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1st Session, 42nd Parliament,
Volume 150, Issue 137

Thursday, June 22, 2017
The Honourable George J. Furey, Speaker

THE SENATE

Thursday, June 22, 2017

The Senate met a 10:30 a.m., the Speaker in the chair.

Prayers.

[Translation]

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

Justice and Attorney General

Federal Ombudsman for the Victims of Crime—2015-16 Annual Report Tabled

Hon. Peter Harder (Government Representative in the Senate): Honourable senators, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the 2015-16 Annual Report of the Office of the Federal Ombudsman for the Victims of Crime.

[English]

Export Development

Canada Account Operations—2015-16 Annual Report Tabled

Hon. Peter Harder (Government Representative in the Senate): Honourable senators, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the report from Export Development Canada on Canada Account Operations for the fiscal year 2015-16.

[Translation]

Senate Ethics Officer

2016-17 Annual Report Tabled

The Hon. the Speaker: Honourable senators, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the report of the Senate Ethics Officer for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2017, pursuant to the Parliament of Canada Act.

Study on the Effects of Transitioning to a Low Carbon Economy

Tenth Report of Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources Committee Tabled

Hon. Paul J. Massicotte: Honourable senators, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the tenth report (interim) of the Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources, entitled Decarbonizing Transportation in Canada.

(On motion of Senator Massicotte, report placed on the Orders of the Day for consideration at the next sitting of the Senate.)

Preclearance Bill, 2016

First Reading

The Hon. the Speaker informed the Senate that a message had been received from the House of Commons with Bill C-23, An Act respecting the preclearance of persons and goods in Canada and the United States.

(Bill read first time.)

The Hon. the Speaker: Honourable senators, when shall this bill be read the second time?

(On motion of Senator Harder, bill placed on the Orders of the Day for second reading two days hence.)

Gender Equality Week Bill

First Reading

The Hon. the Speaker informed the Senate that a message had been received from the House of Commons with Bill C-309, An Act to establish Gender Equality Week.

(Bill read first time.)

The Hon. the Speaker: Honourable senators, when shall this bill be read the second time?

(On motion of Senator Harder, bill placed on the Orders of the Day for second reading two days hence.)


ORDERS OF THE DAY

Business of the Senate

Hon. Diane Bellemare (Legislative Deputy to the Government Representative in the Senate): Honourable senators, pursuant to rule 4-13(3), I would like to inform the Senate that as we proceed with Government Business, the Senate will address the items in the following order: consideration of the message from the House of Commons concerning Bill C-44, followed by all remaining items in the order that they appear on the Order Paper.

(1040)

[English]

Budget Implementation Bill, 2017, No. 1

Message from Commons—Motion for Non-Insistence Upon Senate Amendments Adopted

The Senate proceeded to consideration of the message from the House of Commons concerning Bill C-44, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 22, 2017 and other measures:

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

ORDERED,— That a Message be sent to the Senate to acquaint their Honours that the House has disagreed with the amendments made by the Senate to Bill C-44, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 22, 2017, and other measures, because these amendments infringe upon rights and privileges of the House.

Hon. Peter Harder (Government Representative in the Senate): Your Honour, with leave, it is moved by me, the Honourable Senator Day and the Honourable Senator McCoy; seconded by the Honourable Senator Bellemare, the Honourable Senator Hubley and the Honourable Senator Omidvar:

That the Senate do not insist on its amendments to Bill C-44, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 22, 2017 and other measures, to which the House of Commons has disagreed, but that the Senate confirms its privileges, immunities and powers as provided under the Constitution to amend legislation, whatever its nature or source; and

That a message be sent to the House of Commons to acquaint that house accordingly.

Some Hon. Senators: Hear, hear!

The Hon. the Speaker: Is leave granted, honourable senators?

Hon. Senators: Agreed.

The Hon. the Speaker: It was moved by the Honourable Senator Harder, the Honourable Senator Day and the Honourable Senator McCoy; seconded by the Honourable Senator Bellemare, the Honourable Senator Hubley and the Honourable Senator Omidvar that — shall I dispense?

Hon. Senators: Dispense.

The Hon. the Speaker: Are senators ready for the question?

Senator Plett: No.

Motion to Refer to Committee Negatived

Hon. Donald Neil Plett: Honourable senators, I move:

That the motion, together with the message from the House of Commons on the same subject dated June 21, 2017, be referred to the Standing Senate Committee on National Finance for consideration and report; and

That the committee submit its report no later than June 30, 2017.

The Hon. the Speaker: On debate?

Are honourable senators ready for the question?

Some Hon. Senators: Question!

The Hon. the Speaker: Is it your pleasure, honourable senators, to adopt the motion?

Some Hon. Senators: No.

Some Hon. Senators: Yes.

The Hon. the Speaker: All those in favour of the motion will please say "yea."

Some Hon. Senators: Yea.

The Hon. the Speaker: All those opposed will please say "nay."

Some Hon. Senators: Nay.

The Hon. the Speaker: In my opinion the "nays" have it.

And two honourable senators having risen:

The Hon. the Speaker: I see two senators rising. Do we have an agreement on a bell?

Some Hon. Senators: Now.

The Hon. the Speaker: Honourable senators will know that the only way we can consider it now is with leave and obviously we're not getting leave, so we'll have a one-hour bell.

Senator Plett: No, we would like to vote now as well, Your Honour.

The Hon. the Speaker: Can we do it now, honourable senators?

Hon. Senators: Agreed.

The Hon. the Speaker: All those in favour of the motion will please rise.

Motion negatived on the following division:

YEAS
THE HONOURABLE SENATORS

Andreychuk McIntyre
Ataullahjan Ngo
Batters Ogilvie
Beyak Oh
Boisvenu Patterson
Carignan Plett
Dagenais Poirier
Doyle Runciman
Eaton Seidman
Enverga Smith
Housakos Stewart Olsen
Lang Tannas
MacDonald Tkachuk
Marshall Unger
Martin Wells
McInnis White—32

NAYS
THE HONOURABLE SENATORS

Baker Hartling
Bellemare Hubley
Bernard Joyal
Black Lankin
Boniface Lovelace Nicholas
Bovey Marwah
Campbell Massicotte
Christmas McCoy
Cools McPhedran
Cordy Mégie
Cormier Mercer
Dawson Mitchell
Day Moncion
Dean Omidvar
Dupuis Pate
Dyck Petitclerc
Eggleton Pratte
Forest Saint-Germain
Fraser Sinclair
Gagné Tardif
Galvez Wallin
Gold Watt
Greene Wetston
Griffin Woo—49
Harder

ABSTENTIONS
THE HONOURABLE SENATORS

Nil

(1050)

The Hon. the Speaker: Resuming debate on the motion by Senator Harder.

Some Hon. Senators: Question!

The Hon. the Speaker: It was moved by the Honourable Senator Harder, the Honourable Senator Day and the Honourable Senator McCoy; seconded by the Honourable Senator Bellemare, the Honourable Senator Hubley and the Honourable Senator Omidvar:

That the Senate do not insist on its amendments to Bill C-44, An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 22, 2017 and other measures, to which the House of Commons has disagreed, but that the Senate confirms its privileges, immunities and powers as provided under the Constitution to amend legislation, whatever its nature or source; and

That a message be sent to the House of Commons to acquaint that house accordingly.

Is it your pleasure, honourable senators, to adopt the motion?

Some Hon. Senators: Yes.

Some Hon. Senators: No.

The Hon. the Speaker: All those in favour of the motion will please say "yea."

Some Hon. Senators: Yea!

The Hon. the Speaker: All those opposed will please say "nay."

Some Hon. Senators: Nay!

The Hon. the Speaker: In my opinion, the "yeas" have it.

And two honourable senators having risen:

The Hon. the Speaker: I see two senators rising. Do we have an agreement on the bell?

Senator Plett: Now.

The Hon. the Speaker: Is leave granted, honourable senators?

Hon. Senators: Agreed.

The Hon. the Speaker: All those in favour of the motion will please rise.

Motion agreed to on the following division:

YEAS
THE HONOURABLE SENATORS

Baker Harder
Bellemare Hartling
Bernard Hubley
Black Joyal
Boniface Lankin
Bovey Lovelace Nicholas
Campbell Marwah
Christmas Massicotte
Cools McCoy
Cordy McPhedran
Cormier Mégie
Dawson Mercer
Day Mitchell
Dean Moncion
Duffy Omidvar
Dupuis Pate
Dyck Petitclerc
Eggleton Pratte
Forest Saint-Germain
Fraser Sinclair
Gagné Tardif
Galvez Wallin
Gold Watt
Greene Wetston
Griffin Woo—50

NAYS
THE HONOURABLE SENATORS

Andreychuk Mockler
Ataullahjan Ngo
Batters Ogilvie
Beyak Oh
Boisvenu Patterson
Carignan Plett
Dagenais Poirier
Doyle Runciman
Eaton Seidman
Enverga Smith
Housakos Stewart Olsen
Lang Tannas
MacDonald Tkachuk
Marshall Unger
Martin Wells
McInnis White—33
McIntyre

ABSTENTIONS
THE HONOURABLE SENATORS

Nil

(1100)

National Anthem Act

Bill to Amend—Third Reading—Motion in Amendment—Motion in Subamendment—Vote Further Deferred

On the Order:

Resuming debate on the motion of the Honourable Senator Lankin, P.C., seconded by the Honourable Senator Petitclerc, for the third reading of Bill C-210, An Act to amend the National Anthem Act (gender).

And on the motion in amendment of the Honourable Senator Beyak, seconded by the Honourable Senator Dagenais:

That Bill C-210 be not now read a third time, but that it be amended, on page 1, by adding the following after line 6:

"2 This Act comes into force on the later of July 1, 2017 and the day on which it receives royal assent.".

And on the subamendment of the Honourable Senator Batters, seconded by the Honourable Senator Oh:

That the motion in amendment moved by the Honourable Senator Beyak be amended by replacing the words "the later of July 1, 2017 and the day on which it receives royal assent" by the words "October 1, 2017".

The Hon. the Speaker: The question is as follows: It was moved by the Honourable Senator Batters, seconded by Honourable Senator Oh:

That the motion in amendment moved by the Honourable Senator Beyak be amended by replacing the words "the later of July 1, 2017 and the day on which it receives royal assent" by the words "October 1, 2017".

Hon. Donald Neil Plett: Your Honour, with leave of the Senate and notwithstanding rule 5-5(a), I move:

That the vote on the subamendment to Bill C-210, deferred to 5:30 pm today, be further deferred to 5:30 pm on the next day the Senate sits.

The Hon. the Speaker: Is it your pleasure, honourable senators, to adopt the motion?

(Motion agreed to, on division.)

(Vote deferred.)

The Honourable Daniel Lang

Expression of Thanks

Hon. Daniel Lang: Colleagues, I'd like to take a few minutes of our time before we rise for summer recess. After much reflection, I wish to inform you that I will be retiring from the Senate of Canada effective August 15, 2017.

After 27 years in public life, it has come time for me to move forward to another chapter in my life. I've been very fortunate to serve in elected office for five terms in the Yukon Legislative Assembly, starting in 1974 and ending in 1992, and now I have had the great honour of serving in the Senate for the last eight and a half years as "the senator from Yukon."

Hon. Senators: Hear, hear!

Senator Lang: In 2009 I was honoured to have been recommended by Premier Fentie, on behalf of the Government of Yukon, to the Right Honourable Prime Minister Stephen Harper for appointment to the Senate of Canada as Canada's eight hundred and ninety-first senator.

I have been privileged and honoured to serve with you here as the senator of Yukon on behalf of Canada. It has been rewarding to work with so many of you as we put our best foot forward on behalf of Canadians.

It seems like yesterday when I arrived, and one of my first orders of business was to sponsor in the Senate the repeal of the long-gun registry, which was so detested in rural and Northern Canada, and especially in Yukon.

During my time here, it was personally gratifying to have my office help advance many projects for Yukon, such as the expansion of the power plant in Mayo; the building of First Nations multicultural facilities in communities such as Haines Junction, Carcross and Whitehorse; and assisting in the building of many housing developments throughout Yukon, especially housing for seniors in rural communities.

In addition, much work was done over the last eight and a half years in the development of water treatment plants, especially, once again, in the small communities of Yukon.

A significant development over the course of those eight and a half years was the expansion of Yukon College and the establishment of the Centre for Northern Innovation in Mining at our post-secondary institution.

These are only a few of the projects that the federal government assisted with over the past eight and a half years during my tenure.

I have also enjoyed promoting Yukon in Ottawa, as many of you know, through my Yukon office and the famous Art Walk. As you know, I receive any visitors in my office to showcase Yukon artists, including Ted Harrison, whose work hangs in the Senate entrance and also in my office, as well as Jim Robb, Mary Caesar and many other First Nation works. Of course, I have to mention my favourite painter, and that's my wife.

Hon. Senators: Hear, hear!

Senator Lang: Honourable senators, I want to recognize my Senate colleagues with whom I have worked on Senate committees. I want to recognize the countless hours spent with Senator David Angus and Senator Richard Neufeld, who have chaired the Standing Senate Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources. I also want to recognize the reports that were completed, which have contributed significantly to the national dialogue on the question of energy, which is so important to our country.

I want to thank my colleagues for making my job as Chair of the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence so rewarding. Over the past four years we have dealt with serious issues related to the Canadian Armed Forces and national security threats to Canada.

Our significant reports, which have become a matter of record and have created a public conversation, include the terrorist threat that we face; the question of Canada's participation in ballistic missile defence of North America; sexual harassment and bullying within the RCMP; and issues facing the Canada Border Services Agency. We have now completed three significant defence policy reports — in-depth studies on peace support deployment under the United Nations; the funding of the military; and providing the Royal Canadian Air Force, the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian Army with essential tools to protect Canadians and support international deployment and humanitarian missions.

Colleagues, I am proud of our work on behalf of the women and men of the Canadian Armed Forces as well as veterans and our law enforcement agencies.

As I prepare to depart the Senate of Canada, I wish to recognize the committee staff, especially our translators, technicians and pages, who make all of our work possible.

I would be remiss if I did not single out our Defence Committee clerk, Adam Thompson, and his staff, who provided excellent service during my time as chair.

Closer to home, I want to recognize the officers of the Senate and their staff. I want to make special mention of the security and building staff at Victoria Building, especially Judith Frederick, who has kept my office in excellent condition, which was no small task.

Colleagues, I'm fast coming to a conclusion. I also want to recognize and thank my office staff, "Team Yukon," as I call them: my policy director, Naresh Raghubeer, who has been with my office for five years. His hard work and dedication has been one of the main reasons that our public hearings and Senate committee reports have been so successful. My executive assistant, Jennifer MacIver, who was recruited from Senator Gerstein's office upon his retirement, has been an excellent addition to Team Yukon.

Last, but not least, I wish to thank my best friend and wife, Valerie, who accompanied me on this journey and gave me so much support. Val and I are looking forward to going home to Yukon so we can spend more time with our children and grandchildren, and I can hold three-week-old Andrew Daniel every day.

I thank all of you for your friendship and support over the last eight and a half years. I wish you all the best in your future deliberations on behalf of Canada.

God bless Canada. God save the Queen.

(1110)

Expression of Thanks and Tributes

Hon. Peter Harder (Government Representative in the Senate): Honourable senators, before we suspend to await Royal Assent and then adjourn, I would like to say a few words of thanks.

Let me begin, because Senator Lang has just spoken, to thank him for his contributions to the Senate over the last eight and a half years, the last year and a half of which I have experienced personally and want to thank him for that.

I would also note, honourable senators, that three of our colleagues will not be here when we reconvene, if we reconvene, in September. Senators Baker, Runciman and Hubley reach that age from which we subtract our birthdays on an annual basis.

An Hon. Senator: Change the law.

Senator Harder: They have made an outstanding contribution to this chamber in their work. I read about it before I came to the chamber and I have experienced it firsthand. And, Senator Baker, I will be brief.

On behalf of the Senate and my role in the Senate, I would also like to thank all senators for your work, your cooperation and what we have achieved together over the course of the last session, if I could say that. Since January, this chamber has passed and given Royal Assent to 16 bills that were important to the Government of Canada. Five of those bills involved some degree of interaction with the other place in terms of the Senate providing advice, and that doesn't take into account those bills with which the advice was anticipated and changes made in legislation before it came here.

I mention this only because I do believe we are working on an appropriate relationship with the other chamber. With today's motion on the message, we have underscored the Senate's rights, obligations and responsibilities as well as the complementary nature of our relationship to the other chamber. I thank all senators who supported the motion and I, of course, understand the rights of those who did not.

I also want to briefly thank those who serve us day in and day out and who often go unrecognized. I won't enumerate all of them, but they go from the interpreters, to the stenographers, to the pages, to the behind-the-scenes staff of the table, of the custodial staff and of all those Senate employees who make us look good and reasonably efficient most of the time.

I would also like to, in particular, reference the table. Earlier in the week, we noted that our Clerk was given leave of the Senate to attend to a meeting on the other side. Since then, an announcement has been made and this will, therefore, be the final day for the Clerk in this function. I would like to thank him for his friendship, advice and loyalty over the years.

Hon. Senators: Hear, hear!

Senator Harder: Finally, honourable senators, I would like to acknowledge and thank the leadership with whom I have had the pleasure of working over the course of the last number of months: Senator Smith, Senator Day, Senator McCoy, the deputy leaders — the usual channels, as I say — and you, sir, as Speaker have served us well. Your advice, counsel and ability to manage the affairs of this chamber are much appreciated.

I wish you all a bit of a respite, and thank you all for the cooperation that you've shown.

Hon. Senators: Hear, hear!

Hon. Larry W. Smith (Leader of the Opposition): Honourable senators, a few words about Dan Lang.

I first met Dan when he said, "Larry, can you come up to Whitehorse and do something with the Special Olympics for a weekend?" I realized one thing, and I have great empathy for all of us who live long distances away. Montreal to Vancouver is 4.5 hours with a 1.5 hour layover, and then Vancouver up to Whitehorse. It's about 13 hours in total. When you realize what people go through to participate as members of Parliament and as senators, Dan is a perfect example of people who make sacrifices. Of course, that young lady up top who supports Dan has had to put up with it, but it is a demonstration of the commitment that each of us has as senators within this great institution.

Dan comes at you straight ahead. You know what you get as soon as you meet Dan, and you know what you will get in terms of working with him. That's outstanding. You get honest integrity right in your face.

That's what I love about you, Dan, because I know as a teammate, if you and I were playing together, I could trust that you were going to protect my back. At the same time, you've always demonstrated the leadership that's required to do important tasks. It's not easy to run a committee, and National Defence is a tough committee with tough issues, but I think you did a fine job in terms of working with people. You had divergent people and new people coming in; not easy. You didn't have consistency of people over time; you had change, and you managed change well. You have a great heart. You're a great person. I wish you well, Dan.

I would also like to thank people that really left an impression on me coming in. Of course, George Baker is one. The only other Baker I ever played against was Bill Baker "The Undertaker." He just about killed me every time I tried to hit him. He was 260 pounds, I was 210, and I was so stupid that I thought I could knock him down. You could never knock down George Baker because he was always going to be very brief with what he said.

Bob Runciman was called the "Mad Dog." I found that out.

(1120)

To me, he was a person who was very sage and gave great counsel. It must have been at that stage of your life that you finally figured: "I can be a mad dog in a different way." What a thinker, what a leader, what a career.

Senator Hubley is not here at present, but the contribution that these folks have made leaves us with a gap of corporate memory.

So for the new folks coming in, we are a team of people together, but it's important to recognize corporate memory, and the importance of people before us is always an important ingredient of how we learn to become outstanding senators.

Senator Runciman, Senator Hubley and Senator Baker, thank you very much for your contributions to the Senate.

Hon. Senators: Hear, hear!

Senator Smith: Your Honour, I would be remiss if I spoke too much longer because I want to be like George. He's my idol. I don't want to take too much of your time. Thank you for your outstanding leadership.

Speaker Furey and I, with Senator Marshall, were three of the people who were tasked with the great opportunity of dealing with the Auditor General for 14 to 18 months, and so we were well-tuned for that period of time, but I thank you for your great leadership and involvement as a senator and as our Speaker.

For the rest of us in this room, let's remember one thing: At the end of the day, we're working for one thing, the betterment of our country, Canada. That's why we're all here.

Have a great summer. We'll see you in the fall.

Hon. Senators: Hear, hear!

Hon. Joseph A. Day (Leader of the Senate Liberals): Thank you, Your Honour. On behalf of the independent Senate Liberals, I would like to join in the sentiments of my colleagues. All of the words that Senator Harder and Senator Smith have said we whole-heartedly endorse — well, almost all. I was thinking how nice and upbeat this was despite the announcement of the retirement of Senator Lang, but our loss is the Yukon's gain. We wish you well in that regard. Thank you very much for your service. I enjoyed serving with you, in particular the five hours every Monday on the National Security and Defence Committee.

Senator Smith mentioned the Auditor General, and that put a damper on everything here, I think. I still haven't gotten over that one.

Senator Runciman, serving in the Ontario legislature and then agreeing to continue to serve the people of Canada here, you've done a great job. I've enjoyed working with you. I wish you well. I look forward to seeing you in Brockville on the St. Lawrence one of these days.

Senator Baker served in the House of Commons for a good number of years, as you know. I first met him when he was a minister in the other place. He, as well, agreed to carry on and serve here and serve the people of Canada through this position.

George, we've enjoyed your time here, and we'll have a more formal send-off later in the year. We'll give you the summer to think of things, go prospecting, and then we'll see you in the fall.

Senator Hubley heard that we might say a couple of words, so she left. She wants to try to catch her flight home to that beautiful city of Charlottetown that we've heard so much about. We will try to have a reception in the fall to thank Senator Hubley, who served in the provincial legislature of Prince Edward Island and then came here as a senator.

Each of the individuals whom we've mentioned has brought a tremendous amount of experience, and it's important to have some of that political experience as well as the other experiences that we all bring because of the work that we have done.

I do want to join with the many nice and deserving statements that have been made about Charles Robert. Charles, we will miss you, but we know you're down the hall. You should be arriving just about the time that the message we sent today arrives. Maybe you could explain that to your new colleagues.

On behalf of the independent Liberals, I wish all of our support staff, all of the individual staff we have, the Senate staff and all of you a relaxing and enjoyable summer in all the diverse parts of this wonderful country. If anyone is passing by Hampton, New Brunswick — Saint John — Kennebecasis — I would love to see you. Have a good summer.

Hon. Senators: Hear, hear!

Hon. Elaine McCoy: Thank you, Your Honour. Let me add on behalf of the Independent Senators Group our very best wishes for all of you, and we are so sorry we're going to miss four of you in the fall.

In reverse alphabetical order, may I say, Senator Runciman, our colleagues who sat with you on committee continuously told us how well you ran that committee. You were fair, firm and absolutely an inspiration as to how business in this Senate can be run effectively, fairly and openly. So we want to make sure that we give you that accolade, apart from your quite robust and, shall we say, earthy sense of humour, which I'm not at liberty to repeat.

Senator Lang, we've known one another for quite some time, and I do know that you have a very definite point of view. As Senator Smith said, you are not at all shy about expressing that point of view. You definitely punch above your weight in that regard. But I've also known you to take new facts, new thoughts and new ideas into consideration and to modify your opinion and to be equally steadfast in portraying that position. I shall always value you for the wisdom you've shown in being able to expand your horizons, expand the basis for your decisions and judgment and to have a huge heart, which you apply in all of the things you do.

I wish Senator Hubley was here. It took me quite a while to get to know Senator Hubley because she is so quiet and modest, if I can put it that way. It was never apparent to me at the beginning, when I first joined the Senate, just how powerful a woman she was because she held so many of her skills and so much of her knowledge like a light under a bushel — and such a big bushel. I was never on the same committees with her, but we would get opportunities to talk with one another, especially when she took over the very onerous task of being the deputy leader to Senator Day, and my admiration just kept increasing. She was wise and compassionate. She will continue to be wise and compassionate.

I asked her yesterday what on earth she is going to do now that she's retiring. She rhymed off all the things like gardening and grandchildren. She's still on committees at home. She has a full plate and she's not stopping now. We wish her all the best, but we are going to miss her.

And George Baker, of course, is, in my experience, a great loss to the institution and individually to all of us. I think every one of us has been touched by Senator Baker. You make us laugh, but then you also make us cry from time to time. Sometimes you just make us stop and think. You have such deep insight and such reverence for the institution, the House of Commons and the Senate. You know so well how we can be two institutions in one great body, complementary. You can stand up and say the Senate has these powers, but you can stand up and say we show deference to the House of Commons. It is quintessential, the essence of being an excellent senator.

(1130)

I hope you will come back and visit us from time to time to share some of the anecdotes, wisdom and institutional memories so that we who are newer here benefit from your great experience, even though you may not be sitting amongst us, that you will continue to share that great wisdom and knowledge with us as we go forward.

I want to also express my appreciation and respect for the Speaker and his hard work. It is not easy to have the job you have, either in the chamber or outside the chamber.

You have been very generous with your skills in moderating our debates. You have leaned over backwards to make sure everyone has an opportunity to speak. You made sure that the motions in front of us are clear. You do all of that to support the business of the Senate in the chamber. We do really wish you all the best going forward. We wish you good rest over the summer.

I want to add our voices, of course, to the Clerk and wish him good luck in the House of Commons, and also our thank you to the law clerk, the corporate head of Senate administration and all the 700-odd people who work for us throughout this institution, some of whom we never see.

I remember saying to Michel Patrice, I walk into my office every day and the carpet is always clean. Who does that? Half of the things that get done here you don't see. People work overnight for us and we don't know they're here. Things happen almost automatically. I say thank you to those people as well: the interpreters, the pages, the debates staff, the clerks of the committees, the people who clean our offices, the security people — there are too many to name and number.

I thank you for the privilege of working with you. I thank the three leaders, Senators Smith, Day and Harder, and all of you. It has been a privilege to work with our new Independent Senators Group. And I look forward to seeing all of you again this fall. Thank you.

Hon. Senators: Hear, hear!

The Hon. the Speaker: Honourable senators, before we suspend, I too want to extend my very best wishes to all senators, our staff, employees of the administration, and of course to our pages, who serve us so well every day that we sit.

Hon. Senators: Hear, hear!

[Translation]

The Hon. the Speaker: Honourable senators, the end of the session is upon us, and I want to thank all senators and everyone who helps us in our parliamentary duties for all their hard work and dedication.

[English]

I must also acknowledge, as have others, that this is the last sitting in which Charles Robert will serve as our Clerk. We cannot talk about dedication to the Senate or dedication to Parliament in general without invoking the name of Charles Robert. I know I speak for everybody. I know you see the appreciation that everybody has shown you, Charles. We are very appreciative of the exemplary work and dedication you have shown while working here in the Senate with us.

I thank you very much.

Hon. Senators: Hear, hear!

The Hon. the Speaker: We want to wish you the best of luck as you take up your new challenge on the greener side of Parliament. Notice I didn't say greener pastures of Parliament. All the very best, Charles.

I also want to extend my best wishes to Senator Lang, Senator Baker, Senator Hubley and Senator Runciman in their retirement. I want to wish you all the very best. Thank you for the hard work and dedication you have shown here serving in this chamber on behalf of all Canadians.

[Translation]

I wish everyone a wonderful summer.

[English]

I wish you all a very happy, healthy holiday summer with your friends and family. I look forward to seeing everyone back in the fall.

Senator Harder: I have one comment I wanted to add. After we suspend and before we come back, you are invited to a reception at my office. It is probably the most important thing I could have said, but I left it for now.

Hon. Senators: Hear, hear!

Visitors in the Gallery

The Hon. the Speaker: Honourable senators, I wish to draw your attention to the presence in the gallery of Melanie Watson, David Cunningham, Tara Parsons, Helmut Waldner, Emma Smith and Britt Parsons. They are the guests of the Honourable Senator Tardif.

On behalf of all honourable senators, I welcome you to the Senate of Canada.

Hon. Senators: Hear, hear!

Business of the Senate

The Hon. the Speaker: Before I call upon Senator Bellemare, Senator Watt.

Hon. Charlie Watt: Honourable senators, I feel I should say something in regard to the motion that I have put forward some months ago. I would ask that Motion No. 192 be called now.

Senator Plett: No, no.

The Hon. the Speaker: Is it agreed, honourable senators?

Some Hon. Senators: No.

The Hon. the Speaker: Sorry, leave is not granted.

[Translation]

Hon. Diane Bellemare (Legislative Deputy to the Government Representative in the Senate): Honourable senators, with leave of the Senate, I move:

That the sitting be suspended to await the announcement of Royal Assent, to reassemble at the call of the chair with a five minute bell.

(The sitting of the Senate was suspended.)

(The sitting was resumed.)

(1250)

Royal Assent

The Hon. the Speaker informed the Senate that the following communication had been received:

RIDEAU HALL

June 22nd, 2017

Mr. Speaker,

I have the honour to inform you that the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, signified royal assent by written declaration to the bills listed in the Schedule to this letter on the 22nd day of June, 2017, at 12:19 p.m.

Yours sincerely,

Patricia Jaton

Deputy Secretary to the Governor General

The Honourable The Speaker of the Senate Ottawa

Bills Assented to Thursday, June 22, 2017:

An Act to establish the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians and to make consequential amendments to certain Acts (Bill C-22, Chapter 15, 2017)

An Act respecting the development of a national strategy for the safe and environmentally sound disposal of lamps containing mercury (Bill C-238, Chapter 16, 2017)

An Act for granting to Her Majesty certain sums of money for the federal public administration for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2018 (Bill C-53, Chapter 17, 2017)

An Act for granting to Her Majesty certain sums of money for the federal public administration for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2018 (Bill C-54, Chapter 18, 2017)

An Act respecting a national strategy for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias (Bill C-233, Chapter 19, 2017)

An Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 22, 2017 and other measures (Bill C-44, Chapter 20, 2017)

Adjournment

Motion Adopted

Hon. Diane Bellemare (Legislative Deputy to the Government Representative in the Senate): With leave of the Senate and notwithstanding rule 5-5(g), I move:

That, when the Senate adjourns today, it do stand adjourned until Tuesday, September 19, 2017, at 2 p.m.

The Hon. the Speaker: Is leave granted, honourable senators?

Hon. Senators: Yes.

The Hon. the Speaker: Is it your pleasure, honourable senators, to adopt the motion?

Hon. Senators: Agreed.

(Motion agreed to.)

(The Senate adjourned until Tuesday, September 19, 2017, at 2 p.m.)