E. What bilateral and multilateral efforts is the Government of Canada using to persuade Burma's military junta to relinquish power?

F. What diplomacy is occurring between the Government of Canada and members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, China, and India to pressure Burma's military junta to end violence against the people of Burma?

G. What methods is the Government of Canada employing to pressure Burma's military junta to release Aung San Suu Kyi, the leader of the National League for Democracy party?

No. 15.

By the Honourable Senator Callbeck:

October 25, 2007-1. In June 2005, Prime Minister Stephen Harper committed in writing that "A Conservative Government would immediately extend the Veterans Independence Program services to the widows of all Second World War and Korean War veterans regardless of when the Veteran passed away or how long they had been receiving the benefit prior to passing away.''

(a) Since January 1, 2006, have officials in the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Finance or the Treasury Board Secretariat prepared any estimates of the cost of extending the program to all surviving spouses of all Second World War and Korean War veterans regardless of when the Veteran passed away or how long they had been receiving the benefit prior to passing away?

(b) If so, would you provide the costs identified in any estimates that were prepared, the time frame in which the estimates were prepared, and the assumptions that were used to calculate each estimate?

2. Have other similar estimates been prepared for an expanded program using different assumptions or eligibility rules? If so, would you provide the estimates, together with the assumptions on which they are based?

3. At a meeting of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs on June 8, 2006, the Minister of Veterans Affairs used an estimate of $500 million annually to expand the Veterans Independence Program to all those (veterans, spouses and caregivers) who are currently ineligible.

(a) Was this estimate provided by officials in the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Finance or the Treasury Board Secretariat? If not, who prepared it?

(b) Would you provide a copy of at least one departmental memo, briefing note or other document that contains the estimate the Minister used at the committee meeting?

Please note that I wish to receive a response within 45 days of tabling these questions.

No. 16.

By the Honourable Senator Callbeck:

October 31, 2007-1. What were the total net assets of the Canada Pension Plan fund at the end of the most recent fiscal year? What portion of these assets was in the form of cash?

2. What was the total amount of benefits paid out during the most recent fiscal year?

3. Would you provide the latest actuarial assessment of the Canada Pension Plan fund with respect to its capacity to meet anticipated demand for benefits?

(a) When was this assessment performed?

(b) When is the next assessment planned?

4. Does the most recent actuarial assessment methodology include any assumptions that a certain number or a certain portion of eligible persons will fail to apply for the benefit?

(a) Does the methodology assume a 100 per cent application rate?

(b) If any other assumptions were made about application rates, what were those assumptions?

(c) If application rates were to approach 100 per cent, would this alter the actuarial assessment of the fund?

5. In the past 5 years, have officials at Canada Pension Plan, Finance Canada, Treasury Board Secretariat or Human Resources and Social Development Canada performed any assessment or estimate of the cost of making changes to the limitation on benefits paid retroactive from the date of application?

(a) If so, would you provide the resulting assessments and/or estimates?

(b) If so, would you provide any evaluation that was made about the impact of each option on the actuarial soundness of the Plan?

6. Has any assessment or estimate been made of the cost of matching the Quebec Pension Plan's policy of making retroactive payments for up to 60 months?

(a) If so, would you provide the resulting assessments and/or estimates?

(b) If so, would you provide any evaluation that was made about the impact of each option on the actuarial soundness of the Plan?

7. Has any assessment or estimate been made of the cost of removing the limit altogether, and allowing applicants to receive payment for all retroactive benefits?

(a) If so, would you provide the resulting assessments and/or estimates?

(b) If so, would you provide any evaluation that was made about the impact of each option on the actuarial soundness of the Plan?

8. If the impact evaluations requested were not performed, is it a reasonable to assume that there would be no impact, owing to the fact that the actuarial assessment assumes a 100 per cent application rate?

Please note that I wish to receive a response within 45 days of tabling these questions.

No. 17.

By the Honourable Senator Callbeck:

November 13, 2007-1. In November 2003, the Prime Minister's Task Force on Women Entrepreneurs released its final report and recommendations. During its hearings, Task Force members heard repeatedly that women entrepreneurs would gladly pay into Employment Insurance (EI) if they would have access to maternity and parental benefits. As such, the Task Force made one recommendation with regard to the expansion of parental leave for women entrepreneurs:

Recommendation 4.01: The federal government should extend maternity leave benefits to self-employed women.

(a) Have officials in Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC), the Department of Finance or the Treasury Board Secretariat prepared any estimates of the cost of extending the Employment Insurance (EI) maternity and parental benefits to self-employed women?

(b) If so, would you provide the costs identified in any estimates that were prepared, the time frame in which the estimates were prepared, and the assumptions that were used to calculate each estimate?

(c) Has HRSDC examined other program models which could provide maternity and parental benefits to self- employed women? If so, would you provide the full results of these examinations?

2. In March 2005, the Governments of Canada and Quebec concluded a final agreement on Quebec's Parental Insurance Plan. This agreement provided the administrative, financial and operational provisions for Quebec to establish its own plan which includes maternity and parental benefits for self-employed persons.

(a) How have officials in HRSDC, the Department of Finance or the Treasury Board Secretariat followed the implementation of this agreement? Would you provide any reports, reviews or other materials that discuss the implementation and transition period?

(b) Have any other provinces or territories expressed an interest in establishing a similar agreement with the federal government?

(c) Have officials in HRSDC, the Department of Finance or the Treasury Board Secretariat prepared any estimates of the cost of establishing a similar agreement in any or all provinces and territories?

(d) If so, would you provide the costs identified in any estimates that were prepared, the time frame in which the estimates were prepared, and the assumptions that were used to calculate each estimate?

3. On September 27, 2006, a deferred response was tabled to an oral question regarding maternity benefits for women entrepreneurs which I raised in the Senate. The response, in part, states: "Government supports available to women entrepreneurs and more specifically, the potential to extend the Employment Insurance (EI) maternity and parental programming to this population are significant issues that warrant ongoing discussion.''

(a) Have officials in HRSDC been engaged in any recent activities or ongoing discussions with respect to the extension of maternity and parental benefits to women entrepreneurs? If so, would you please describe them?

Please note that I wish to receive a response within 45 days of tabling these questions.

No. 22.

By the Honourable Senator Cordy:

January 30, 2008-The Harper Government commissioned an independent advisor, Daniel Paillé, to probe polling contracts conducted by the previous government. The advisor had also included in his study the polling practices of the current government and found that the current Conservative government outspent all past governments on public- opinion research with spending of 31.2 million dollars for 546 contracts, averaging over two polls per business day.

The government received Mr. Paillé's report in October, 2007 but did not release the report to the public until December 13th, 2007.

A. How many polls did the Government of Canada commission between the time the report was received and December 13th, 2007?

B. How much did the Government of Canada spend on public-opinion research between the time the report was received and December 13th, 2007?

C. How many polls has the Government of Canada commissioned since the time the report was made public on December 13th, 2007?

D. How much did the Government of Canada spend on public-opinion research since the time the report was made public on December 13th, 2007?

No. 24.

By the Honourable Senator Chaput:

February 12, 2008-About the New Horizons for Seniors Program:

The aim of the New Horizons Program is to keep seniors contributing actively to their community by encouraging them to share their skills and experiences. The projects resulting from the Program also make it possible to reduce the risk of social isolation. Every year, Human Resources and Social Development Canada launches a call for applications for funding under the Program. For a better understanding of the way the Government of Canada's selection process works, it may be necessary to obtain more information.

1. Could the Government of Canada provide us with a list of all projects funded under the New Horizons for Seniors Program since January 2006?

2. Could the Government of Canada provide us with a complete list of all organizations that have applied for funding under the New Horizons Program since January 2006? Could it also give us contact information for these organizations?

3. Could the Government of Canada provide us with a list of the national criteria used to assess funding applications submitted under the New Horizons Program?

4. In the context of the New Horizons Program for Seniors, the provinces and territories are responsible for setting priorities depending on the needs of their communities, and the activities proposed under the Program must reflect these priorities to be eligible for funding.

a) Were the provinces and territories required to submit their priorities to the federal government?

b) If so, how many have done so?

c) Could we obtain a list of the priorities submitted, by province and territory?

No. 26.

By the Honourable Senator Fraser:

February 26, 2008-1) Could the Minister of Public Works provide information on the government's policy concerning the hours when computers must be left on?

2) How much energy is consumed by computers in federal government buildings being left on during off-peak hours (i.e. evenings, weekends, and statutory holidays)?

3) If it is not possible to completely shut down computers during these time periods, will the Minister of Public Works adopt a policy of purchasing Renewable Energy Certificates to offset this energy use and invest in renewable energy projects?

No. 30.

By the Honourable Senator Chaput:

March 6, 2008-With respect to the government's use of census questions on language behaviour:

Data collected in the census aims to provide a snapshot of the country and its people. The government and its departments use these statistics to gain a better understanding of the needs of Canadians. The future of official- language minority communities depends largely on the programs and services developed by the government's various departments and agencies. To better understand the link between the statistical results and the programs and services introduced by the government, more information on the use of the census results is needed.

1. Can the Government of Canada tell us if the Canada Public Service Agency uses the census data to fund programs and services that support official-language minority communities?

2. Can the Government of Canada provide us with a list of Public Service Agency programs and services that use the language data collected through the census to develop and fund its programs and services?

3. Can the Government of Canada tell us if the Public Service Agency uses the following data collected through the census:

  • The figures reported under the heading "mother tongue,'' i.e., people who identify English or French as the first language learned and still understood?

  • The figures reported for the language most often spoken at home?

  • The figures reported for the language spoken regularly at home?

  • The figures reported for the language most often spoken at work?

  • The figures reported for the language spoken regularly at work?

4. Can the Government of Canada provide us with a list of Public Service Agency programs and services that support official-language minority communities that are not funded based on census data?

5. If the Public Service Agency does not use census data to fund these programs or services, can the Government of Canada tell us what data the Agency uses to develop programs and services that support official-language minority communities?

6. If the Public Service Agency does not use data from the census or other sources, can the Government of Canada tell us how the Agency decides on the level of funding to be provided for programs and services that support official-language minority communities?

7. Can the Government of Canada tell us which census year the Public Service Agency uses to analyze language data in order to determine funding for programs and services that support official-language minority communities?

No. 33.

By the Honourable Senator Spivak:

April 9, 2008-Of the National Capital Commission: In a letter dated September 14, 2007, the former Chief Executive Officer of the National Capital Commission wrote that the NCC had informed the Quebec government of its position that it, the NCC, owns the lands located in the Lac la Pêche section of Gatineau Park which it obtained through a 1973 exchange for the lands where the Cégep de l'Outaouais is located.

1) By what means or document did the NCC express that position to the Quebec government?

2) What are the full contents of that document?

3) Did the Quebec government respond?

4) If so, what are the full contents of the Quebec government's response(s)?

5) And can the NCC provide copies of any exchange of correspondence in this regard?

6) Does the NCC make payments in lieu of taxes to the Municipality of La Pêche for the Gatineau Park lands it acquired from the Quebec government in 1973; if so, for how many properties does it make those payments; what is the amount paid for each property; and what is the total amount of payments in lieu of taxes for those lands?

No. 35.

By the Honourable Senator Chaput:

June 10, 2008-With respect to applications for permanent residence processed in Canadian visa offices;

The application process for permanent residence is very complex and, like all immigration policies in Canada, they are a shared responsibility between the federal and provincial governments. Permanent residence applications can be both costly and lengthy, and the requirements and the process are sometimes hard to understand. The following questions will help us better understand the experiences of candidates who begin the process to become permanent residents of Canada.

1. Can the Government of Canada identify and explain the steps of the application process to obtain a Permanent Resident Card?

2. Can the Government of Canada identify the selection criteria used to obtain a Permanent Resident Card?

3. Can the Government of Canada give us the number of permanent residence applications processed by Canadian visa offices in 2005, 2006 and 2007?

4. Can the Government of Canada give us the percentage of permanent residence applications processed outside Canada in 2005, 2006 and 2007?

5. Can the Government of Canada tell us:

The number of candidates invited to an interview in person with a Canadian visa office agent during the permanent residence application process?

The percentage of candidates invited to an interview in person with a Canadian visa office agent during the permanent residence application process?

The number of candidates who met in person with a Canadian visa office agent or other Canadian government delegate during the application process and who subsequently obtained a Permanent Resident Card?

The percentage of candidates who met in person with a Canadian visa office agent or other Canadian government delegate during the application process and who subsequently obtained a Permanent Resident Card?

The number of candidates who obtained a Permanent Resident Card without having to meet with a Canadian visa office agent or other Canadian government delegate?

The percentage of candidates who obtained a Permanent Resident Card without having to meet with a Canadian visa office agent or other Canadian government delegate?

The number of candidates who did not obtain a Permanent Resident Card and who met with a Canadian visa office agent or other Canadian government delegate during the application process?

The percentage of candidates who did not obtain a Permanent Resident Card and who met with a Canadian visa office agent or other Canadian government delegate during the application process?

The number of candidates who did not obtain a Permanent Resident Card and who did not meet with a Canadian visa office agent or other Canadian government delegate during the application process?

The percentage of candidates who did not obtain a Permanent Resident Card and who did not meet with a Canadian visa office agent or other Canadian government delegate during the application process?



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